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Question regarding degrees


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#1
Cold Titanium

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Hello folks,

Here is my situation:

I will have an associates degree in computer networking at the end of the summer. I already have a few 4 year schools in sight (think I already have one picked out). My long term goal is to work in security on an international level. From what I can see, I think I would greatly benefit from being able to program. I don't want to just use security programs, I want to be able to write them and fully understand what is going on.

So I have narrowed it down between two degrees.

1. Computer Science

2. Information Technology

According to my research, Computer Science is "is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation, and of practical techniques for their implementation and application in computer systems" (Master Wiki told me)

IT is more implementing existing stuff.

Is that true? I am leaning towards the Computer Science degree.

Thank you for your time :)

~Cold Titanium
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#2
mpascal

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Hi,

I'm currently studying Computer Science myself, I'd say that definition is pretty accurate. Computer Science (at least at my school) is very theory based, and pretty closely related to Mathematics. For my degree I have to take about 50/50 CS and Math classes, so it's really not just programming you're getting into. Does that sort of answer your question?
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#3
Cold Titanium

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Yes! Thanks for the response!

I wanted to see if that description was accurate. Personally, I love math, so I'm cool with that.

One other question:

Now I don't know hardly anything about programming, but approximately how advanced does a BS in CS (hehe I got a rhyme) get you in programming?

Could you give some examples of what you would/should be capable of with a BS?

Edited by Cold Titanium, 27 January 2010 - 08:58 PM.

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#4
mpascal

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Well, I'm only going to be beginning my second year soon, so I can't tell you too much from experience. Programming wise, you will likely be quite strong once you graduate with a BCS. You will likely know a variety of languages, and will have knowledge on more advanced topics such as compilers, operating systems, etc. You will definitely be able to program applications yourself.
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#5
Cold Titanium

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How about embedded type stuff?

Say for example:

I built some sort of minicomputer with a touch screen. Would I be able to adapt a Linux kernel to it and write a driver for the touchscreen?
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#6
mpascal

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I'm sure that would be possible, a lot of the upper year classes focus on things such as user interfaces, real time programming, computer architecture, etc.

Once again, I'm still a junior so I can't quite answer those questions from a personal standpoint.
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#7
Cold Titanium

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Thanks mpascal!

That helped. Now I know who to hunt down when I have a programming question. :)
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#8
mpascal

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Not a problem, glad I could help you out :)

I'm always up to programming challenges, ask me anytime :)
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#9
anzenketh

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However be aware that typicaly the CS degree is in depth but due to that depth is it missing a lot of information covered in the IT or IS degrees. Due to that I am planning on getting both. IT IS to get me a job CS for my enjoyment.
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#10
Cold Titanium

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Could you give me some examples of what is missed?

Also, do you think that my AS in networking (I also have two certificates Net+ and A+) would possibly help fill in some of the "gaps"?
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#11
anzenketh

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The IT/IS degree is a more general degree it covers more of platforms. The CS degree is more of a theory degree covering standards in depth because it does not really cover platforms. At least that is how it is at my school. I would not be able to see what you are missing unless I looked at your schools information. Your AS in network would probably work more for filling in the gaps on the IT not the CS degree as the CS degree is more programing. Both are good degrees it depends on what your goal is for your degree.

Me for example I am getting my IT Degree in Network and system security then going back latter for the CS degree reason for that Is I can get the IT degree fast. The CS degree not so much.
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#12
Cold Titanium

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Well, I want to fully understand all of the "behind the scenes stuff" and I am in no hurry. So maybe I could just get both..CS and IT..

Thanks a ton tuxmaster, believe or not that actually helped quite a bit.
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