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Building a new pc, two options


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#1
Thunderbird1988

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Hello,

A friend of mine is going to build a new computer. I helped him to choose the components, this is what we choose:

Processor: Intel Core i5 2500k

Motherboard: Asrock P67 Extreme4

RAM: Corsair XMS CMX4GX3M2A1600C9

PSU: XFX Pro (black edition in America) 750 watt

DVD writer: Sony Optiarc AD-7260S

CPU fan: Scythe Mugen 2

HDD Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ, 1TB

Screen: Iiyama ProLite E2710HDSD-B1 (an 27 inch monitor, my friend likes a low pixel density (not sure why) so we have choosen a large monitor)

The case, OS, mouse and keyboard are already available.



Now my question is: my friend wants a new GPU and an SSD. But he doesn't has money for both right now so we have two options now:

Option 1: Buying a new GPU (probably an AMD radeon 6950 which can be flashed to a Radeon HD 6970) and buying the SSD later.

Option 2: Buying an SSD (OCZ Vertex2 3,5" 120 GB) and using the GPU from his previous computer (an ATI Radeon HD 4850 x2) and buying the new GPU later

Which option would you recommand? and why?

Thanks,

Thunderbird1988
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#2
mkau

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Sounds good to me.
SSD, buy a new GPU later. a 4850 x2 should still have plenty of power - considering it's basically a 5850 sans DX11 and at 55nm.
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#3
iammykyl

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buy a new GPU later

Agreed. Bye using the SSD, you will only have to install the OS once.
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#4
iammykyl

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Your Mobo, > http://www.newegg.co...0P67%20Extreme4 Has SATA 6.0Gb/s

Hard drive you selected Is SATA 3/0Gb/s, I would look at these. > http://www.newegg.co...N82E16822136533 My choice, Black WD1002FAEX

Video card review and benchmarks, > http://www.guru3d.co...50-6970-review/ Note that the Radeon HD 6950 TDP is only 140w Also the Temps.

Flashing Tool, >
http://downloads.gur...nload-2658.html

PSU, review and benchmarks, > http://www.hardwares...ly-Review/933/1 I would use a PSU calculator found in this page, together with some instruction,as the 650w may do the job. Thanks to Digerati > [quote][Here's my canned text on sizing and buying a PSU:



Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your minimum power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom of the page. I recommend setting Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home) or extreme 3D animated gaming, I recommend setting both TDP and system load to 100%. These steps ensure the supply has adequate head room for stress free (and perhaps quieter) operation, and future hardware demands. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements for your card listed on your video card maker's website. If not listed, check a comparable card (same graphics engine and RAM) from a different maker. The key specifications, in order of importance are:
  • Current (amperage or amps) on the +12V rail,
  • Efficiency,
  • Total wattage.
Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply! Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. Look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Note that some case retailers "toss in" a generic or inadequate PSU just to make the case sale. Be prepared to "toss out" that supply for a good one with sufficient power.

Most PSUs have an efficiency rating of around 70%. This means for every 100 watts of power a PSU draws from the wall, only 70 watts is delivered to the motherboard, with the rest wasted in the form of heat. The best supplies are 85 to 90% efficient, and as expected, cost more. I strongly recommend you pick a quality supply with an efficiency rating equal to or greater than 80%. Look for
80 Plus - EnergyStar Compliant labels.

Too big of a PSU hurts nothing but your budget. Your computer will draw from the PSU only what it needs, not what the PSU is capable of delivering. If a computer needs 300 watts it will draw 300 watts regardless if the PSU is a 350W, 650W, or 1000W PSU. In turn, the PSU, regardless its size will draw from the wall only what it needs to support the computer. In this example, it will draw 300 watts, plus another 45 – 90 watts, depending on the PSU's inefficiency.

As noted, the eXtreme Calculator determines the minimum requirements. If the calculator (with the changes I suggested) recommends a 400 watt minimum, a quality 400W supply will serve you just fine. But a quality 550W – 600W supply will have, among other things, larger heat sinks to dissipate potentially more heat. It might have a larger fan too. The 400W supply will run most of the time closer to capacity, while the larger supply will be loafing along, rarely breaking a sweat. To help the smaller heat sinks get rid of the wasted 80 watts (20% of 400) of heat, the fan in the 400W supply may need to run full speed, while the fan in the larger supply, with bigger sinks just loafs along too – but in near silence.

/quote]

Scythe Mugen 2 Reviews and comparison tables, > http://www.silentpcr...e961-page1.html Note that best results are with 2 fans.

Edited by iammykyl, 12 January 2011 - 12:27 AM.

