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Which OS to choose?


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#1
Adan

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So a while ago my computer messed up (i have really bad luck with computers), so I was running Linux from a USB drive and the diagnostics was telling me it had many bad sectors so I just bought a new hard drive. Now should I just install Linux, or windows? I can easily install linux from the USB, so that's not a problem. For windows, I don't have my windows 7 install discs, only the recovery disc, but I think I have my old vista discs around somewhere.
I'm thinking windows because there are some programs i like that I'm not sure if work on Linux or not. Anyone have any thoughs or comments?

***Or can I install Linux first then install windows on a seperate partition and choose which to boot from at startup? I'm just spit-balling here and have absolutely no clue how to do this lol
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#2
SpywareDr

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Determine which applications are a 'must have', and then select the Operating System, (and hardware), that'll run those apps.

If you end up with apps that require two different Operating Systems, try setting up a dual boot or virtual machine.
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#3
Adan

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Yeah I was looking around this forum and didn't realize all the questions are are almost identical to mine ha. Mostly all I'm concerned with is dreamweaver, Photoshop, flash, and 3ds max. I use some coding programs but those are cross platform so not a problem, I'll have to look into the adobe products though. Another I use is pinnacle studio to record my xbox gameplay, that's a big one I'm concerned with and couldn't really find anything on google. Will it be just as easy to set up a dual boot if I install Linux first as opposed to installing windows first? Installing Linux after windows seems easy enough as the installer gives you the option, Does windows do the same thing?
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#4
Kemasa

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My personal preference is to use Linux as the base OS and then use VirtualBox for Windoze and/or other test environments. I dislike dual boot since sometimes you would have to constantly reboot back & forth. I actually prefer two machines to a dual boot machine.

The virtual machine is really nice if you have dual monitors since they you can have two machines at once.
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#5
Adan

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How big are the differences between distros? I'm trying to choose between Linux mint or ubuntu, i've used mint a few times and it seems pretty good, easy to get thhe hang of, never used ubuntu though, but have heard good things about it.
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#6
DaffyKantReed

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Mint is based on Ubuntu which is based on Debian. Of the three, Mint is probably the most user friendly out of the box.


If you dual boot, make sure you install the MS OS first, as it will hose Grub if you install Windows last.
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#7
Adan

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I like the virtual machine idea though I'll look into it more since I've never used it. If not then I'll install windows first then Linux second to dual boot.

So I think what I'll do is install mint then install windows on a virtual machine. Chose this because it's gonna take some time to find my vista/ win7 discs. I'll let you know how it goes though.

Edited by Adan, 15 April 2010 - 02:54 PM.

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#8
DaffyKantReed

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Right on.
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#9
Adan

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as i said before, worst luck with computers. ever.

installed linux mint, randomly freezes up on me, sometimes the system will reboot on its own while im just browsing a forum.

it doesn't reconize my mousepad as having the buttons built in, so where the left and right buttons used to be, are now just reconized at part of the pad, so i can only left click by tapping, no right click at all.

im going to ruin this brand new hard drive if i have to keep using the power button to shut it down. the system keeps freezing and won't let me access the terminal or ctrl alt f1 (which is the equiv. of ctrl alt del, correct?), sometimes the mouse still works, but wont let me click anything.

i hate computers. with a passion.

Edited by Adan, 15 April 2010 - 06:04 PM.

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#10
DaffyKantReed

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You don't have much choice other than to strip the hardware down to a bear minimum. Use one DIMM of RAM, PSU, optical drive, CPU and mainboard. Disconnect peripherals as well. Try booting the Ubuntu/Mint Live CD.
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#11
biggles1000

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Yay, you use Mint as well! I you want reliability (apart from viruses etc.) use Windows. If you want speed, free-ness and amazing effects, go for Linux, preferably Mint, but back up your documents regularly.

Mint has it's problems. I presume you are using a laptop, ie the mouse problem. Have you tried using a USB mouse? I'm afraid I can't think of a sollution to the freezing.
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#12
DaffyKantReed

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I do use Mint, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Debian, both Lenny and Testing, 64 and 32-bit versions. Of the four distros I find Debian to be most stable. Mint is the most user friendly. Kubuntu 9.10 was easy to use and update via aptitude, but was unstable for me when Ubuntu, Debian, and Linux Mint 8 were stable. It's not a hardware issue, and I can not track the source of segfaults, so I've set 32-bit Kubuntu aside for now.

The Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx) partitioner is messing up and not detecting this single SATA 250GB WD HDD, so I'm in no hurry to play with it further.
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