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route print command


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#1
agereus

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when using the route print command, is the network/subnet address 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 tied to the router Network Address Translation in use by my ISP? The 127.0.0.0 address range is already specified, so I'm assuming it cant be the loopback interface.
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#2
SleepyDude

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when using the route print command, is the network/subnet address 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 tied to the router Network Address Translation in use by my ISP?

I didn't understand your question very well but the 0.0.0.0 is used to set the default route if there is no specific rule for the destination address then the default route is used, normally you will see your router IP, on the router if you check the routes it will have as default router the IP of another router on the ISP network...

The 127.0.0.0 address range is already specified, so I'm assuming it cant be the loopback interface.


Yes.
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#3
agereus

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okay, thankyou for that response. The reason I asked is I've been reading about Network+ and the book didn't mention the 0.0.0.0 address in the route print command output. I was actually previously told that 0.0.0.0 was a machine address, and thus I shouldn't use it instead of 127.0.0.0 in the Windows HOSTS file in the /etc/drivers folder. I do have another question though, Is Tracert a reliable method of determining if my ISP is using RIP, RIPv2, or another dynamic routing protocol? I issued a tracert and originally it defaulted out at 30 hops to I specified -h for 200 and it's still going well passed 76. RIP and RIPv2 can only support I think 35-255 hops so I thought this might be one way of determining what protocols my data is being subjected to once it hits the web. Does that sound reliable?
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#4
SleepyDude

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okay, thankyou for that response. The reason I asked is I've been reading about Network+ and the book didn't mention the 0.0.0.0 address in the route print command output. I was actually previously told that 0.0.0.0 was a machine address, and thus I shouldn't use it instead of 127.0.0.0 in the Windows HOSTS file in the /etc/drivers folder. I do have another question though, Is Tracert a reliable method of determining if my ISP is using RIP, RIPv2, or another dynamic routing protocol? I issued a tracert and originally it defaulted out at 30 hops to I specified -h for 200 and it's still going well passed 76. RIP and RIPv2 can only support I think 35-255 hops so I thought this might be one way of determining what protocols my data is being subjected to once it hits the web. Does that sound reliable?


Sorry I'm not an expert on that subject. I know tracert isn't so reliable because it uses ICMP that is often blocked by ISP's.

On this page says cisco equipments have a limit of 15 hops I'm not surprise if this change from manufacture to manufacture.

RIP and RIPv2 are old protocols according to a colleague of mine that works with this presently other protocols are used.

Edited by SleepyDude, 24 May 2013 - 02:29 AM.

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#5
agereus

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thanks again
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