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Can I increase my WLAN speed?


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#1
eyetripoli

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Hi,

I have 20/20Mbit FiOS internet hooked up to the standard Actiontec MI424WR Rev. E. I am running on 802.11g on a channel not used by any other networks in proximity and I have scanned with multiple cards. I tend to get about ~10MBit in both directions at most over the wireless. I'm wondering if someone with knowledge of WLANs can help me get more speed over my network, even at close to 20Mbit. During these times, a speed test done wired will usually be at least 20 each way, going up towards 27Mbit/s.

Thanks.

~ieee
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#2
admin

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802.11g has a "theoretical maximum" of 54 Mbps. In practical applications, 10-30 Mbps is more realistic.

When I had an 802.11g network, 10 Mps was about my average. But my wireless router was not in a very good location, and I was often on a different level of the house. About the only thing you can do is move the router closer, to a more central location, and/or place it higher. You also almost always get better performance if you match components. E.G. a Linksys router, and a Linksys access point. Properly paired 802.11g can double it's bandwidth to 108 Mbps.

Of course the other option is to upgrade your network. 802.11n offers better range, better speed consistency across that range, and higher speeds overall. I've been tempted to try powerline networking. It offers lower latency, better reliability, and often better speeds. Newegg often has refurbished Netgear powerline adapters in stock. They are currently in-stock for $16.99 (you need at least 2).
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#3
3quilibrium

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From my experience, when you do a speedtest over the wired network compared to being connected wirelessly, the WAN speed results tend to be slower when done through the wireless connection. So it makes sense that you see a slower WAN speed if connected via wireless. In terms of your WLAN connection, admin is correct that 802.11g has a theoretical maximum of 54Mbps, but when you consider interference and obstacles, it's actually much slower.

If you have money to dish out, I would consider upgrading the network to 802.11n, making sure both the client and router support this. Right now I get about 108mbps-130mbps if I connect to my 2.4Ghz network, but I get about 200mbps-300mbps when I connect on my 5Ghz network. I'm using the dual band Netgear DIR-825.
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#4
eyetripoli

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I was actually using a D-Link DIR-655 Wireless N router for a while bridged from my Actiontec. Unfortunately, a firmware update got pushed to the device by Verizon and killed my bridge and did not allow me to re-enable it. The two replacements I got from Verizon also do not allow bridging. I can't get around the Actiontec so I'm forced to use it. :(

Is there anything I can do besides bridging it?

~ieee
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