Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

learning Linux


  • Please log in to reply

#16
Mr.V

Mr.V

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Hi nice to meet you all i would recommend to try ubuntu first i had tried ubuntu and it worked like [bleep] but far better than other operating systemes and the ubuntu layout is also pretty cool but if you wanna be good in linux i would recommend that you first be good in programming and as the first replier said you should try out for yourself and thats all but never use a wireless modem in linux cause if you do you are doomed :) and yeah you may try open solaris that will do.

Edited by Mr.V, 19 February 2014 - 10:45 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#17
Babbzzz

Babbzzz

    Writing Staff

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 234 posts
As said above. Install Gentoo. You will learn a lot.

I prefer Arch Linux over Gentoo as it is a bit simpler and Gentoo is not worth all that work!
  • 0

#18
98springer

98springer

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 217 posts

I had spent a lot of time playing around with distros like Ubuntu and even spent some time with Opensuse. Personally, I found that I started to learn a lot when I was working with Linux for a purpose, for example working with a distro like Backtrack or trying to setup something like Asterisk. The process of working with tools, most of which are completely operate from the terminal, helped me break the dependency of GUI that I had acquired in Windows; not to say Windows doesn't have none GUI elements.


Absolutely.
The cool thing about Linux is the amount of great "free" stuff available. Google something that you'd like to do with a PC and chances are you'll find a Linux solution that works as good or better than what you're used to in Windows. There's more of an incentive when you get a new toy out of the deal rather than just passing a test. Training and certifications are important but don't postpone your enjoyment.
Have Fun!
  • 0

#19
Shady

Shady

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 200 posts
http://arstechnica.c...ne-this-summer/

link to a free online course from the Linux Foundation :) i signed up already, thought I would share.
  • 0

#20
newessence

newessence

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
Thanks. You guys have a lot of great information. I certainly would not recommend doing what I did, and install Slackware on day one (that was biting off more than I could chew). CentOS was the first version that worked very well for me. I learned alot using that, but I'm aching to try out the members' suggestions, especially Gentoo and those links. I'm also going to retry OpenSUSE when possible. This is going to be a great forum to frequent.
  • 0

#21
NaaYaa

NaaYaa

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts

I would recommend Ubuntu for a beginner. Here is a couple of websites that can help you get started:

 

http://www.debianhel...uk/commands.htm - describes some basics Linux commands

http://linux-bible.com - describes Linux administration


  • 0

#22
Incoming

Incoming

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts

I think that Gentoo is too extensive even for someone learning for the first time, even if they had the documentation in front of them the whole time.. I remember I did the Gentoo install and while I was inclined to finish (I never did get to finish, except when I took a little CS camp at Stevens), I was really just typing what I saw and not taking in any of it.

 

I think that the best way to learn 'Linux' would just to use it. Did you learn how to use Windows or OSX by taking a course on it? I think you probably learned it over time. I would suggest doing this with something like Ubuntu and then testing different distributions. I remember starting using Ubuntu and liking everything being super complicated and battery-harsh, looking sweet... then ending up liking really small window managers and not even using a desktop environment because I loved the simplicity and feeling like I was only using command line.

 

Now I forgot everything. :P


  • 0

#23
TravisJo

TravisJo

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
I have recently discovered Cybrary.it which offeres a variety of IT classes for free, including Linux+. Havent made my way to that class yet, but the others on the site are very in depth
  • 0

#24
imort

imort

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

is there a good place online (class--not books) to learn linux? the more and more i use it, i see how much more you can do w/it compared to Windows. i've checked both local community colleges and they do not offer anything for Linux. even checked Illinois State University, nothing. any help would be appreciated. thank you.

 

Take a look here: https://training.lin...-linux-training

It's official Linux foundation courses and you can pick which one will benefit your needs better.


  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP