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limit incoming trafic available to mac addresses


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#1
Grogie

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I am just a beginner trying to police my house. I am a satellite internet prisoner due to location. I have 1Mb down and 256Kb up in what I understand is an “hourly bucket system”. The provider does not openly share the limits but the bottom line is; what they call the fare access policy is so written they can do what they want.

In my house I have 2 PC's hard wired an Xbox, laptop and an iPod wireless and other visitors.

What I want is to limit the "bandwidth"? available to the mac addresses. This is a parenting issue, as it is now I have certain mac addresses in a access restriction policy and lock them out when I use the internet. Also I have tried to use the QoS restrictions but I find that while I am not using the internet, the iPods, Nintendo DS's and kids who don't understand the problem (or refuse to) are constantly taking me into the FAP limits so when I do go to use the internet it is already taxed.

Bla Bla Bla. So, can I say "mac address 00:00:00:00:00 only gets 2KB/s (or whatever) all the time" somewhere? Because the QoS seems to spread the % of use real time as opposed to a bandwidth limit per user.

I have looked around quite a bit via Google and to some extent on this site. This question has been raised directly on the Cisco site but the final answerer there was only the provider can limit download speed. Other than that thread I always get pointed back to QoS. Unless I am doing it wrong (very possible) I am not getting the result I want.

"While outbound QoS can delay outgoing packets to conform to your rules, incoming QoS can only throw away (not delay) incoming data, which produces erratic and inefficient results"

This quopte is found in some QoS descussions, is that the end/answere of my question? or is there another way to do what I need to do? Is there an afordable router that can handel TCP for users, will my router do it?

WRT54G v8 running dd-wrt.v24 micro
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#2
diabillic

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Hats off to you for flashing with DDWRT first off.

You want to enable bandwidth throttling, which is a form of QoS. I would refer to the DDWRT documentation.


If you would like to set hard coded bandwidth limits (throttling), this can be done using the tc command


Edited by diabillic, 28 April 2010 - 04:34 PM.

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#3
Grogie

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Wow that is way over my head! Flashing is one thing but my own build is another. Everyone wants as much as they can get! People who run networks must have problem users that draw all the time. This should be a plug and play mod. Limit incoming bandwidth to mac address... someone must have an easy answer?
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#4
diabillic

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Yes, we do. That is why we throttle them :)

Most of the time, those resources that use the most bandwidth (P2P applications, youtube) for example are completely blocked.

They offer a paid version that offers extended QoS control and makes it much easier

http://www.dd-wrt.co...pecial_Versions

- set maximum bandwidth available per netmask/MAC address (v.24-SP1: even for different vlans)
- set a default rule for any unconfigured netmask/MAC address


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#5
Grogie

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Awesome! I am looking at this, I just want to be sure that it will do what I want before I invest the $20. I am on that forum now checking with them. Thanks again for your help! Props given!

G
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#6
dsenette

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IMO this is a major drawback to home routers. they're made for easy setup and use. a firewall is what you need to do proper throttling. home routers often include firewalls but they're VERY limited. enterprise level firewalls let you do as much packet shaping/throttling/etc... as you want(you can get a Cisco PIX 515e or a 5505 firewall off ebay for less than $200), it just requires a massive learning curve to know what you're doing.
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#7
Grogie

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dsenette, I hope I don't have to go that far to bring some order this mess. I don't want to invest that much into it.

So at the 20-50 price point for a router, which is going to serve me better; tomato or dd-wrt? (for QoS")
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