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Computer tipped over!


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#1
Goggleplex-Googleplex

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My computer tower tipped over and it sounded like the fan stopped.
The next day I opened the case, then plugged the computer in and pushed the power button to turn the computer on. I wanted to see if the power supply fan was spinning. But now the whole computer won't start. It's dead!!!!!! Can someone please help me with this? What should I do before I take it to Best Buy?

I disconnected everything before opening the case. Then I only connected the power chord.

The computer was on when it tipped over. It stayed on. Only the sound of the fan was gone. I quickly shut down the computer and restarted it. It restarted fine but there was no fan sound.
But today when I opened the case and plugged the power chord in to check the PSU fan, the whole machine was dead!
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#2
rshaffer61

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What happens if you don't open the case and start it?
Does it then start and run correctly?
How old is the system?
Is there a warranty still on it?
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#3
Goggleplex-Googleplex

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The computer won't start, no matter what I do.
There's no more warranty.
The system is probably 5 years old.

If the mobo is cracked, I'm wondering how much a new one will cost!!!!!!!! :D

But the shock from the tip-over doesn't seem anywhere strong enough to crack the board.
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#4
Digerati

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I would press on all the power connections to make sure none came loose but there's a good chance the weight of the heavy CPU heatsink fan assembly put too much stress on the CPU socket or motherboard mounting holes. If you are not comfortable, I would take it too a shop.

A replacement motherboard is possible, but if this system is 5 years old, I would just budget for a new PSU with Windows 7.
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#5
rshaffer61

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I ask because of the following.

The computer was on when it tipped over. It stayed on. Only the sound of the fan was gone. I quickly shut down the computer and restarted it. It restarted fine but there was no fan sound.
But today when I opened the case and plugged the power chord in to check the PSU fan, the whole machine was dead!


You said it started but no fan sound.
Then you said you opened the case and it didn't start.
Did you close the case and try starting it?
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#6
Goggleplex-Googleplex

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I tried starting it with the case closed as well. I left no stone unturned! Tried "everything." No cigar! :D I brought it to a shop and they said they were sure it was a shorted out PSU. I'm gonna replace it and see what happens. There's a lotta dust in the case and the PSU too. They said that could've contributed to killing the PSU.

This story doesn't really "ring true" with me but let's see what happens with a new power supply.
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#7
rshaffer61

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This story doesn't really "ring true" with me but let's see what happens with a new power supply.

Actually there is a lot of truth in their statement. Dust is the biggest contributor of overheating in a system. It blocks vents from exhausting heated air out of the system.
It stops or slows fans down from circulating and eventually exhausting that air out.
Overheating is the usually the number one reason for component failure in a system with electrical shock being the second.

With the system tipping over it could have caused a sudden movement from within the PSU's components causing a short. Just enough to fry the PSU thus causing the system not to start as you have witnessed now. Being full of dust as you put it would back this up and a thorough cleaning with a can of compressed air would be advisable.
Pay close attention to all vents and fans but do not allow the fans to turn freely when blowing them out. This could damage the bearings.
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#8
Goggleplex-Googleplex

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But the sudden movement could not have fried the PSU because the computer continued to run after the tip-over! I shut it down and restarted it and Windows started normally. Then I immediately shut the computer down again when I couldn't hear a fan sound. Only when I tried to turn the computer on again the next day, did it refuse to start. Do you think the movement involved in picking it up off the floor and putting it on the bed horizontally could have dealt the final blow to the PSU, now that it had already been compromised?
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#9
rshaffer61

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Then I immediately shut the computer down again when I couldn't hear a fan sound.

First sign of a problem

Only when I tried to turn the computer on again the next day, did it refuse to start.


Result of the tipiing and fan not working

Do you think the movement involved in picking it up off the floor and putting it on the bed horizontally could have dealt the final blow to the PSU, now that it had already been compromised?


Completely and you actually have put it the exact sequence of The Death of a PSU Story. :D
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#10
Goggleplex-Googleplex

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I'm getting a PSU. The price is $119 new. But a used one is much cheaper. $22... Should I get the used one or the new one? I don't wanna end up with more problems with a used power supply after all this. I took out the old one already just to familiarize myself with things. It doesn't say "refurbished." What if the condition is close to mine? What if there's dust in it that I can't see from the outside? What if it's just about to fail? OYE!

Sorry... I don't know much about PSU stuff. :D
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#11
rshaffer61

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Anytime you buy a used component you have no ideal what shape it is in.
Also there won't be any warranty on it unlike a new one that you can register and have the manufacturer warranty on it.
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