Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Going for my first build, please please advise


  • Please log in to reply

#1
VegetaSsj

VegetaSsj

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts


Hello,
This is my first post in this community so I would like to say a big HI and a thank you for the helpful posts that helped me in my researches, especially the pinned how to build your own computer post :) It made me feel much more relaxed about this whole endeavor.

So, before I go ahead and buy everything I would really appreciate if you guys could drop some comments and advice about the build that i am going for, whether there is anything incompatible or unworkable, or anything that needs fixing.


So here it goes:

Case
Cooler Master Centurion 5
Motherboard
Asus Rampage III Formula
CPU
Intel i7 960 "Bloomfield"
RAM
Corsair Vengeance 16GB 1600 mhz
OR
Corsair Dominator 8 GB 1866 mhz
I am still debating between 1600 vs 1866 mhz ram speeds, and whether 16gb is too much for my build.
GPU
nVidia GTX 560 TI
HDD Drive
Intel 510 series 120 GB Solid State Drive
PSU
Thermaltake ToughPower 750W
OR
Same brand but 675W, I still am not sure... Please advise!!!!!!!
BD-ROM
Asus 12x bd-rom

While I have never built a computer myself, I have seen friends do it a long time ago in high school, when I was a hardcore gamer. And I still am a gamer haha, but rather than spending $5000 on a high end system, I want to build one myself which seems to be a lot cheaper.

Thank you.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
16Gb is not too much "for your build", but 16Gb is a huge amount of RAM. Many would argue that 8Gb is more than enough and any performance gains with another 8Gb would be insignificant for the money.

That case is well built but I personally will never get a case that does not have removable, washable air filters. Also, if the case is going to sit on or near the floor, it will not be long before you get tired bending over to reach all the switches, and the USB and headphone/mic jacks that are on or near the floor too.

I don't see an OS listed. If planning on using an OS from another computer, it MUST be a full "Retail" license. An OEM license that came with or was bought for another computer is NOT transferable to a new computer. Also, since you are getting more than 4Gb of RAM, you must get a 64-bit OS to take advantage of that RAM.

Either PSU will work (Note you said 750W but linked to a 775W) but since both are 80 Plus Bronze and the 775W is currently on sale for the same price as the 675, get the 775W. For the record, I am not a fan of modular PSUs. They allow for a tidier interior but, modular supplies,
  • Cost more,
  • Exposed/unused connections get dirty, which can affect electrical connectivity,
  • Connectors can get worn out or broken, which can affect electrical connectivity,
  • Unused cables must be stored somewhere, potentially for years without getting lost or damaged,
  • There is no industry standard for modular connections so each maker tends to use their own proprietary design,
  • Multiple modular PSUs spare cables cannot be mixed,
  • Storing and separating cables from several modular PSUs can be a burden,
  • Replacing lost proprietary cables may be expensive, if possible at all.
What often happens then is the spare cables are then bundled and tossed in the bottom of the case, collecting dust and not being so tidy. So a case that offers better cable management and a wired PSU may be something to consider. That said, with a little care, none of the above may matter.
  • 0

#3
VegetaSsj

VegetaSsj

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Thanks for that thorough reply!

I have never had experience with air filters, so I am confused on how they work. Are they like separate kits attached to the fans or something?
(Like this one??)
The main reason why I chose that particular case is because it's made of aluminum with psu mounted on top, and has a side air duct. That makes me think the case is good enough for good airflow and heat dissipation.
So I just feel safer in getting that particular case, for a first build.
But if you can suggest a case with removable air filters that would be great! Thanks so much nonetheless!

I am gonna look more into the PSUs, that's the last item on my list I haven't thoroughly checked.

P.S. OS is gonna be windows 7.
  • 0

#4
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
Filters that come with cases look similar to what you linked to - depends on the case maker. Typically, they just slide out and slide in for easy cleaning.

Aluminum cases are not anything special. It was first thought because aluminum conducts heat better that they would keep the electronics cooler. But history has shown that is just marketing fluff. Adequate air "flow" is what you need. And sadly, too many cheap aluminum cases started to appear that were flimsy and structurally weak that they flexed and warped so much, they put undue stress on the motherboard mounting points. A good aluminum case has significant reinforcements in the corners and bends to ensure the bends stay "true" - exactly 90°. Also marketing fluff was their weight. While true an aluminum case is lighter, once you load it up with heavy drives, the power supply and everything else, a couple pounds made little difference on your back when lugging it outside to blast out the dust.

I like Antec cases and the Three Hundred is a popular one. I am not a fan of fancy lights because they do nothing for performance and I tend to pay attention to what's on my monitors. But they can always be disabled.

The PSU is one of the most important purchasing decisions and should be the last decision you make. This is because you need to determine the power requirements of all your selected components first before you can determine the size PSU you need.

Note that most computer parts makers have the manuals available on-line for downloading. This allows you to download the manual before buying (or while waiting for delivery) to become familiar ahead of time with installation and setup procedures, features and how they work.

Windows 7 is great - just make sure you buy 64-bit Windows 7 to support all your RAM. If you buy a Retail license, it will come with both versions in the box (but you can only install one). If you buy the cheaper OEM/System Builder, you must select 64-bit or else you may get 32-bit.
  • 0

#5
VegetaSsj

VegetaSsj

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Wow this is incredible, I just went through the rampage III manual... I didn't know you could get the manuals online! Thanks a bunch man, you are the best!

I actually like that antec 300 case... I am actually a fan of those neon-looking, fancy lights haha. They look amazing in a dim room. Might actually go for this case.
But yeah I am aiming for a good airflow case. As long as the case supports and maintains the components I don't care how it looks. Unless it's really [bleep] looking.

I actually used this site for the psu requirement thing. I came at like 550W (529W to be exact), so I figure 775W will do, just in case.

Anyways, thanks a lot man you have been a lot of help, really! the 64-bit, ram.... lots of info, and you have no idea what that means for a newbie like me haha. Come Friday and I am buying the motherboard and case with my paycheck! :)
  • 0

#6
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
Sounds like a plan. Make sure you read the motherboard manual concerning ESD control and standoff placement (also in case manual). And that is the calculator I use all the time.

When budget allows, I recommend all computers be on a "good" UPS with AVR - automatic voltage regulation. Because a surge and spike protector is little more than a fancy and expensive extension cord.

Good luck.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP