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Windows 7 x64 BSOD


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#1
TheRagnarok

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Hi everyone! :D

I keep getting random BSOD about 5-10 mins of cold booting my laptop. After reboot it works fine. I have re-installed Windows many times (thinking about trying 32-bit Win7).

I have ran memtest and instantly received a crapload of errors, flushed contacts/pins with 99% Isopropyl Alcohol, reseated, and no errors for 3 hours.

I almost wonder if the memory not being seated (minimal dust on the pins) would cause my Windows installation to be corrupt.

The minidump folder is attached.

If you are willing to throw some advice. Thanks-in-advance!

http://www.mediafire.../?ir3xa66r2gdg2
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#2
phillipcorcoran

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Bad or improperly seated RAM can certainly cause frequent BSODS due to data corruption.
If the RAM contacts are clean & properly seated now, but you're still getting same BSODS, you need to test the RAM with a utility called Memtest86 from here: http://memtest86.com/

Download the "Bootable CD ISO" and create a CD with it using burning software that can write the contents of the ISO file to a CD-R.
Such software includes "nero burning rom" or "Easy Media Creator", or there's a small, free utility called "ImageBurn" here: http://www.imgburn.com/

Whether ImageBurn will run on 64-bit Windows 7 I can't say, but if you have access to another PC you can use that instead just to create the CD.
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#3
TheRagnarok

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Bad or improperly seated RAM can certainly cause frequent BSODS due to data corruption.
If the RAM contacts are clean & properly seated now, but you're still getting same BSODS, you need to test the RAM with a utility called Memtest86 from here: http://memtest86.com/

Download the "Bootable CD ISO" and create a CD with it using burning software that can write the contents of the ISO file to a CD-R.
Such software includes "nero burning rom" or "Easy Media Creator", or there's a small, free utility called "ImageBurn" here: http://www.imgburn.com/

Whether ImageBurn will run on 64-bit Windows 7 I can't say, but if you have access to another PC you can use that instead just to create the CD.


I've already ran Memtest86 (I booted from a flash drive) and it reported no errors for 3 hours straight.

And today I installed Windows 7 32-bit.

An I recieved this BSOD after being on desktop for about 10 minutes (I was running Windows Update and it BSODd while intalling the updates).

The program WhoCrashed reported this:

On Wed 1/19/2011 3:40:15 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\memory.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntkrpamp.exe (nt!KeBugCheckEx+0x1E)
Bugcheck code: 0x7E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005, 0xFFFFFFFFC0000001, 0xFFFFFFFF92AFBB78, 0xFFFFFFFF92AFB750)
Error: SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
Bug check description: This bug check indicates that a system thread generated an exception that the error handler did not catch.
A third party driver was identified as the probable root cause of this system error. It is suggested you look for an update for the following driver: ntkrpamp.exe .
Google query: ntkrpamp.exe SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

^32-bit
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Tue 1/18/2011 3:05:55 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011811-26941-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: tcpip.sys (tcpip+0x3404D)
Bugcheck code: 0xD1 (0xFFFFF8001CB9C048, 0x2, 0x1, 0xFFFFF8800163404D)
Error: DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
file path: C:\Windows\system32\drivers\tcpip.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: TCP/IP Driver
Bug check description: This indicates that a kernel-mode driver attempted to access pageable memory at a process IRQL that was too high.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system which cannot be identified at this time.


On Fri 1/14/2011 1:54:08 AM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011311-20014-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntoskrnl.exe (nt+0x70740)
Bugcheck code: 0x1E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005, 0xFFFFF80002D81CA0, 0x1, 0x0)
Error: KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
file path: C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: NT Kernel & System
Bug check description: This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver which cannot be identified at this time.


On Thu 1/13/2011 3:27:19 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011311-19500-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: fltmgr.sys (fltmgr+0x209A)
Bugcheck code: 0x1E (0xFFFFFFFFC000001D, 0xFFFFF880010EF09A, 0x0, 0xFFFFFA8004088000)
Error: KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
file path: C:\Windows\system32\drivers\fltmgr.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Microsoft Filesystem Filter Manager
Bug check description: This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system which cannot be identified at this time.


On Wed 1/12/2011 4:40:26 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011211-16770-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: win32k.sys (win32k+0x1A4098)
Bugcheck code: 0xC37EC2B8 (0xFFFFF900C37EC2B8, 0xFFFFF9600035CA80, 0x0, 0xFFFFF900C37EC2B8)
Error: CUSTOM_ERROR
file path: C:\Windows\system32\win32k.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Multi-User Win32 Driver
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system which cannot be identified at this time.


On Tue 1/11/2011 11:07:43 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011111-22776-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntoskrnl.exe (nt+0x65012)
Bugcheck code: 0x1000007E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005, 0xFFFFF80002A78012, 0xFFFFF88003140928, 0xFFFFF88003140190)
Error: SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED_M
file path: C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: NT Kernel & System
Bug check description: This indicates that a system thread generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver which cannot be identified at this time.
^64-bit

Thanks for the advice.

Edited by TheRagnarok, 19 January 2011 - 10:11 AM.

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#4
The Admiral

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I have ran memtest and instantly received a crapload of errors, flushed contacts/pins with 99% Isopropyl Alcohol, reseated, and no errors for 3 hours.

Does that mean no errors in memtest or no BSODs? Since cleaning the RAM contacts, have you ran memtest again?

Kinda confused here...
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#5
TheRagnarok

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I have ran memtest and instantly received a crapload of errors, flushed contacts/pins with 99% Isopropyl Alcohol, reseated, and no errors for 3 hours.

Does that mean no errors in memtest or no BSODs? Since cleaning the RAM contacts, have you ran memtest again?

Kinda confused here...


I caused confusion? Sounds like me, lol.

After running Memtest for the 1st time nothing but errors.
Cleaned memory.
Ran Memtest again for 3 hours and it reported no errors.
I would still get BSOD though.
Installed 32-bit Win7, and still the BSOD.
I am going to try Memtest again (this time overnight).

I can see where the line blurs when I mention errors and BSOD (I should have re-read my post).
Thanks for pointing out the problem.
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#6
The Admiral

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Just to make sure you didn't skip a step in your Windows installation... did you download and install drivers after installing windows? Or are you running "vanilla?" If you don't install drivers, often times you'll get BSODs because Windows Update either doesn't find an appropriate driver or it gets the wrong one - causing a bluescreen.

If all the drivers are installed correctly and you are still bluescreening after a fresh install of both 32-bit and 64-bit, we can start looking at hardware.
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#7
TheRagnarok

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Just to make sure you didn't skip a step in your Windows installation... did you download and install drivers after installing windows? Or are you running "vanilla?" If you don't install drivers, often times you'll get BSODs because Windows Update either doesn't find an appropriate driver or it gets the wrong one - causing a bluescreen.

If all the drivers are installed correctly and you are still bluescreening after a fresh install of both 32-bit and 64-bit, we can start looking at hardware.

Ok, I re-installed Windows 7 x64 today,
I manually installed the drivers from ASUS support(I skipped some of the unimportant ones -card reader-),
And I Didn't let Windows Update download any drivers or updates yet.
It has been stable for 3 hours, NO BSODs so far, Woot!!!.
I'm going to install JUST THE IMPORTANT updates from Windows Update (NOT THE DRIVERS, LOL)
I'm off to class for an hour, I'll repost when class lets out.
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#8
TheRagnarok

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Just to make sure you didn't skip a step in your Windows installation... did you download and install drivers after installing windows? Or are you running "vanilla?" If you don't install drivers, often times you'll get BSODs because Windows Update either doesn't find an appropriate driver or it gets the wrong one - causing a bluescreen.

If all the drivers are installed correctly and you are still bluescreening after a fresh install of both 32-bit and 64-bit, we can start looking at hardware.

Ok, I re-installed Windows 7 x64 today,
I manually installed the drivers from ASUS support(I skipped some of the unimportant ones -card reader-),
And I Didn't let Windows Update download any drivers or updates yet.
It has been stable for 3 hours, NO BSODs so far, Woot!!!.
I'm going to install JUST THE IMPORTANT updates from Windows Update (NOT THE DRIVERS, LOL)
I'm off to class for an hour, I'll repost when class lets out.


Ok, I'm back in my campus library (where I did the re-installation of Windows, lol)
And the laptop has been running solid for 30 mins. Here is a screen cap of the drivers/updates that I skipped.
Thanks for all the help. I'm going to play some Team Fortress 2 now :> (hopefully)
Posted Image
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#9
The Admiral

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Question: Have you manually installed your Wi-Fi driver? Can you access the internet? Windows Update shows a wi-fi driver update available. If you installed a driver from ASUS and everything is working fine but Windows Update shows an updated driver, it is likely that that "updated" driver is what was causing the problem, especially since one of the BSODs was caused by tcpip.sys.

Those updates that show in Windows Update will probably go away once you install the drivers from ASUS (chipset, card reader, Infrared, hard drive). Install one at a time from ASUS and use the computer normally for a while before installing the next driver. If something goes wrong, you'll know exactly which driver it was and be able to remove it from Safe Mode.


Good to hear you are up and running! :D

Edited by The Admiral, 20 January 2011 - 12:28 PM.

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#10
TheRagnarok

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Question: Have you manually installed your Wi-Fi driver? Can you access the internet? Windows Update shows a wi-fi driver update available. If you installed a driver from ASUS and everything is working fine but Windows Update shows an updated driver, it is likely that that "updated" driver is what was causing the problem, especially since one of the BSODs was caused by tcpip.sys.

Those updates that show in Windows Update will probably go away once you install the drivers from ASUS (chipset, card reader, Infrared, hard drive). Install one at a time from ASUS and use the computer normally for a while before installing the next driver. If something goes wrong, you'll know exactly which driver it was and be able to remove it from Safe Mode.


Good to hear you are up and running! :D


The WiFi driver was already included in the Windows 7 installation.
It Blue Screened again after I came home and ran it a little.
What gets me, is me and my brother have the same laptop -Refurbs-(He has the G50VT-X1, and I have the G50VT-X5)
They both came with Vistax64 by default. I loaded Windows 7 x64 onto both machines about 3 months ago.
And his has been running solid since that time without ANY BSODs. >,<
I don't get why mine just suddenly started doing this.
I hope this is the memory and not the GPU (Nvidia 9800M GS) that things not cheap on Ebay.

Also, could any of the "critical" Windows 7 updates have caused this?
Because it ran for 3 hours without any Windows Updates and only the basic drivers.
Here is the report from WhoCrashed

On Thu 1/20/2011 8:44:35 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\012011-19578-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntoskrnl.exe (nt+0x70740)
Bugcheck code: 0x1A (0x5003, 0xFFFFF70001080000, 0x5379, 0x9D1E409)
Error: MEMORY_MANAGEMENT
file path: C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: NT Kernel & System
Bug check description: This indicates that a severe memory management error occurred.
This might be a case of memory corruption. More often memory corruption happens because of software errors in buggy drivers, not because of faulty RAM modules.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver which cannot be identified at this time.


On Thu 1/20/2011 8:44:35 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\memory.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntkrnlmp.exe (nt!KeBugCheckEx+0x0)
Bugcheck code: 0x1A (0x5003, 0xFFFFF70001080000, 0x5379, 0x9D1E409)
Error: MEMORY_MANAGEMENT
Bug check description: This indicates that a severe memory management error occurred.
This might be a case of memory corruption. More often memory corruption happens because of software errors in buggy drivers, not because of faulty RAM modules.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver which cannot be identified at this time.

Edited by TheRagnarok, 20 January 2011 - 03:13 PM.

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#11
The Admiral

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I love it when I learn stuff when I'm helping someone.

Windows 7 has a built-in driver tester program. It's pretty nifty. We can use it to test your drivers, and if anything goes wrong, it will automatically throw a BSOD and log it so we know which driver it is.
Open your start menu with the pearl, and in the search box type in verifier.exe there should only be one result. Press Enter and the Driver Verifier Manager will open. Select Create standard settings and press Next. Select Automatically select all drivers installed on this computer and press the Finish button. It will tell you that you need to restart and close the window.
Close your open programs and restart your computer.
I just ran it on my computer and nothing went wrong. So, if something does go wrong on your laptop, I don't know what it will look like. If it does throw up a BSOD, attach the dump files (the ones that start with 012011) to your next post and we'll figure out what is bugging your computer.
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#12
mrphantuan

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Bad or improperly seated RAM can certainly cause frequent BSODS due to data corruption.
If the RAM contacts are clean & properly seated now, but you're still getting same BSODS, you need to test the RAM with a utility called Memtest86 from here: http://memtest86.com/

Download the "Bootable CD ISO" and create a CD with it using burning software that can write the contents of the ISO file to a CD-R.
Such software includes "nero burning rom" or "Easy Media Creator", or there's a small, free utility called "ImageBurn" here: http://www.imgburn.com/

Whether ImageBurn will run on 64-bit Windows 7 I can't say, but if you have access to another PC you can use that instead just to create the CD.


I've already ran Memtest86 (I booted from a flash drive) and it reported no errors for 3 hours straight.

And today I installed Windows 7 32-bit.

An I recieved this BSOD after being on desktop for about 10 minutes (I was running Windows Update and it BSODd while intalling the updates).

The program WhoCrashed reported this:

On Wed 1/19/2011 3:40:15 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\memory.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntkrpamp.exe (nt!KeBugCheckEx+0x1E)
Bugcheck code: 0x7E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005, 0xFFFFFFFFC0000001, 0xFFFFFFFF92AFBB78, 0xFFFFFFFF92AFB750)
Error: SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
Bug check description: This bug check indicates that a system thread generated an exception that the error handler did not catch.
A third party driver was identified as the probable root cause of this system error. It is suggested you look for an update for the following driver: ntkrpamp.exe .
Google query: ntkrpamp.exe SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

^32-bit
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Tue 1/18/2011 3:05:55 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011811-26941-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: tcpip.sys (tcpip+0x3404D)
Bugcheck code: 0xD1 (0xFFFFF8001CB9C048, 0x2, 0x1, 0xFFFFF8800163404D)
Error: DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
file path: C:\Windows\system32\drivers\tcpip.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: TCP/IP Driver
Bug check description: This indicates that a kernel-mode driver attempted to access pageable memory at a process IRQL that was too high.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system which cannot be identified at this time.


On Fri 1/14/2011 1:54:08 AM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011311-20014-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntoskrnl.exe (nt+0x70740)
Bugcheck code: 0x1E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005, 0xFFFFF80002D81CA0, 0x1, 0x0)
Error: KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
file path: C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: NT Kernel & System
Bug check description: This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver which cannot be identified at this time.


On Thu 1/13/2011 3:27:19 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011311-19500-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: fltmgr.sys (fltmgr+0x209A)
Bugcheck code: 0x1E (0xFFFFFFFFC000001D, 0xFFFFF880010EF09A, 0x0, 0xFFFFFA8004088000)
Error: KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
file path: C:\Windows\system32\drivers\fltmgr.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Microsoft Filesystem Filter Manager
Bug check description: This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system which cannot be identified at this time.


On Wed 1/12/2011 4:40:26 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011211-16770-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: win32k.sys (win32k+0x1A4098)
Bugcheck code: 0xC37EC2B8 (0xFFFFF900C37EC2B8, 0xFFFFF9600035CA80, 0x0, 0xFFFFF900C37EC2B8)
Error: CUSTOM_ERROR
file path: C:\Windows\system32\win32k.sys
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Multi-User Win32 Driver
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system which cannot be identified at this time.


On Tue 1/11/2011 11:07:43 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\011111-22776-01.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: ntoskrnl.exe (nt+0x65012)
Bugcheck code: 0x1000007E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005, 0xFFFFF80002A78012, 0xFFFFF88003140928, 0xFFFFF88003140190)
Error: SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED_M
file path: C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: NT Kernel & System
Bug check description: This indicates that a system thread generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver which cannot be identified at this time.
^64-bit

Thanks for the advice.

I can't understand.......



______________________
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Edited by mrphantuan, 24 January 2011 - 02:31 AM.

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#13
TheRagnarok

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I love it when I learn stuff when I'm helping someone.

Windows 7 has a built-in driver tester program. It's pretty nifty. We can use it to test your drivers, and if anything goes wrong, it will automatically throw a BSOD and log it so we know which driver it is.
Open your start menu with the pearl, and in the search box type in verifier.exe there should only be one result. Press Enter and the Driver Verifier Manager will open. Select Create standard settings and press Next. Select Automatically select all drivers installed on this computer and press the Finish button. It will tell you that you need to restart and close the window.
Close your open programs and restart your computer.
I just ran it on my computer and nothing went wrong. So, if something does go wrong on your laptop, I don't know what it will look like. If it does throw up a BSOD, attach the dump files (the ones that start with 012011) to your next post and we'll figure out what is bugging your computer.



I ran Memtest last night......and no memory errors showed up.
I setup the driver verifier (as you mentioned), and it BSOD'd soon after.
The requested .dmp link is below.
I'm even contemplating Windows XP at this point :D
http://www.mediafire...2aac9d6gt3e6bzh
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#14
The Admiral

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*sigh*...

Try updating your chipset drivers here.
If that doesn't do it, go into your BIOS and try changing your SATA operation mode to Standard IDE or something similar... take it off AHCI and see if it works longer.
If that doesn't do it, check System Restore (in your Start menu, search for System Restore and see if there is a restore date to when the computer was working earlier in the library. Restore, then keep a close eye on Windows Update (and you'll probably want to install those chipset drivers again with that link I gave you above.


Just FYI, the BSOD that you gave back to me was caused by ntkrnlmp.exe in firefox. I'm not convinced it was caused by the driver verifier, try running verifier.exe again to see if it bluescreens. I researched a little bit... the STOP codes that driver verifier throws are 0x000000C4, 0x000000C9, 0x000000E6, 0x000000F1, and 0x000000F6, that shows up under Technical Information: *** STOP:. Keep track of when it bluescreens... what's on the screen, how long into the bootup, if it was quicker than normal. It looks like the BSOD you gave me was after about half an hour of the system running? Does that seem right to you? verifier.exe should have thrown up a blue screen a lot sooner...

Edited by The Admiral, 22 January 2011 - 12:00 PM.

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#15
The Admiral

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Wait... did you run verifier.exe yesterday or today? The dump file you gave me is from yesterday afternoon... run verifier.exe again and then give me the most recent dump file.

Edited by The Admiral, 22 January 2011 - 01:16 AM.

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