Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Black Screen


  • Please log in to reply

#1
XeonFlare

XeonFlare

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
Hi,

My laptop was closed one day, my kid had just closed the screen, and when I opened it, my computer would no longer boot. I have tried doing a hard reset, remove the battery, hold the power button for 30 seconds, and then try to boot the computer (this didn't work, I have tried to output the screen to an external monitor (it displays as no signal). Now, there are lights on the front panel, I have listened and the hard drive is also trying to work, but I've noticed that the fan is not working underneath. Also, I have tried removing the RAM and the hard-drive and tried booting up the computer (no success). I have heard that cleaning the RAM might help? Also, I have tried opening the screen at a 30 degree angle and booting; I heard there can be problems with a magnet and this method wasn't successful.

The model of computer is a Toshiba Satellite L500D. I have been considering disassembling the computer and trying to remove the CMOS battery, but, because the battery is soldered to the board, I have decided to delay with this option. I have tried to give as much information as possible, but please let me know if you need any additional information or if there is anything else I should try? Any help you could offer would be most appreciated; this computer is becoming a bit of an unhealthy obsession for me.

Thanks,

Xeon

Edited by XeonFlare, 27 November 2012 - 03:54 PM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 19,993 posts
Hello XeonFlare

Does the notebook shutdown on it`s own if you leave it.
Can you normally hear the cooling fan working.

Can you remove the Ram and power up the notebook and let us know if you get any error beeps or if there is any other change.

As you cannot hear the cooling fan working the notebook may have overheated, this may have damaged the MB, CPU, video chip or Ram with the worse case scenario being all of them, checking out the cooling fan asap is a must.

You have most likely read the disassembly guide but I have included it for the benefit of others who may read your topic http://www.irisvista...therboard-1.htm
  • 1

#3
XeonFlare

XeonFlare

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
I wouldn't say that you could normally hear the cooling fan working, but you could definitely see that it was working; this is no longer the case. I had removed the ram in the past, I have also just tried removing it, and I am not hearing any error beeps or anything like that. Likewise, when booting up the computer, I have tried pressing f2, f12 (the normal modifiers of the boot, this would normally make a noise, and doesn't in this case. It honestly doesn't seem like the computer is getting to the point of booting up. What are your thoughts about the CMOS battery? I had read something about "bios corruption" and it seemed to suggest de-soldering and re-soldering this battery could solve that problem; that is if you ignore the obvious risks of me taking a soldering iron to the computer.
  • 0

#4
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 19,993 posts
Re the cooling fan, I am not sure what you mean by "but you could definitely see that it was working;" notebook cooling fans can normally be heard working away quietly in the background most of the time and every once in a while the speed will increase and then decrease as the internal temps rise and the thermal sensor kicks the fan on and then off,, if you cannot hear the fan or if it is confirmed as 100% not running but the computer remains powered up the video chip or CPU may have overheated and failed but hopefully not.

No error beeps with the Ram removed may suggest that the issue is with hardware tested before the Ram as part of the POST (power on self test) this includes the power supply and the MB.

Try tapping the F1 or the Esc key when you next power up.

The fact that the external display shows the no signal message means that nothing is being sent to it from the notebook, when you tried this did you press the Fn and the F5 key to toggle from the notebook screen to the external screen.

I am not saying that it can`t happen but I have never worked on a computer that will not boot because of a bad CMOS battery, a dead BIOS chip yes but that will not be fixed by replacing the CMOS battery, it requires the BIOS chip to be replaced which is bad enough on a desktop computer but a nightmare on a notebook.

FWIW, overclocking or a bad BIOS flash are often the cause of a failed BIOS chip.
  • 0

#5
XeonFlare

XeonFlare

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts

Re the cooling fan, I am not sure what you mean by "but you could definitely see that it was working;" notebook cooling fans can normally be heard working away quietly in the background most of the time and every once in a while the speed will increase and then decrease as the internal temps rise and the thermal sensor kicks the fan on and then off,, if you cannot hear the fan or if it is confirmed as 100% not running but the computer remains powered up the video chip or CPU may have overheated and failed but hopefully not.

