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weak wireless signal


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#1
deppert1

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I just recently had time warner wireless network installed in my home
my signal is wek to good at most spots
my modem and router are in my basement I have two computers that I need to connect
if I move the router close to one of them I can get a strong signal on that computer but no signal or very weak on the other computer (both desktops)
My question is can I hardwire one of them to the modem if yes how?
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#2
hendaz

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The weak signal will most likely be because your wireless router is in the basement and so the signal range will be affect greatly. If you want to connect a computer wired rather than wireless then you would connect your computer to the router not the modem. I'm assuming your router has free ports on the back. So your configuration would be modem plugs into router and then the other computer connects to a spare port on the router as well. To do this you will need an Ethernet cable - probably a Cat 5e UTP cable.
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#3
amw_drizz

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just recently had time warner wireless network installed in my home
my signal is wek to good at most spots
my modem and router are in my basement I have two computers that I need to connect
if I move the router close to one of them I can get a strong signal on that computer but no signal or very weak on the other computer (both desktops)
My question is can I hardwire one of them to the modem if yes how?

Before I delve into the mater. You said you have a modem and router. Look on the back of the router if you have additional Ethernet ports. (Will look like the cable connecting the modem to the router) Then you are set. Now if you plan on tackling this your self then continue to read on. Otherwise still read it over and consider having an licensed electrician come out and do the actual install for you. Since most locals have building codes that prevent you from hiring anyone to do the type of work to do a proper installation, but they have loopholes to allow a DIY'er to do it themselves.

The hardest part of hard wiring them in is figuring out how you want it done. The best way and the cleanest way is make a hole in each wall and feed the network line in through the walls. Doing this would be the best way to do it, you won't see any cables on the floor and in the end it will look nicer. If you are uncomfortable to do it that way you can run the cables along the sides of the walls down to the router and call it a day that way. But then you have the cables running over the house.

If both computers are on the first floor or the floor directly over the basement then you can get away with notching a hole in the floor in each room the computer is in and drop the line that way.

But depending on the network you wish to have either a CAT5E or CAT6 cable will do. IF you plan on using a 1gb+ network in the future then you will want CAT6 for full usability. Now keep in mind that Cat5E will handle it but remember that some cable manufactures say Cat5e but in reality it isn't.

Also remember any network cable be it Cat5E or Cat6 has a length limitation of 100 meters (about 300 ft). There are a few guides on how to crimp your own ends. and Most of the plugs for the wall use a punch down method. It is fairly easy to assemble. Give your self a good day if you've never done anything like this before to get it done right.

Last note, If you plan on running the network lines near major power junctions and you use UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) you will get EMI (electronic magnetic interference) which will degrade the line quality. So keep that in mind so you can try to avoid major power junctions when you are running the wires. Also remember that if you have to run cables near any major power junctions you may want to consider using STP (Shielded Twisted Pair), but it is more expensive and for it to work right the whole line needs to be STP for it to be effective.

Also, if your questioning on price. If you don't have the tools, then plan on it being about $100-200 for lines, ends, temrinal crimper, wall jacks, face plates, and jack boxes. If you have the terminal crimper knock $30-50 off of the price. If you go Cat5E make sure all the components are rated at Cat5E standards at least, Cat6 Components will work and are backward compatible with Cat5E components. But all Cat6 equipment will perform at Cat5E performance.


I hope I didn't confuse you more, but once you get the hang of it; it is quick and easy to install additional lines and add more hardware to expand the network in the future. Good luck and if you have anymore questions just ask, we are here to help. :)
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