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#5
iammykyl

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Neglected to point out that if you do flash the 6950 to a 6970 The TDP increase to 190w.
this needs to factored in when using the PSU calculator.
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#6
Thunderbird1988

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Hello,

Thank you for your replies mkau en Iammykyl,

My friend found some extra money so he can now buy both the gpu and the ssd. :D

Hard drive you selected Is SATA 3/0Gb/s, I would look at these. > http://www.newegg.co...N82E16822136533 My choice, Black WD1002FAEX


I find that harddrive very expensive. The Samsung costs around 50 euros while the WD costs 80 euro's (for comparison a 7200 rpm 1,5 TB harddrive can be bought for 70 euro's) is a sata-600 interface really worth that extra money? And does the WD have that much speed that a sata-300 interface would be a bottleneck?

My friend wants to be able to add another GPU in crossfire. He also would like to overclock the processor to 4, maybe 4,5 ghz (if the CPU fan allows that) I don't know if he will need to raise the vcore. The processor is not in the list of that PSU calculator. Do you think the chosen PSU would be sufficient, or will my friend need a 850 watts PSU?

Thunderbird1988
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#7
iammykyl

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find that hard drive very expensive. The Samsung costs around 50 euros while the WD costs 80 euros (for comparison a 7200 rpm 1,5 TB hard drive can be bought for 70 euros) is a sata-600 interface really worth that extra money? And does the WD have that much speed that a SATA-300 interface would be a bottleneck?


After more research, your concern about speed and cost is justified. There is o mechanical 7200RPM drive out there yet that get close to to SATA 3.0 speed.
The WD out performs the Samsung in some parts of testing, but not overall. Best tech review I could find sums it all up as it tests the drives against each other.
> http://techreport.co...icles.x/19330/1

I can find Plenty about CPU, RAM, GPU but nothing about SATA 3.0 when used as a storage drive. Perhaps others have thought?

:D Ignore my choice. My WD cost me $95AUD and am happy with it but could have saved myself money with the Samsung.



Look for other calculators and see if the GPU is listed. I will see what info I can get.

The case, OS, mouse and keyboard are already available.


Is the OS retail? enabling installation on the new system.
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#8
Thunderbird1988

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Hello,

Thank you again for your reply.

Look for other calculators and see if the GPU is listed. I will see what info I can get.


I'm sorry, I meant to say that the CPU is not on the list, instead of the GPU.
I think I'm going to recommand a 850 watt power supply as these supplies aren't to much more expensive than a 750 watt supply and I want to be on the safe side.

Is the OS retail? enabling installation on the new system.

No, but he could get a new copy via the store of his university, which has, along with many other Dutch universities, made an agreement with Microsoft so students of those universities can get Windows for much less then the retail price.

Thunderbird1988
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#9
iammykyl

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Not to worry, spotted it on the first calculator I tried. Based the CPU on the Xeon 3430. Tried 4 and all came back 800w + and as we know they all over estimate, so should be alright with the 850w.

Get a 64Bit flavour of Window 7.

If you do install an an after market heatsink and cooler I recommend you read this test report for TIM. > http://skinneelabs.c...rt1.html?page=1

Please let us know how the build pans out. This might be the first Sandy Bridge build on the forum so some game results would be great.
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#10
Thunderbird1988

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Hello,

Get a 64Bit flavour of Window 7.


Yes, he did

If you do install an an after market heatsink and cooler I recommend you read this test report for TIM


While this is defitnetly not my first build I make, I have never used aftermarket thermic compound. Can you tell me how much better aftermarket compound is compared with the compound that comes with the mugen 2?

Please let us know how the build pans out. This might be the first Sandy Bridge build on the forum so some game results would be great.


I shall ask my friend if he wants to do that. Due to personal circumstances and the fact that the chosen processor isn't available very well. We have chosen to postpone this project until the end of January.

Do you have a list with games you would like to be benchmarked and do you know if there are free benchmark demo's of that games?

Thunderbird1988
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#11
iammykyl

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I now always use the same TIM, MX-2, easy to use, non-conductive and non-capacitive qualities, very short cure time. Some coolers come with very poor TIM, so I use the same paste rather than take a risk. Can't say it is better than the one supplied with the Mugen.

Any games he can borrow and perhaps 3Dmark, > http://www.3dmark.co...ark11/download/

Thank you.

Let us know how you get on.
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#12
Thunderbird1988

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Hello,

The computer has been built, a lot of benchmarks won't run properly, but we were able to run S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Call of Prypiat

these are the results:

Test 1 Day: Min FPS: 60, average 114 max 158
Test 2 Night: Min FPS: 59 average 104, max 161
Test 3 Rain: Min Fps: 55 average 114, max 157
Test 4 SunShafts: Min fps: 34 average 50 max 81

The benchmarks ran on ultra high on a resolution of 1920*1080
the OS was Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit.
All hardware ran on default speeds.

Thunderbird1988
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#13
Spyderturbo007

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If he did go with the P67 / H67 chipset that you have linked to in your first post, it looks like he is going to be effected by the recent recall on those chipsets. :D

Might want to give this Intel Press Release a read when you have some free time.
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