No error beeps with the Ram removed may suggest that the issue is with hardware tested before the Ram as part of the POST (power on self test) this includes the power supply and the MB.

Try tapping the F1 or the Esc key when you next power up.

The fact that the external display shows the no signal message means that nothing is being sent to it from the notebook, when you tried this did you press the Fn and the F5 key to toggle from the notebook screen to the external screen.

I am not saying that it can`t happen but I have never worked on a computer that will not boot because of a bad CMOS battery, a dead BIOS chip yes but that will not be fixed by replacing the CMOS battery, it requires the BIOS chip to be replaced which is bad enough on a desktop computer but a nightmare on a notebook.

FWIW, overclocking or a bad BIOS flash are often the cause of a failed BIOS chip.


I simply said that I could see it because I have memories of having seen it run, I have no such memory of hearing it; either way it is definitely not running or moving at this point. An interesting aside, I boot the computer up, watching the fan and it does turn on for a second and then almost immediately stops moving; not sure if that's useful but I just noticed it. Sorry, I had neglected to mention that I did try the fn+f5 while booting in the past and it made no difference.

As for overclocking and bios flashing, this computer has used mostly by my wife, I doubt she has ever tried either, so I'm inclined to say it's not the issue. All the same, thanks for the info. It is starting to look like we are heading into new laptop territory.
  • 0

#6
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 19,993 posts

Try tapping the F1 or the Esc key when you next power up.

Did you try this.

The tough part now is are you willing to risk replacing the cooling fan and hope that is resolves the issue.

Have you tried booting with only the battery in place and no AC adaptor and likewise no battery and only the AC adaptor connected.
Does your AC adaptor have a charging light on it and does it illuminate when powered up.
Is the AC adaptor port on the notebook secure as it is not uncommon for them to come free from the MB, this can cause problems with charging and system shorts.

NB: The OCing and BIOS flash information was just a FYI and no inference was intended, BIOS chip failure does happen but it is often caused by human intervention which in extreme cases includes malware attack.
  • 0

#7
XeonFlare

XeonFlare

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts

Try tapping the F1 or the Esc key when you next power up.

Did you try this.

The tough part now is are you willing to risk replacing the cooling fan and hope that is resolves the issue.

Have you tried booting with only the battery in place and no AC adaptor and likewise no battery and only the AC adaptor connected.
Does your AC adaptor have a charging light on it and does it illuminate when powered up.
Is the AC adaptor port on the notebook secure as it is not uncommon for them to come free from the MB, this can cause problems with charging and system shorts.

NB: The OCing and BIOS flash information was just a FYI and no inference was intended, BIOS chip failure does happen but it is often caused by human intervention which in extreme cases includes malware attack.


I hadn't tried tapping the F1 key / ESC key on startup, I just tried, and there's no luck there either. The AC adapter port seems to be secure, I assume that you are asking if it is loose within the machine, and that does not appear to be the case. The charging light does illuminate when you connect the adapter. I'll think about the cooling fan, looks like they are only about $40 dollars, but I get the uneasy feeling that it's not going to resolve the issue; perhaps that's just pessimism at this point. I wanted to thank you for all your help, it's be awesome to be able to pick someone's brain on this one.

Edited by XeonFlare, 29 November 2012 - 09:11 AM.

  • 0

#8
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 19,993 posts
Thanks for the update XeonFlare :thumbsup:

Have you tried booting with only the battery in place and no AC adaptor and likewise no battery and only the AC adaptor connected.

What is the answer please.

