Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

DDR3 wasters on a 775 mobo?


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Baldyloxxx

Baldyloxxx

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts
I just read somewhere that ddr3 is pretty much wasted on a 775 mobo, is this true? I am looking to buy a new mobo and am stumped at what to go for really.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Baldyloxxx

Baldyloxxx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts
The title is suposed to say wasted btw.
  • 0

#3
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
No it is not true. If the motherboard supports DDR3 RAM, then using DDR3 is not a waste.

Got a link to what you read?

As far as a new motherboard, that typically requires new RAM, a new CPU, and a new operating system license.
  • 0

#4
Baldyloxxx

Baldyloxxx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts
It doesnt need a new liscence surely. Ive moved a harddrive to another pc, and indeed an OS to another hard drive and ive never had to get a new liscence. Just reregister with the old key.
  • 0

#5
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

It doesnt need a new liscence surely. Ive moved a harddrive to another pc, and indeed an OS to another hard drive and ive never had to get a new liscence. Just reregister with the old key.

Being technically able, and legally able are two different things. If the license is an OEM/System Builders license, then it is tied to the old "original" hardware - specifically, the motherboard and that specific computer becomes the "licensed computer". And in that case, it is NEVER legal to transfer to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard as that constitutes a new computer) - regardless of the fact you can physically do it. It would be like moving the license plate from one car to another. You can physically do it, but it is not legal. With OEM licenses, it is, technically, stealing software! These terms are in the EULA we agree to abide by when we install the software and click OK to proceed.

On the other hand, if the license is a full "Retail" license that came in a "Retail" labeled box from a store, then you are perfectly legal to transfer it to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard) over and over again as many times as you want - as long as the OS is completely removed from the old computer.

Remember, when we buy software, we are not really buying the disk or the downloaded file (that is just the "media" it is distributed by) - we are buying the license to use it.

That is exactly why Microsoft sells OEM and Retail versions of Windows licenses - so users have the option.
  • 0

#6
Baldyloxxx

Baldyloxxx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts

It doesnt need a new liscence surely. Ive moved a harddrive to another pc, and indeed an OS to another hard drive and ive never had to get a new liscence. Just reregister with the old key.

Being technically able, and legally able are two different things. If the license is an OEM/System Builders license, then it is tied to the old "original" hardware - specifically, the motherboard and that specific computer becomes the "licensed computer". And in that case, it is NEVER legal to transfer to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard as that constitutes a new computer) - regardless of the fact you can physically do it. It would be like moving the license plate from one car to another. You can physically do it, but it is not legal. With OEM licenses, it is, technically, stealing software! These terms are in the EULA we agree to abide by when we install the software and click OK to proceed.

On the other hand, if the license is a full "Retail" license that came in a "Retail" labeled box from a store, then you are perfectly legal to transfer it to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard) over and over again as many times as you want - as long as the OS is completely removed from the old computer.

Remember, when we buy software, we are not really buying the disk or the downloaded file (that is just the "media" it is distributed by) - we are buying the license to use it.

That is exactly why Microsoft sells OEM and Retail versions of Windows licenses - so users have the option.


Well, for the over inflated prices we have to pay in the uk for things, i wouldnt loose sleep over using my os on another pc!

And to reply to your first post, I realised a lot of the threads i was veiwing were quite old when ddr3 first came out. Many people it appeared had cpu's that couldnt fully utilise the FSB (i think i got that right?)
  • 0

#7
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

i wouldnt loose sleep over using my os on another pc!

Well, people don't loose sleep over stealing music via torrents or P2P sites either - until the RIAA decides to make an example of them and they face 5 years in jail and $25,000 in fine, for each stolen tune. The same can happen with illegal software. So you really should care. If you don't like Microsoft's prices, show them by not using their products, not by stealing their software.

If you don't wish to comply with copyright infringement laws or buy a lega copy, then note there are many free, and perfectly legal Linux alternatives that are fully capable operating systems.

