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#1
Iconicmoronic

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I have a PC with Intel t4300 processors. I was wondering what architecture it falls under. I am curious to read about assembly language regarding this processor.
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#2
Ferrari

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Penryn... (about 3 years old)

Source: Blogs.Intel.com

Penryn

posted by Dileep Bhandarkar on April 16, 2007

...Penryn is the code name for Intel’s Next Generation Intel® Core™ 2 Family processor microarchitecture. It is also the name of the industry’s first 45 nm microprocessor. It is an improvement on the Core Microarchitecture introduced last year. It delivers more performance at the same clock speed compared to our Core 2 Duo processors. It is a dual core product with a shared 6 MB L2 cache...


Intel® Pentium® Processor T4300 (1M Cache, 2.10 GHz, 800 MHz FSB) <----Specs

Just Google anything more you want to know and it will tell you, I promise. :)
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#3
Iconicmoronic

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I googled it after reading your reply. For the most part the internet seems to have attained the ability to beat around the bush 0.0. It provided a lot of links to various programming languages from the stone age (which from what I understand still have viable relevance in the business world; besides the point), but there were no links that said: "Assembly Language".
So, I didn't find anything useful except one link: Using Assembly Language in Linux which is almost like a sign because I was going to remove Windows 7 from this machine and build LFS on it; of course I have to make sure there are drivers available for the hardware as I do not have the knowledge to build them myself.
Naturally you might see why I am interested in Assembly Langauge merely based on that statement.

I have found books on the topic, intro to and such; however, my understanding is that Assembly Language is specific to a processor in as many cases (or all) as not. So now you can see I am an amateur (like you didn't already know).

I did purchase a book on networking which has some references to Assembly Language! And it is quite useful in making me understand (to the extent I am keeping up) the Assembly Language role in computing. It is based on smart phones though so I'm unsure of its relevance and although I got a Hex Editor to be able to view files which before were not accessible (as I didn't know how to open them), obviously I don't want to mess around if I'm unsure of what the references for the language are going to correlate on this machine specifically.

I've looked at the owners' manuals from old computers and glanced through the one that came with this machine, and like I felt about Microsoft Windows when I read books on the topic, it just doesn't have the information I'm searching for; I've been told it has much ado to the auditing and censorship statutes in place to date but I can't delve into law and computing at the same time when I'm already juggling psychology.

So, I apologize for the lengthy reply; but whether it just be that searching Google is not as simple as "searching Google" or I'm searching for too broad of a topic (which I did specify the architecture of the PC and the processor model) I'm unsure.

Perhaps I might ask if you or anyone on the forums is aware of a website that might point me in a good direction for learning Assembly Language or for purchasing Assembly Language materials and tools.

My specific interest does lie in this particular machine, as where you might upgrade one PC year after year I find that no matter how non-cool a PC has become it still has a good use (even if that's just to "rip it apart")!

Thanks again for your answers.
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#4
Ferrari

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I don't even know what assembly language is. :) You're talking way over my head now. That sounds more like software and such. I think a program called CPU-Z will tell you what instruction code it handles. Is that what you mean? i.e. MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, EMT64T

Other than that, I have no idea. :)

EDIT: And I wonder if what you are looking for isn't published because if it were then other companies could just copy all of Intel's hard work, huh? Not sure...

Edited by Ferrari, 11 April 2010 - 06:30 PM.

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#5
deggitt

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Hi, my days of programing with assembly language ( arm3 risc ) have long gone. Your proc. uses MMX instuction set. Some links for you....

http://www.cpu-world...77GG0451MA.html


http://heather.cs.uc...uxAssembly.html


you could google...mmx assembly language... and see what gives
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#6
Ferrari

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deggit with the save! :) Nice!
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#7
deggitt

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Well THANK YOU ferrari. :)
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#8
deggitt

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googled..


http://webster.cs.uc...ructionSet.html



happy hunting :)
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#9
deggitt

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intel 80x86 instruction set....

http://webster.cs.uc...ructionSet.html


lok down the page for free compilers

http://www.thefreeco...ssemblers.shtml
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#10
deggitt

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Also a good bedtime read !! ( a must read )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86
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