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ax1420g-u5832 case swap


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#1
Drakon543

Drakon543

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Hello first post be gentle :)
neway i have an acer ax1420g-u5832 now becuase i already have this computer and im limited on funds so i cant build from scratch i'd like to do a case swap. Its a micro atx form factor and ive never attempted let alone bothered checking on dropping a motherboard like this in a larger case. i'd like a cheap case with a power supply included if possible to make it easy on myself. im thinking around a 450w psu nothing huge im not trying to make a super gaming computer out of this i'd just like to be able to use a graphics card.... stock psu is only 220w. now since ive never thought about doing something like this im probably over thinking this. looking at the case its in the pci-e slot is up top not at the bottom so i'd have to rotate the motherboard? since most of the cases ive been looking at have the slots at the bottom?
either way i found a post somewhere of someone whos already done this which got me into this idea but i cant find it again. I'd like to be able to put a full size graphics card in it plus maybe give it the 8gb of ram the board can handle. ive found some cases that say they are compatable with atx and micro atx boards is that what im looking for or do i need a special case for this board. reason im asking is i mentioned this idea to a friend and he told me to be careful about buying a case some boards wont fit. not sure if he meant make sure i buy a case that is micro atx compatable or my board might be a "special" size.
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16811162059
is one of the cases im looking at says its a mini atx case which im geussing just means its short and the powersupply is at the bottom which rotating my motherboard would put my pci slot right behind it so i cant do that. are the case sides interchangable so i can mount the board the same way im taking it out? but the info on that case is horrible doesnt show the back or the inside so u can get an idea of fitment.
but that was the price i was looking at i dont care if the front falls off or if it looks pretty just need to hold the motherboard 1 hd and 1 dvd multidrive and 1 pci-e graphics card

if that case will work a simple yes will be perfect if it wont any other case suggestions will be awesome.
thank you for your patience
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#2
Digerati

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Hi Drakon and :welcome:

First, understand that a microATX motherboard will fit in any microATX or larger (mid or full ATX) case. The "ATX" form factor standard ensures that. If they don't, then something does not comply with industry standards and that should be well documented.

Also note there is no rotating of motherboards for cases where the PSU sits at the bottom. If you rotate the motherboard, none of the slots, or connectors for the keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, etc. will be aligned with the back of the case.

I would avoid cheap cases that toss in cheap power supplies. High-speed digital electronics require quality power from a quality power supply to ensure stable operation. Also, cheap power supplies tend to be much less efficient than the better ones that are 80 PLUS certified. If you buy that Broadway case, toss the PSU into your spares drawer and use it for testing fans, then get a good PSU from a quality maker - I like Antec and Corsair PSUs.

That said, that Broadway case is still very small, so I don't see where you would gain anything by buying it. Note a case not only protects the components inside from kicks and bumps, the case also has the primary responsibility of providing lots of front-to-back cool air flow through the case. And that Broadway, with support for only 1 case fan, might not provide enough cool air.

Since a good case can support you through many years of upgrades and quality service, and since a good case and a good PSU form a solid foundation for your computer, I recommend you build up your budget until you can afford a good case and PSU.

I like Antec cases for their solid design and features. The Three Hundred is an excellent case because it is solid (does not flex which puts undue stress on the motherboard mounting points), it comes with two large (120 and 140mm) quality fans and provides support for more fans. Plus, it has removable washable air filters - something I insist all my cases have.

Note the graphics solution is often the most power hungry device in your computer so you really should pick out your graphics card before sizing up the PSU. That said, this 430W 80 Plus Corsair right now has a $20 mail in rebate offer meaning you can have it for $25. A really good deal - that expires in a couple days.

I realize you said you want a case with a PSU to make it easy on yourself. Understand installing a PSU is about the easiest hardware installation task there is. MUCH EASIER than installing a motherboard. 4 small screws through the back of the case and it is done except for connecting all the cables - which you have to do whether the PSU is pre-installed or not. So, because so many (not all, but many) case sellers "toss in" a cheap PSU to make the case sell, forget about that and look for a case that meets your needs, then look for a quality PSU that will support your hardware. Remember, the ATX Form Factor standard also dictates that any ATX case will support any ATX PSU too.
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#3
Drakon543

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Well I only have about 100 bucks to spare atm and if it says 500 but really does 400 it still suits my needs if the psu burns out in 6 mons I can replace it and the desk never gets moved and the case will be on a shelf off the floor so I'm not concerned with durability atm I play eve wow and sc2 and atm I can't do nething in eve except float around wow I can play on min everything with 20 fps and sc2 I can barely play at min everything due to the cheap 128mb integrated video card
And sorry for this post being somewhat difficult to read as I posted it from my phone
And I appreciate ur input and I plan on building a real pc later this year but id like to have something usable for now and my wife wants this one later to play sims 3
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#4
Digerati

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Well, if you are going to build a "real" PC later this year, I still think it makes more sense to buy something you know will support you then, and years to come. But, then again, I don't have to live with your wife! ;)
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#5
Drakon543

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Ya she can be tough sometimes but like I said as far as the psu goes I'm too impatient to wait another month and if it burns out it burns out I only really need 400 w so if I need a diff one later this year ill just one a bit more dependable but if I get a better case and psu now it cuts down even more on the graphics card
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#6
Digerati

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if it burns out it burns out

That is a bad position to take - ESPECIALLY with a budget supply. First, a struggling or strained PSU WILL deliver unstable or dirty power to your sensitive devices. This typically results in system crashes, freezes, or sudden reboots and that is hard on all the hardware, and often results in a corrupt hard drive, lost data, and failure to boot.

The worse case and not uncommon scenario when a budget PSU fries is it takes out with it, everything connected to it - to include the motherboard, CPU, RAM and graphics card. Even top quality PSUs (which typically have much better protection circuits to prevent collateral damage) can fail catastrophically.

Your choice, but I would not take it.
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#7
Drakon543

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.... stupid phone closed out my browser and I lost everything I typed but new info psu wasn't the main problem my mobo wouldn't have fit correctly neway so I went a different route since I'm getting some side money I manged to find someone else who managed to find a psu that fits the case hope ur still randomly checking my posts so u can answer this for me :-) athena psu ne good? its only 350 w the one I found but disabling the onboard gpu should free up 20 w or so so about 150w of free power should be plenty for a decent graphics card 69 for the psu leaves me with 30 out of my upg budget plus 50 bucks or so whatever I get paid from this side job for a few hrs of my time and my pickup get myself a 1gb video card I think
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#8
Digerati

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Not sure what you are now asking. But no, Athena is not normally a recommended brand.

Graphics cards can easily be the most power hungry device in your computer. Many require 400W minimum PSUs. Check the card's website.
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