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Are only WPA2 more secure than "mixed WPA2/WPA"?


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#1
Selix

Selix

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Hi,

Logically it should reasonably mixed version of both WPA2 and WPA to be safer than only, WPA2. But I based on the knowledge I have, and it is not too great in terms of wireless security. So what are the safest?

The same question is applicable to the AES encryption is preferable to TKIP. But if I use both TKIP + AES, this is preferable to only AES security reasons?

Thanks.
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#2
SupeR GeekiN CognitO

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I don't think your understanding what mixed WPA/WPA-2 setting actually means.

WPA-2 is more secure than WPA. Some network cards don't support WPA-2.
So, for example, if you have two laptop's on WiFi, and one supports WPA-2
and one doesn't, then you would have to use the mixed setting. If they
both supported WPA-2, then you would use just WPA-2 setting.

Same goes for AES/TKIP. AES is more secure than TKIP, but not all systems
support AES. :)





:) SGC :)
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#3
happyrock

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I don't think your understanding what mixed WPA/WPA-2 setting actually means.

WPA-2 is more secure than WPA. Some network cards don't support WPA-2.
So, for example, if you have two laptop's on WiFi, and one supports WPA-2
and one doesn't, then you would have to use the mixed setting. If they
both supported WPA-2, then you would use just WPA-2 setting.

Same goes for AES/TKIP. AES is more secure than TKIP, but not all systems
support AES. :)


well done...clear and concise... :)
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#4
Selix

Selix

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Now I understand, why it was written so in the router. And I got no response when I used Google/Wikipedia for my reflection.

Thanks and as the writer who wrote in before me, for the concise answer! :)

I don't think your understanding what mixed WPA/WPA-2 setting actually means.

WPA-2 is more secure than WPA. Some network cards don't support WPA-2.
So, for example, if you have two laptop's on WiFi, and one supports WPA-2
and one doesn't, then you would have to use the mixed setting. If they
both supported WPA-2, then you would use just WPA-2 setting.

Same goes for AES/TKIP. AES is more secure than TKIP, but not all systems
support AES. :)





:) SGC :)


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