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Static IP and Wireless Acess Point(s)


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#1
DF Simmons

DF Simmons

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Hello
:) Newer member here, learning more before I set up a WAP for a neighbor on his third floor to eliminate connectivity probs. He already is running a LAN: Comcast modem > Linksys router > one WG602 WAP (on 1st floor). As I recall the existing WAP is setup with a static IP and access is limited via MAC ID of household laptops.
I know all this because someone smarter than me set it all up.
Now I need to add an identical WAP on an unused node of the LAN. Worried that I am going to make a simple task into a big problem (a skill of mine)so I want to walk through it in advance.
Questions: How do I determine an appropriate static IP address? I think I can find the ip address of the dhcp server by Command Prompt / RUN / ipconfig... right?
Should I set security settings if access control will limit use to specific MAC id's?
Should all access and security settings be completed before changing IP address etc? Seems like when I did this before I got booted out of the WAP setup menu as soon as I applied the new IP address information.
I would assume that the ip address of the second WAP need to be different from the first.
Other than IP address will I need any other information from the first WAP to set up the second WAP?
Any additional suggestions and "what not to do's" would be appreciated.
Referral to an existing thread welcome!
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#2
DF Simmons

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Reply to my own thread.

I have been practicing with this WAP (Netgear WG602v.4) and I have a question.

After setting it up with static IP (192.168.1.10) to run on my network here at home, I can no longer access the WAP admin / settings menu. I thought that would be found at the same address as the static IP.
I know I can do a factory reset and then log on at 192.168.0.227, but shouldn't you be able to get into the menu after changing the ip settings?

Thanks in advance.

Edited by DF Simmons, 19 April 2010 - 01:27 PM.

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#3
diabillic

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Make sure both your AP's are on the same network. It seems like you assigned the same IP to both WAP's.

Lets say your router is setup with a default address of 192.168.1.1/24. So that means the following:

IP: 192.168.1.1
Subnet: 255.255.255.0

That's the default class c subnet for the 192.168 address. Normally, all SOHO routers default to a 50 host DHCP scope. The host portion of the IP is the last octet, the .1...so you can assign any address from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.50...The IP of the second WAP needs to be different as no 2 devices on the same network can have the same address, same way no 2 houses on the same block can have the same address.

Your IP, subnet, gateway and DNS info can all be found from ipconfig /all you are correct. Your router is also your gateway, which is the last point on your internal network before you hit your WAN, or the internet cloud. Also, your router will be assigning the DNS dynamically as it pulls that information from the modem.

You will need to obtain the following:

- IP and subnet of the router
- IP and subnet of the first WAP
- create a copy of the config from the first WAP
- DHCP scope being used from the router

If you need any assistance, please feel free as this is a lot of information.
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#4
DF Simmons

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Thanks for the reply.

router is setup with a default address of 192.168.1.1/24

I am not familiar with the way you expressed that as a fraction? do you mean to say that the last octet value of most routers is typically expressed as any value between 1 & 24?

Tomorrow I set up the AP at ken's house. His internet provider is Comcast mine is Verizon (now Fairpoint) so the values will change. It's also different because router function and modem are all in one at my place. At his place Comcast provides a Motorola surfboard modem and then he has a Linksys router as I recall.

Which leads me to wonder if I will need any information from the modem? And how will I know looking at the information from a command prompt which is which? (router/modem).

Any idea on this?

After setting the AP with static IP (192.168.1.10) to run on my network here at home, I can no longer access the WAP admin / settings menu. I thought that would be found at the same address as the static IP.


Thanks in advance for you help

Edited by DF Simmons, 20 April 2010 - 05:30 AM.

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#5
diabillic

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I am not familiar with the way you expressed that as a fraction? do you mean to say that the last octet value of most routers is typically expressed as any value between 1 & 24?


This is whats called CIDR notation, just an abbreviation.

Which leads me to wonder if I will need any information from the modem? And how will I know looking at the information from a command prompt which is which? (router/modem).


You will not need any info from the modem, the router pulls the WAN IP, gateway, and DNS addresses from it.

Any idea on this?

After setting the AP with static IP (192.168.1.10) to run on my network here at home, I can no longer access the WAP admin / settings menu. I thought that would be found at the same address as the static IP.


You probably have another device on your network with the same IP. Check the IP addresses of your PC's, printers, first WAP, etc to see if there is a conflict.

Edited by diabillic, 20 April 2010 - 09:06 AM.

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