Many people it appeared had cpu's that couldnt fully utilise the FSB (i think i got that right?)

It's not really up to the CPU. The CPU does not care if DDR2 or DDR3 - doesn't even know actually. It's all up to the motherboard and chipset. In other words, the CPU must be compatible with the motherboard. And the RAM must be compatible with the motherboard. It is not a matter of the CPU being compatible with the RAM.
  • 0

#8
Baldyloxxx

Baldyloxxx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts

i wouldnt loose sleep over using my os on another pc!

Well, people don't loose sleep over stealing music via torrents or P2P sites either - until the RIAA decides to make an example of them and they face 5 years in jail and $25,000 in fine, for each stolen tune. The same can happen with illegal software. So you really should care. If you don't like Microsoft's prices, show them by not using their products, not by stealing their software.

If you don't wish to comply with copyright infringement laws or buy a lega copy, then note there are many free, and perfectly legal Linux alternatives that are fully capable operating systems.

Many people it appeared had cpu's that couldnt fully utilise the FSB (i think i got that right?)

It's not really up to the CPU. The CPU does not care if DDR2 or DDR3 - doesn't even know actually. It's all up to the motherboard and chipset. In other words, the CPU must be compatible with the motherboard. And the RAM must be compatible with the motherboard. It is not a matter of the CPU being compatible with the RAM.


I think they were taking bout the extra speed of the ddr3 not making much difference to a pc that is limited by the speed of the CPU. I'm not talking compatabilty here I'm asking if it makes a whole lot of difference.

As regards to the whole OS thing, as far as I'm concerned or care I have brought my OS fair and square with my pc. Therefore I own it. I'm sure if I went and put my engine in a different car BMW wouldn't come knocking saying 'excuse me but that's theft'.
MS have enough to worry about with people actually downloading illegal copies of os's without worrying about dan who's just stuck his hDD in a different pc! Lol yourngetting a little carried away mate ;-)
  • 0

#9
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

I'm not talking compatabilty here I'm asking if it makes a whole lot of difference.

Yes, it does make a big difference. DDR3 is roughly twice as fast and it consumes about 30% less power than DDR2. So definitely, DDR3 is the way to go.

As regards to the whole OS thing, as far as I'm concerned or care I have brought my OS fair and square with my pc. Therefore I own it.

That's the problem. You don't own it. You own the license and you agreed to abide by the license when you decided to use on that machine. And you paid for a "one use" OEM license. You didn't pay for an "unlimited use" full Retail license.

I understand where you are coming from, I am just saying that is not how it works with OEM licenses (and that is an industry policy, not Microsoft's). Swapping engines is not a correct analogy. While that would void your warranty, you are allowed to do that. But you still cannot swap license plates and legally drive that car.

MS have enough to worry about with people actually downloading illegal copies

I agree with on that. While that lost revenue for MS is huge - many $millions every year (and that adds to our costs) - the bigger problem with pirated software (and not just Microsoft software) is malware. Much of the pirated/illegal software (including tunes and videos via torrents and P2P sites) contains malware. And many illegal Windows users fail (out of fear of being caught) to keep their systems updated and patched. These systems are primary targets of badguys, who then use those compromised systems as spamming machines, or they draft them into their bot armies to attack us or to launch DDoS attacks.
  • 0

#10
Baldyloxxx

Baldyloxxx

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts

I'm not talking compatabilty here I'm asking if it makes a whole lot of difference.

Yes, it does make a big difference. DDR3 is roughly twice as fast and it consumes about 30% less power than DDR2. So definitely, DDR3 is the way to go.



thank you! That is what I was looking for.
I'll get a ddr3 mobo then. (but shhhh don't tell MS) lol

Thanks for the help.
  • 0

#11
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

I'll get a ddr3 mobo then.

Yeah. It would not make sense to buy a new motherboard that does not support the latest technology anyway.

I (but shhhh don't tell MS) lol

Oh, I won't. But that does not mean the software police are not already watching. These are public-access forums, after all.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP