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Not being an administrator when using Windows?


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#1
lo2

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Hi there

I have been told that it is a good idea not to have administrator rights when using windows, and I guess that it is quite probable that it is a good idea. So is it?

If so. How do you do it?

I was told that I should create another user, so that there are two users one the computer one administrator and one who is not.

I did so, but then it seemed as though I was entering another version of Windows, (with the new account) for instance some programs that I had just installed, was not there. I did not like this idea of having two "versions" of windows running on the same computer.

So what is the smartest way to do this?
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#2
Neil Jones

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The issue with doing this under XP is a lot of software, particularly older software, will not run under a Limited Account.
No matter how many accounts you have, it is still the same Windows. Each account can have it's own Start Menu, icons, wallpaper, etc.
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#3
lo2

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Ok so what do I make of this? Do you recommend me to be an administrator or not? Sorry but just not sure :)
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#4
Macboatmaster

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There are two main reasons not to use the administrator acount.
One is if you are in a location, ie: a college or similar where if you leave the computer on, anyone has full permissions to do anything they wish.
The other is from the point of view of a hijacker gaining acess to the computer.
Security concious people use a Non-admin acount for everyday use and the admin account when they need to.
When you set the new acount it will seem like a new version of windows, as your data will not be there.
If you wish to use a non-admin acount having read the link I have included, simply change your account to a non admin account.
Note the guidance that you cannot change the account you are actually using.
You must have ONE admin account.

The Omnipotent Administrator
When you use Windows XP, you belong to one of two groups: Administrators or Users. Administrators are all-powerful: if you have a so-called Admin account, you can make system wide changes and change other users' accounts. While this power is a boon to the ego, it's also dangerous. If, for example, you encounter a virus, a Trojan horse, or a worm while you're logged on as Administrator, you could wreck all the accounts on your entire system.


Log in as User, on the other hand, and any damage you cause will be less extensive, because ordinary users are prevented from making system wide changes. A word to the wise: Do your everyday computing as a regular user and log on as Administrator only when it's absolutely necessary, such as when adding a new user or changing security settings. To sign on as User, use the Run As command: just right-click a shortcut and select Run As. As long as you know the username and password, you can sign on as another user.
http://www.microsoft...minaccount.mspx

Edited by Macboatmaster, 02 September 2010 - 02:29 PM.

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