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My pc will not turn on


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#1
Kane.D

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Hello, I'll explain my problem in full a few days ago I was playing a game on my pc and it turned itself off (No shut down screen or anything)

when I tried to turn it back on it would not power up (now unplugging the cord and leaving it like that for 2minutes I tried again the lights of my tower turned on for less then a second and turned back off)

I also tried leaving it off for a day with it unplugged when I tried to turn it on the lights came on(it stayed on for 10 seconds this time) I could hear the fan starting and it would shut down right away again.

Now I'm thinking my motherboard may be fried or maybe its the psu but I'm not sure any one have any idea?


Graphics card ATI radeon X1300

AMD Athlon 64X2 Dual Core Processor 5000+

System model :MS-7270


(just a note as its obvious I'm a pc noob while I have my guesses what it might be I have don't have the knowledge or ever tried for that matter on how to check for faulty psu or motherboard or whatever it may be and hoping I will be pointed in the right direction on this at least as I don't have enough money or friends with extra parts that would allow me to buy or borrow parts so I can test the problem out one at a time)
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#2
SpywareDr

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If you have a multimeter, here's how to test the power supply:

Testing PSU Voltages
http://www.ochardwar...t/psuvolt2.html

Trigger Power Supply for testing
http://www.duxcw.com/faq/ps/ps4.htm

In depth look at the power supply
http://www.informit....le.aspx?p=31105


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#3
123Runner

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It does sound like a bad PSU. If the checks that SpywareDr gave are good, then we could be looking at a bad main board or possibly a add on component (drive, CD, video card, etc) pulling the voltages down/ or shorted.
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#4
Digerati

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Testing a PSU with a multimeter, especially in the manner shown at OCHardware is not conclusive. In fact, it even says

There is one major flaw in this technique, nothing is drawing power from the PSU. So, the voltages that this will give you aren't necessarily what your computer parts are receiving. However, this will let you know if your PSU is capable of supplying the correct amount of voltage, and will also ensure that it is not defective.

See the contradiction?

They are absolutely correct in stating that method has a major flaw but they are totally incorrect when they say this method will show if the voltages are correct. That is absolutely wrong - and they even say so by admitting the voltages are not what the motherboard will (needs to) see. :)

The ONLY way to properly test a PSU is while it is under realistic loads - which is impossible to achieve with the PSU main connector unplugged. And testing the main connector attached to the motherboard then requires jamming with considerable force, highly conductive, and very sharp and hard meter probes into the heart of the motherboard - where one small slip can damage, and/or destroy the board.

Here is my canned text on testing PSUs:

To properly and conclusively test a power supply unit (PSU), it must be tested under various realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive ripple and other anomalies. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronic repair facilities.

Fortunately, there are other options that are almost as good. I keep a FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester in my tool bag when I am "in the field" and don't have a good spare power supply to swap in. While not a certain test, they are better than nothing. The advantage of this model is that it has an LCD readout of the voltage. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within specified ATX Form Factor Standard tolerances. Lesser models use LEDs to indicate the voltage is just within some "range". These are less informative, considerably cheaper, but still useful for detecting PSUs that have already "failed". Newegg has several testers to choose from. All these testers contain a "dummy load" to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to a motherboard, and therefore allows the PSU to power on, if able, without being attached to a motherboard - great for testing fans, but again, it is not a true load or suitable for conclusive testing.

Swapping in a known good supply is a tried and trued method of troubleshooting, used for years even by pros. If you have access to a suitably sized, spare power supply, carefully remove the suspect supply and replace it with a known good one and see if the problem goes away.

I do not recommend using a multimeter to test power supplies. To do it properly, that is, under a realistic load, the voltages on all the pins must be measured while the PSU is attached to the motherboard and the computer powered on. This requires poking (with some considerable force) two hard and sharp, highly conductive meter probes into the main power connector, deep in the heart of the computer. One tiny slip can destroy the motherboard, and everything plugged into it. It is not worth the risk considering most multimeters, like plug-in testers, do not measure, or reveal any unwanted and potentially disruptive AC components to the DC voltages.

Note the required voltage tolerance ranges:

Posted Image


And remember, anything that plugs into the wall can kill. Do not open the power supply's case unless you are a qualified electronics technician. There are NO user serviceable parts inside a power supply.


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#5
Kane.D

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Hey guys thanks for the reply I will go over the guides when I have time it will take me a little due to needing to wait for my paycheck before I can go out and get the right tools (the psu tester) anyway I will post the results when I'm able to get them just hoping it really is only the psu and not something else
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#6
123Runner

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You should be able to get the PSU tested at a local computer store.
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#7
Digerati

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You should be able to get the PSU tested at a local computer store.

I agree. Call around. Many do it for a nominal fee, or even free if you buy a new one there - just ensure you pick a reputable shop. If this does end up being a PSU problem, make sure you buy a quality PSU from a reputable maker that has enough horsepower to carry you through years of service. I have another canned text (as seen in the second half of this post) that can help you size and select a new PSU I will post if needed.
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