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Comptia A+ Study Guide


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#1
jblack215

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Ok this is hardware so I figure this is a good spot to post this. Now most of you that are techs on here and probably got your A+ and some have gone thru Comptia's study guide. So here's my quick question: Is Comptia's study guides like going to school. I mean really -- 1300 pages I would assume. Thanx

I really wanna know because of student loans I can't go back to school and I'm in an online school now for knowledge to pass the exam, but it seems there is much greater material in this one book. But I just don't want to pass the exam, I want to actually be a technician. Can this book do that?? I'm already familiar with computers, but I'm not a professional. Will this book help accomplish that? I know an expert level will be once I get in the field. But I'm not trying just to get my feet wet here. I wanna eat this book! But will it help me grow? I was thinking of the 2009 deluxe edition with the CD and Windows 7 literature.
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#2
BrussleSprouts

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But I just don't want to pass the exam, I want to actually be a technician. Can this book do that??

In short, no. CompTIA even states on their web site that the tests are designed for people with some hands on experience.

CompTIA A+ Essentials measures the necessary competencies of an entry-level IT professional with a recommended 500 hours of hands-on experience in the lab or field. It tests for technical understanding of computer technology, networking and security, as well as the communication skills and professionalism now required of all entry-level IT professionals.


The books will provide you knowledge, maybe even enough to pass the test, but they will not make you a technician. You can only be a technician by being a technician. Now that does not mean you have to find a job fixing computers(though that would be ideal). Build yourself a computer, or fix them for friends and family. Pure 'book smarts' will only get you so far.

I hope that helps :D
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#3
jblack215

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Yea it helps although it's discouraging being I have no money to build a computer or know anyone who wants one. It seems when I say I can help they like "whatever". But thanks for keeping it real wit me with an honest answer. My plan was was to get book smart lol and get certified and then get hands on. But I don't wanna front like I know what I'm doing like you don't have to take it to the shop you can come to me, I wanna be sure I can be confident. But okay man thanx. I'll just rethink this almost $500 (book and test) I was gonna try to get up to do this.
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#4
rshaffer61

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I have been building and repairing systems for almost 15 years now and to be honest I have not one certification or test have I taken.
I practiced the A1 certification and passed it with a 90% on my first try.
The certifications are great if you plan on making a living in computers of some type.
Good old hands on to me was the best way for myself to learn. Just my opinion and I know others will post their opinions also. :D
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#5
jblack215

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Yea I agree greatly. I even thought of finding scrap and seeing what I can create from it, maybe kinda like making it an art. But yea, I'll just have to work on that hands on, but I may still read the book. Would you agree that the book may at least give me all I need to know to start my own hands-on with less reference to research material? And I have thought of the certificate just with a career in mind even tho with no experience my chances are slim.
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#6
rshaffer61

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Would you agree that the book may at least give me all I need to know to start my own hands-on with less reference to research material?

The books will at least get you to understand the way things go together and why. It will also get you comfortable with the components.


And I have thought of the certificate just with a career in mind even tho with no experience my chances are slim.

Yep if you are planning on making a career out of this then certifications will help you there. The one point to make here is there are various aspects of computer careers you can enter so you really need to decide which part of computer work you want to be in.
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#7
jblack215

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Yea I realize that and some don't. I guess since I have no experience in the field I may accept the first place that gives me a shot.
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#8
rshaffer61

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  • I started in this business as a cleanup person in a shop. When I left I was purchasing manager and district manager over 3 stores in the city I lived in. The owner actually opened a shop in Alaska and spent most of his time there.
    My learning was actually all hands on experience working with the then 17 and 18 year old kids who to this day I credit with teaching me so much about computers. It may have helped that I have such a infatuation with them.
  • Real world experience can be worth so much more then all the book smarts you will ever get in my opinion. You can learn a lot of experience by watching and asking questions here at GTG. You might be surprised at the level of expertise the staff as well as many of the members here have and most I would venture to say learned by doing.
  • There are some who do have certificates in their various fields and they are some of the nicest there are. They would probably be more then happy to explain things for you as long as it wasn't doing actual homework.

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#9
jblack215

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You speak as a wise man and I will reflect on your story. I'll keep your name in mind and in the future give you the specs of my first computer I hope to include ASrocks instant boot motherboard and if I do get that certificate. But I'll work on these things regardless if I have the cert or not and I will purchase the book. Nice talking to you. Until then...
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#10
rshaffer61

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FYI we have a great tutorial on building your own system that was created by one of our very own Tech Staff Members. It has step by step instructions along with the pictures so you can see what you should be working on at that time. The tutorial is located HERE and though your components may differ from the pictures the concept is the same in the end. :D
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#11
jblack215

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Cool
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#12
Plastic Nev

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Is there a reliable and good reputation computer repair shop in your area? Could you ask them if they are willing to give you some hands on education as part time, say weekends. If you show any skill they may even pay for your help.

Just a thought.

 

Nev.


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