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First time building my own computer.


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#1
yoda76

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Hey Geekstogo. After many frustrations with DELL and with Battlefield 3 coming out later this year, I have decided to build my own system. I have never built a system so suggestions or pointers would be very helpful.

Here is what I have.

Processor: i5-2400 Sandy Bridge 3.1 GHz
http://www.newegg.co...5-074-_-Product


Video Card: EVGA Geforce GTX 465
http://www.newegg.co...0-557-_-Product


RAM: Corsair xms3 240 pin DDR3 (6x2gb)
http://www.newegg.co...5-235-_-Product


Power Supply: Corsair 750w
http://www.newegg.co...-_-YT17-139-021


Motherboard: ASRock LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6gb/s USB 3.0
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16813157229


Fan: 92mm Fluid Dynamic Cooling fan
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16835186134


Hard Drive: 1TB 7200rpm SATA3
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16822152185


Optical Drive: Samsung DVD Drive
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16827151175


Case: Antec 900 Black Steel ATX
http://www.newegg.co...9-021-_-Product


Operating System: Windows 7


As far as assembling this computer, will I need to wear any special gloves or work on a specific surface? Just wondering.
Thankyou!

Edited by yoda76, 05 June 2011 - 09:03 PM.

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#2
iammykyl

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Hi Yoda76.

As far as assembling this computer, will I need to wear any special gloves or work on a specific surface? Just wondering.


No gloves required, just try not to touch the exposed circuits on compounds because,

1. Oils from your hands can cause problems.

2. Static electricity stored in your body can destroy components so you need to take anti static measures.

Always turn of at the power point before working on the PC. Wear an anti static wristband, or as I do, touch a bare, unpainted part of the chassis, even when handling part not attached to the PC.

work on a well lighted flat (non metallic) surface. I cover with a clean Cotton white sheet, so I can see the screws I keep loosing.

Motherboard. Asrock is a good choice, good quality, good bang for your buck. I advice moving up to the Z68 platform this would enable you to access every feature on any Sandy bridge CPU you install or upgraded to.

Info, > http://www.bit-tech....l-z68-chipset/1
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#3
yoda76

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Thanks for the info! I assume everything else checks out ok.

I read the article you posted, very informative. Just to make sure, is this the upgrade you mentioned: http://www.newegg.co...7-250-_-Product
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#4
Digerati

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Do understand that Intel and AMD boxed retail packages sold with an OEM supplied heatsink fan assembly are sold and expected to be used as a "unit", and using a 3rd party cooler violates the terms of the warranties. If your 3-year warranty is not a concern, then no big deal. But it is important to be aware of the consequences. Note that damage that can be attributed to overclocking is not covered either.

Most 3rd party coolers are warrantied for 1 year and do not cover damage to the CPU if they fail. Neither AMD nor Intel want to replace a fan or CPU in the warranty period so they do provide excellent coolers. They may not be the quietest, or the coolest, but they are very reliable and capable coolers. The rest is up to the case cooling.
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#5
iammykyl

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Just to make sure, is this the upgrade you mentioned: http://www.newegg.co...7-250-_-Product


Yes, this is the correct board with similar specs to your original selection. Not intending to make things complicated, if you do not think you would be installing 2 video cards? you could go for a Mobo with 1 PCI-e slot and save some money.

Your selected RAM is triple channel, you will need Duel channel. Unless you were performing intensive video or photo work, 8GB of ram is more than enough for your needs. Gaming only needs 4GB.

Consider this, 2 x (2x2GB) total 8GB, > http://www.newegg.co...N82E16820145348

PSU. Your selected is a bit over the top and not modular, you end up with a huge bundle of cables not used which you have to hide away to get good airflow. This 650W is more than you will need. Better performance and modular.

> http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817139012

Cooling. Having regards to Digerati's post, Unless you are determined on overclocking I recommend you stick with the stock cooler, monitor your temps and if you feel you need a different cooler, install it.

If you go with the suggestion there would be a saving which you could use for a second HD, to install the OS on or upgrade to a more powerful CPU.

Get Windows7 64bit OS.

Edited by iammykyl, 06 June 2011 - 11:47 PM.

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#6
yoda76

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Thankyou both for the information. I think I will go with the stock fan and see if I really do need an upgrade later on.

I think I'm going to go ahead with the 2 PCI-e slots just in case I do end up expanding.

Just curious, but what exactly is the difference with dual and triple channel RAM? I do a lot of work in photoshop and game extensively.

So the modular PSU, is just one in which the cables don't get in the way with everything else?

Just because I'm not familiar with Windows 7, which would I need to go with (in terms of gaming), the home, professional, or ultimate?


Thanks again for the help and advice.
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#7
iammykyl

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I think I'm going to go ahead with the 2 PCI-e slots just in case I do end up expanding


In that case you will have to select all your hardware and then resize the PSU at the end.


So the modular PSU, is just one in which the cables don't get in the way with everything else?


yes. Best to keep the inside of the case as clear as possible.


Just curious, but what exactly is the difference with dual and triple channel RAM? I do a lot of work in photoshop and game extensively.



Dual memory kit is 2 sticks (hopefully selected from the same batch) packaged together and sold.
Triple channel kit is 3 sticks ^ ^ ^ packaged together and sold.

The DDR3 standard allows for chip capacities of 512 megabits to 8 gigabits, effectively enabling a maximum memory module size of 16 gigabytes. I think there are some 16gb sticks

Download your user manual from from the Asrock website which will tell you the donfiguration for the ram slots.

INFO. > http://tech.icrontic...channel-memory/

Go to Newegg and do a comparison on Window7 53bit OS packages. I don't think you will require Ultimate.
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#8
iammykyl

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That should be Windows7 64bit.
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#9
Digerati

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Just curious, but what exactly is the difference with dual and triple channel RAM? I do a lot of work in photoshop and game extensively.

It is NOT dual channel or triple channel "RAM". It is dual or triple channel "memory architecture" - a function and design of motherboards, not RAM. So a motherboard will support single, dual or triple channel memory.

There is absolutely nothing special about dual channel RAM or triple channel RAM. Those are simply, and ONLY "marketing" terms used to describe how their RAM is packaged and sold - that is, in sets of two or three.

Understand that dual channel has been around for 10 years or more. In the beginning, RAM was finicky and motherboard memory controllers where not very sophisticated (compared to today). It was common for RAM modules, even the exact same brand and model number, to not play well together in dual-channel mode. The memory controllers of the day were unable to get the two sticks to cooperate in dual-channel mode, so they would kick the motherboard back into single mode.

The problem was, is, and probably always will be caused by Man being unable to create perfection, 100% of the time. No two memory modules are exactly alike. Remember, it takes 1 transistor and 1 capacitor for each "bit" (1 or 0) - so that's 100s of billions of little tiny transistors and capacitors in these RAM sticks - and all it takes is 1 in a sensitive spot... .

So to ensure "identical" sticks did play well together on dual-channel motherboards, RAM makers had to test each stick individually then match, package, and sell the matched pairs together - an expensive process!

Flash forward 10 years. Raw materials are more pure and RAM manufacturing techniques have vastly improved. Man still can't create perfection 100% of the time, but we are getting pretty close. RAM tolerances are so close, they no longer have to be individually tested and matched. I note it is hard to find any brand of RAM that is not warrantied for life. And memory controllers on today's motherboard's are much more capable of forcing mismatched RAM to cooperate. In fact, many of the latest motherboard manuals merely recommend using the same brand, speed and size.

So when selling and buying RAM today, the maker will sell packages of singles, pairs ("marketed" as "dual-channel"), and triplets ("marketed" as "triple-channel"), but the sticks inside are essentially identical sticks that all came from the same pile. Obviously, selling 2 or 3 at a time in a single box is a profitable win for the RAM makers. And it is good for the environment. I hope they are passing some of that savings on to us.

*****

As far as modular PSUs - I am not sold on them. If you chose your case carefully, it will provide good cable management features, like being able to run cables behind the motherboard. But with any case, you can tie back extra cables, or stuff them in an empty drive bay to keep them from restricting air flow, and to look "tidy".

I'm an electronics technician by trade, so I may look at hardware a bit differently. I expect my computer to sit quietly and discreetly off to the size so aesthetics take a backseat with me and that's about all I see modulars PSUs good for. But also, I have several problems with modular PSUs, from an electronics standpoint.

  • ANY time you have a break in a conductor, you increase resistance in the circuit. On a modular power supply, each modular connection introduces three breaks (source wire to male connector, male connector to female connector, female connector to destination (wire, circuit board, transformer winding, etc.). Three unnecessary breaks, potential points of failure.
  • ANY time you have a semi-permanent mechanical connection (such as a plug and socket connection) - ESPECIALLY a connection that is not sealed and is in a windy environment, containments such as moisture, dust, smoke, hair, hair oil, dander, microscopic critters that eat dander (allergy sufferers UNITE!) and the "stuff they leave behind :unsure:, and potato chip crumbs get in the connection and on the contacts, creating not only more resistance, but possible corrosion.
  • Stuff happens. A 4-pin wire-to-wire modular connector has at least 10 parts. The 6 and 8 pins use many more. Even the most reputable brand PSU makers have a failure rate greater than 0. And any connector is subject to damage during manufacturing, transit or user abuse.
  • There is no industry standard for modular cables! So Antec cables may not fit a Corsair PSU. OCZ 350W cables may not fit OCZ 850W PSU. This means you must keep track of each set of cables individually, and carefully for every PSU you are responsible for - that's a real PITA if you are responsible for several or more computers. Where do you store the cables you don't use? Users (even experts) lose installation disks, license keys. Things get lost during moves or accidentally tossed, or buried under years of old computer junk. What does the user do 4 years from now when the new graphics card he buys needs a separate power cable and he can't find the cables? The only safe place is in a big ziplock bag stuffed inside the bottom of the case. :)
  • Finally, modular PSUs cost more yet provide absolutely no extra power for the money and do absolutely nothing for the PC's performance. At best, all I'm paying for is it looking a little nicer inside - if I shine a flashlight up there. Not worth it to me. I only look inside my case once a month to make sure my fans are spinning and the air filter is doing its job. Otherwise, I'm looking at my monitors. I'd rather put my money in more RAM or better graphics, or a case with better cable management.

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