With all the testing that you have done, the results that they have returned, the fact that the notebook stays powered up ( based on your OP "there are lights on the front panel! ) but shows no display and the cooling fan not working I fear that you may need to have the video chip or the CPU replaced (worse case scenario both) due to one or both of them overheating, this I`m afraid will require the services of a tech who has access to the testing equipment and parts for testing, it is still worthwhile though checking out the cooling fan cleaning and functionality of the fan yourself though, I would not at present though spend any cash on a new cooling fan unless it is confirmed 100% as the cause of the issue.

You are welcome BTW :thumbsup:
  • 0

#9
XeonFlare

XeonFlare

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts

Have you tried booting with only the battery in place and no AC adaptor and likewise no battery and only the AC adaptor connected.




Sorry, I neglected to mention that I had already tried this, both ways, and it produces the same results.

Thanks for the update XeonFlare :thumbsup:

What is the answer please.

With all the testing that you have done, the results that they have returned, the fact that the notebook stays powered up ( based on your OP "there are lights on the front panel! ) but shows no display and the cooling fan not working I fear that you may need to have the video chip or the CPU replaced (worse case scenario both) due to one or both of them overheating, this I`m afraid will require the services of a tech who has access to the testing equipment and parts for testing, it is still worthwhile though checking out the cooling fan cleaning and functionality of the fan yourself though, I would not at present though spend any cash on a new cooling fan unless it is confirmed 100% as the cause of the issue.

You are welcome BTW :thumbsup:


Technician's hours plus the costs for parts, I'm thinking this laptop has seen the end of days and that's fine, I hate to waste a computer, but it just probably isn't worth it. I'll probably just backup the hard drive and perhaps re-visit the computer in the future as a learning opportunity. Out of curiosity, I understand if you don't have time to answer this question, do you know what equipment I'd need to the testing myself? I do some occasional computer repair work, nothing crazy, mostly format, backups, and what not, and I think it would be a great learning opportunity; like I said, I know I have taken up a lot of your time and would understand if you'd like to conclude here.

Have a good day and thanks,

Xeon

Edited by XeonFlare, 29 November 2012 - 01:09 PM.

  • 0

#10
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 19,993 posts
Rest assured I will try and assist you for as long as is necessary and FWIF I do not like to give up until I am completely out of ideas <_<

The testing equipment to which I referred is in the main spare parts, commercial techs will often have the type of replacement CPU that is needed for testing and if they don`t already have one they can normally obtain a video chip and solder into a MB for testing purposes at a minimal cost to themselves as the charge is incurred by the owner of the computer concerned, one tool that they do use that is readily available is a multi-meter but unfortunately without the computers electrical schematics and the knowledge of how to interpret the drawings the information may as well be in an alien language.

As I have said it is worthwhile checking out the cooling fan and if me I would reapply thermal paste to the CPU and GPU, you could also try removing the following all at once, wifi card, optical drive and HDD and see if there is any change.
  • 0

#11
XeonFlare

XeonFlare

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts

Rest assured I will try and assist you for as long as is necessary and FWIF I do not like to give up until I am completely out of ideas <_<

The testing equipment to which I referred is in the main spare parts, commercial techs will often have the type of replacement CPU that is needed for testing and if they don`t already have one they can normally obtain a video chip and solder into a MB for testing purposes at a minimal cost to themselves as the charge is incurred by the owner of the computer concerned, one tool that they do use that is readily available is a multi-meter but unfortunately without the computers electrical schematics and the knowledge of how to interpret the drawings the information may as well be in an alien language.

As I have said it is worthwhile checking out the cooling fan and if me I would reapply thermal paste to the CPU and GPU, you could also try removing the following all at once, wifi card, optical drive and HDD and see if there is any change.


Sounds good, I will try to make some time on the weekend and see if reapplying thermal paste and removing the wifi card, optical drive and HDD, though I have already removed this before, and see if there is any difference. I'll get back to you in a few days.
  • 0

#12
phillpower2

phillpower2

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 19,993 posts
OK, we will be here, good luck.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP