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Need expert help on first time computer rig


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#1
TroyNguyen

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Hello experts,

This is my first time building a PC, I'm currently looking forward into building a $1000 computer rig.
I am a enthusiast and a light gamer, might be looking forward to high end gaming into the future.


Here is what I have purchases so far without double checking:

  • Case: Cooler Master HAF 922
  • PCU: Cooler Master Silent Pro 600w
  • Mobo: Asus P8P67 Pro B3
  • CPU: Intel core i7 2600k (Sandy Bridge)
  • RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
  • Hard Drive: WD Caviar Black 500gb, intel x25-v 40gb ssd
  • Optical Drive: none
  • Video Card: none
  • CPU Cooler: Cooler Master hyper fan 212 plus

So my current problem is I just found out the mobo does not support any video outputs.
Since my i7 2600k has intergrated video, I am not looking forward to buy a discrete graphics card with my light gaming.
What do you guys suggest I do?


*I looked up the Asus p8z68-v pro and I might want to exchange it for the p67. If I do, would it work for my setup such as the RAM???

Thanks, I might possibly have other questions also!


-Troy
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#2
iammykyl

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Hi TroyNguyen :)



*I looked up the Asus p8z68-v pro


Yes, a Z68 platform will give you access to all the features of the 2600K including integrated graphics.

Asus does not have many boards available at the moment.
You could look on the Asrock site to give you more options.
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#3
Digerati

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If you go out to the motherboard maker's website for a board you are considering, it should should have links to compatible RAM and CPUs for the board.

As far as a card, you need to set a budget then pick a card.

Two other comments. (1) That CPU is a comes with a supplied cooler and is warrantied with the supplied cooler. Using a 3rd party cooler is in violation of the terms of the Warranty. So if that matters, stick with the OEM supplied fan, they are quite good.

And (2), I don't see an operating system listed. Note that only "full Retail" licenses are transferable from older computers - if you were thinking of using Windows from an older computer, it cannot be an OEM version.
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#4
TroyNguyen

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Hi TroyNguyen :)



*I looked up the Asus p8z68-v pro


Yes, a Z68 platform will give you access to all the features of the 2600K including integrated graphics.

Asus does not have many boards available at the moment.
You could look on the Asrock site to give you more options.


So I don't need a GPU with this rig, correct?



If you go out to the motherboard maker's website for a board you are considering, it should should have links to compatible RAM and CPUs for the board.

As far as a card, you need to set a budget then pick a card.

Two other comments. (1) That CPU is a comes with a supplied cooler and is warrantied with the supplied cooler. Using a 3rd party cooler is in violation of the terms of the Warranty. So if that matters, stick with the OEM supplied fan, they are quite good.

And (2), I don't see an operating system listed. Note that only "full Retail" licenses are transferable from older computers - if you were thinking of using Windows from an older computer, it cannot be an OEM version.


I'm not really looking forward to using a GPU at all, only the integrated graphics.

I'm planning on OC the system so I've been recommended to use a third party cooler, I guess I don't mind not having warranty.

and for the OS, I was wondering if I could install windows 7 using a usb? That's why I did not choose to get a dvd/cd optical drive.

Edited by TroyNguyen, 18 May 2011 - 02:23 PM.

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#5
iammykyl

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So I don't need a GPU with this rig, correct?


Correct.
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#6
TroyNguyen

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So I don't need a GPU with this rig, correct?


Correct.


Thanks
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#7
Digerati

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Whoa! :) Hold on! You guys are not thinking - or doing your homework.

So I don't need a GPU with this rig, correct?

Correct.


That is incorrect! Just because a CPU maker can include integrated graphics support into a CPU, that IN NO WAY suggests or requires the motherboard maker to include integrated graphics in every one of their boards that supports that CPU! As buyers, and advisors, we MUST do our homework before spending our, or someone else's money.

Regardless if integrated or card, you need to know if the graphics solution will support your monitor or monitors, right? You have to do your homework. What does your monitor need? Do you need dual-monitor support? Digital or analog? What resolution? What type connections does your monitor need? HDMI? D-Sub? DVI?

Then what does your graphics solution, in this case, the motherboard provide? A quick check of the P8P67 Pro Specifications shows it provides nothing!!!? ASUS chose not to include integrated graphics on that board.

I ALWAYS download the user manual when possible before buying and before advising too. No where in the manual does it say you have integrated graphics, nor are there any HDMI, DVI, or D-Sub ports to connect a monitor to.

Therefore, as I said earlier, "you need to set a budget and pick a card!"

And besides, while integrated graphics have come a long way in the last couple years, and can even provide adequate gaming support, with 8Gb of RAM and the i7 CPU, even the best integrated will likely be a bottleneck.
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#8
Digerati

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and for the OS, I was wondering if I could install windows 7 using a usb? That's why I did not choose to get a dvd/cd optical drive.

Depends on the license. What kind is it? How was it purchased - that is, with hardware, separately?
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#9
TroyNguyen

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Whoa! :) Hold on! You guys are not thinking - or doing your homework.

So I don't need a GPU with this rig, correct?

Correct.


That is incorrect! Just because a CPU maker can include integrated graphics support into a CPU, that IN NO WAY suggests or requires the motherboard maker to include integrated graphics in every one of their boards that supports that CPU! As buyers, and advisors, we MUST do our homework before spending our, or someone else's money.

Regardless if integrated or card, you need to know if the graphics solution will support your monitor or monitors, right? You have to do your homework. What does your monitor need? Do you need dual-monitor support? Digital or analog? What resolution? What type connections does your monitor need? HDMI? D-Sub? DVI?

Then what does your graphics solution, in this case, the motherboard provide? A quick check of the P8P67 Pro Specifications shows it provides nothing!!!? ASUS chose not to include integrated graphics on that board.

I ALWAYS download the user manual when possible before buying and before advising too. No where in the manual does it say you have integrated graphics, nor are there any HDMI, DVI, or D-Sub ports to connect a monitor to.

Therefore, as I said earlier, "you need to set a budget and pick a card!"

And besides, while integrated graphics have come a long way in the last couple years, and can even provide adequate gaming support, with 8Gb of RAM and the i7 CPU, even the best integrated will likely be a bottleneck.



Do you recommend not returning the p67 and get a cheap GPU?
OR
Exchange it and get Asus p8z68-v pro motherboard w/o GPU?

I'm planning on using hdmi for my monitor
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#10
Digerati

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Do you recommend not returning the p67 and get a cheap GPU?
OR
Exchange it and get Asus p8z68-v pro motherboard w/o GPU?

I don't know what you mean by "w/o GPU". The P8Z68-V has integrated graphics, therefore, it has a GPU.

Perhaps we need to address terminology to ensure no misunderstanding. The "GPU" or graphics processing unit is just a single device. It is a CPU, but designed for graphics. You don't replace or add a GPU. You can add or replace a graphics card, but you don't add a GPU. Motherboards with on-board or integrated graphics basically have all the components normally found on a graphics card mounted on the motherboard - integrated graphics is not just a GPU.

So instead of saying "GPU", please differentiate by saying "on-board" (or integrated) graphics, or add-on card.

To me, I see little reason to spend a lot of money on a motherboard - and over $200 is a lot. I would rather put my money in RAM, CPU, and a graphics card.

Also, not sure you can return the motherboard - unless it is bad - so you may have to live with what you got. However, that does not suggest you have to live with inferior quality - you have selected good stuff.
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#11
TroyNguyen

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Do you recommend not returning the p67 and get a cheap GPU?
OR
Exchange it and get Asus p8z68-v pro motherboard w/o GPU?

I don't know what you mean by "w/o GPU". The P8Z68-V has integrated graphics, therefore, it has a GPU.

Perhaps we need to address terminology to ensure no misunderstanding. The "GPU" or graphics processing unit is just a single device. It is a CPU, but designed for graphics. You don't replace or add a GPU. You can add or replace a graphics card, but you don't add a GPU. Motherboards with on-board or integrated graphics basically have all the components normally found on a graphics card mounted on the motherboard - integrated graphics is not just a GPU.

So instead of saying "GPU", please differentiate by saying "on-board" (or integrated) graphics, or add-on card.

To me, I see little reason to spend a lot of money on a motherboard - and over $200 is a lot. I would rather put my money in RAM, CPU, and a graphics card.

Also, not sure you can return the motherboard - unless it is bad - so you may have to live with what you got. However, that does not suggest you have to live with inferior quality - you have selected good stuff.


Yeah sorry, I meant to say a discrete graphics card.

Well, you see, I'm not planning on doing much gaming so I don't really need a graphics card for my integrated processor.
I figure it will save me more money than buying a motherboard with a discrete graphics card.
Thanks so much for your help.
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#12
Digerati

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Well, you see, I'm not planning on doing much gaming so I don't really need a graphics card for my integrated processor.
I figure it will save me more money than buying a motherboard with a discrete graphics card.

We are still getting mixed up on terminology. A pain I know, but whether it be medicine, auto mechanics, or computers, "thingamabob" does not ensure good understanding.

To be sure, if you are not a gamer, then an on-board (also called integrated) graphic solution will definitely serve you well, assuming the on-board supports your monitor with the necessary digital or analog support. There are many excellent integrated graphics solutions MORE than fully capable of supporting most computing needs, are are often used in Home Theater PCs with full HD 1080P high definition video, flawlessly, even with BluRay.

So, if you are looking to save some money by not buying a graphics card, and going with the [/url=http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z68V_PRO/#specifications]P8Z68-V Pro[/url]then no problem. You can always add a card a year or two down the road, if you wish.

You mention HDMI - note that the video signal with HDMI and DVI are exactly the same. The primary difference is HDMI carries surround sound audio too. Unless you are using a monitor with built in speakers, it is not likely you need the audio content in HDMI. Therefore, if DVI is the only digital option, DVI to HDMI adapters for video content are cheap and work just fine.

My apologies if I jumped in to hard earlier- I did not want any money spent by mistake and it was not clear to me which board was being considered.
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#13
iammykyl

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So, if you are looking to save some money by not buying a graphics card, and going with the [/url=http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z68V_PRO/#specifications]P8Z68-V Pro[/url]then no problem. You can always add a card a year or two down the road, if you wish.

You mention HDMI - note that the video signal with HDMI and DVI are exactly the same. The primary difference is HDMI carries surround sound audio too. Unless you are using a monitor with built in speakers, it is not likely you need the audio content in HDMI. Therefore, if DVI is the only digital option, DVI to HDMI adapters for video content are cheap and work just fine.

My apologies if I jumped in to hard earlier- I did not want any money spent by mistake and it was not clear to me which board was being considered.


Thank you for clearing that up.

Exchange it and get Asus p8z68-v pro motherboard w/o GPU?


I would contact customer support regarding a RMA, explaining that you wish to make an exchange as you had not realised the P67 Motherboard did not give you access to the SB graphics.
You may have to pay a restocking fee.
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#14
TroyNguyen

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Well, you see, I'm not planning on doing much gaming so I don't really need a graphics card for my integrated processor.
I figure it will save me more money than buying a motherboard with a discrete graphics card.

We are still getting mixed up on terminology. A pain I know, but whether it be medicine, auto mechanics, or computers, "thingamabob" does not ensure good understanding.

To be sure, if you are not a gamer, then an on-board (also called integrated) graphic solution will definitely serve you well, assuming the on-board supports your monitor with the necessary digital or analog support. There are many excellent integrated graphics solutions MORE than fully capable of supporting most computing needs, are are often used in Home Theater PCs with full HD 1080P high definition video, flawlessly, even with BluRay.

So, if you are looking to save some money by not buying a graphics card, and going with the [/url=http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z68V_PRO/#specifications]P8Z68-V Pro[/url]then no problem. You can always add a card a year or two down the road, if you wish.

You mention HDMI - note that the video signal with HDMI and DVI are exactly the same. The primary difference is HDMI carries surround sound audio too. Unless you are using a monitor with built in speakers, it is not likely you need the audio content in HDMI. Therefore, if DVI is the only digital option, DVI to HDMI adapters for video content are cheap and work just fine.

My apologies if I jumped in to hard earlier- I did not want any money spent by mistake and it was not clear to me which board was being considered.



I suppose I can use either DVI or HDMI, my monitor takes both.

Don't worry about it, and thanks for looking out for me and thanks for clearing all that up, I appreciate your time of helping me!

Now my main concern is whether I should overclock my system or not. If I were to overclock, would I need more fans?
SO far I have Cooler Master HAF 922 case with Cooler Master hyper fan 212 plus.



I would contact customer support regarding a RMA, explaining that you wish to make an exchange as you had not realised the P67 Motherboard did not give you access to the SB graphics.
You may have to pay a restocking fee.

I ordered it from Amazon then I called them for a return and say that it was incompatible with the system rig that I am building.
I looked at my RMA and it says that the reason is "defective/did not work"..lol
So I guess I got away with the restocking fee.

But I just ordered my z68 and it's shipping out soon :)
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#15
iammykyl

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Hi.

Now my main concern is whether I should overclock my system or not. If I were to overclock, would I need more fans?
SO far I have Cooler Master HAF 922 case with Cooler Master hyper fan 212 plus.


I see you noted Digerati's warning about overclocking.

I would wait and see how your system performs, using the stock cooler, then if you feel like overclocking.
Use the stock cooler, monitor temps and performance and if still not Happy, install a third party cooler.

The HAF 922 gets very good reviews and benchmarks using the default installed fans, so I think the same as for overclocking, see how it performs before adding fans.

The one thing I would look at is whether the fans are Pulse-width modulation or manual, (the stock CPU one will be PWM) I usually swap fans to PWM, (where I can connect them to a 4 pin fan header on the Mobe) so I can control them through software.

So I guess I got away with the restocking fee



:) And you were not cheating them. I know that Newegg has great service and nice to see Amazon getting there.
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