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Blue Screen without error message/code


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#1
biodante27

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Hi guys, first post here on this forum. I have a odd problem with a toshiba laptop. When I boot to windows the computers works fine (a little slow because is old) then after 15 mins the screen pop up a blue screen that i cant do anything. The screen havent message or a error code. I was thinking that can be a BSOD but after that I run the bluescreen viewer but doesnt showme any error. So after that I was thinking, maybe is the screen, so I go ahead I plug it with the vga port into a monitor, but same thing happened. I thinking maybe is the gpu that have some issue with it (like overheated or not much thermal paste, so I'm here before attempt anything asking what can be happening with the laptop? Any ideas? there a software to test the gpu (not furmar, or stress gpu). Any help will be appreciate.
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#2
phillpower2

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:welcome: biodante27

Can you run Speccy and post the url for us please.

Overheating could be a cause but it does not only affect the GPU it can also affect the Ram which can sometimes be solved by removing the battery, Ram, AC adapter, blowing out the memory slots, pressing the power on button for around 20 seconds to dispel any static charge that may have built up and then reassembling the notebook, a cleaning guide which is for HP notebooks but the principal is only the same, see Here
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#3
biodante27

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Thanks phil for the quick reply, i done that (to remove everything etc) but continue the issue with it. Now the os is really slow when I tried to run malwarebytes for looking a virus or something (get frozen). I run in safe mode to do the same (no virus etc) and never pop up the bluescreen, so I think is something in software related. However, for the reason is a old pc, the laptop itself is very hot, when I ran the program for the info, the temp was on 80C but after 5 mins came down to 61C, I dont know, but maybe have 2 issues in one. If nothings works, i will attemting to install windows 7 lite to see if works better.

Attached Files


Edited by biodante27, 01 September 2013 - 11:09 AM.

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#4
phillpower2

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Thanks for the update biodante27 :thumbsup:

Please ensure that crashdumps are enabled on the notebook, see option one Here

The CPU reaching 80°C when only running Speccy is not a good sign, can your at any time hear the internal cooling fan working and if so does it sound as it always has because at 10+ years old it could be showing signs of wear and tear and/or be clogged with dust, the maximum safe temp for your CPU is 100°C but you would not want things to get this hot too often as it stresses the hardware.

Are you aware that Windows 7 has not been updated since 8/25/2012, this is putting you at risk of malware attack each and every time you access the internet, with this in mind I suggest that once the notebook has been cleaned out as per the link and information that I provided earlier I suggest that you get Windows and all other important software such as your AV (MSE) fully up to date, if the computer still has problems I would ask that you refer to the tutorial provided courtesy of admin which can be found Here

See if the cleaning etc helps and then post back please.

You are welcome BTW :thumbsup:
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#5
biodante27

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The reason that windows has that update from that date was because the calendar was in 2012. I updated everything (downloaded sp1 etc) and well I dont why it change the date. However, I clean everything (very good amount of dust inside of it) and I noticed that the cpu had only a little bit, for my experience not too much thermal paste. For that reason, i cleaned everything and applied new thermal paste (artic silver 5) and then I tested out. So that really helped the pc because the fan was not too noise and the laptop dont start to get hot really easy (like before). But the problem persist (white screen or blue after 15 mins aprox.), so i think the cpu or gpu is damage, for the longtime without thermal paste, etc. Thanks for your help phil :)+rep
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#6
phillpower2

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The next time that you have finished using the Toshiba for the evening shutdown the notebook and remove the AC adapter and the battery, press the power on button for 20 - 30 seconds, the next day reassemble the battery etc, restart the computer and check if the correct time and date are being displayed.

The reason that windows has that update from that date was because the calendar was in 2012. I updated everything (downloaded sp1 etc) and well I dont why it change the date.

The computer is old so it is possible that the CMOS battery has died and needs replacing, what a CMOS battery does

Thermal paste does not normally need replacing unless the heatsink has been removed for some reason, clogged cooling fan/s and vents will however over time cause damage and weaken all of the computers hardware.

Have you ensured that crashdumps are enabled on the computer.
Have you done the cleaning that was suggested.
Have you followed the admin tutorial.

You are welcome BTW biodante27 :thumbsup:
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#7
biodante27

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Well if the cmos battery is dead the computer will never start in first place (because for it the computer boot up into the bios), so I thought that can be the hdd but I tried to install windows again and same problem, blue screen, so I dont know, for me is the gpu or cpu. And no, i cant enable that because the computer "frozen" or get the blue screen without message ( I run bluescreen viewer but no message or anything, so is not the common blue screen) after 5mins to 15 mins. Actually, after I did everything with the program you told me, the screen pop out right away after I saved it. So is really odd problem. I will try again and thanks a bunch :D

Edited by biodante27, 03 September 2013 - 01:53 PM.

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#8
phillpower2

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Well if the cmos battery is dead the computer will never start in first place

Not sure where you heard this but the information is incorrect, the computer will boot up but the time and date will be set back to the point from when the BIOS was originally activated on the MB, this poses a serious security threat if not remedied as the computer will not be able to download and install the security updates for the operating system and anti virus software.

because for it the computer boot up into the bios

The computer does not boot into the BIOS it gets the boot device sequence from it, once the computer has completed the power on self test (POST) it then accesses the storage device where the OS is stored and boots into Windows or whatever OS is being used.

What happens between the time that you power up the computer and when the icons appear on the desktop;

In order for a computer to successfully boot, the BIOS, operating system and hardware components must all be working properly; failure of any one of these three elements will likely result in a failed boot sequence.

When the computer's power is first turned on, the CPU initializes itself, which is triggered by a series of clock ticks generated by the system clock. Part of the CPU's initialization is to look to the system's ROM BIOS for its first instruction in the startup program. The ROM BIOS stores the first instruction, which is the instruction to run the power-on self test (POST), in a predetermined memory address. POST begins by checking the BIOS chip and then tests CMOS RAM. If the POST does not detect a battery failure, it then continues to initialize the CPU, checking the inventoried hardware devices (such as the video card), secondary storage devices, such as hard drives and floppy drives, ports and other hardware devices, such as the keyboard and mouse, to ensure they are functioning properly.

Once the POST has determined that all components are functioning properly and the CPU has successfully initialized, the BIOS looks for an OS to load.

The BIOS typically looks to the CMOS chip to tell it where to find the OS, and in most PCs, the OS loads from the C drive on the hard drive even though the BIOS has the capability to load the OS from a floppy disk, CD or ZIP drive. The order of drives that the CMOS looks to in order to locate the OS is called the boot sequence, which can be changed by altering the CMOS setup. Looking to the appropriate boot drive, the BIOS will first encounter the boot record, which tells it where to find the beginning of the OS and the subsequent program file that will initialize the OS.

Once the OS initializes, the BIOS copies its files into memory and the OS basically takes over control of the boot process. Now in control, the OS performs another inventory of the system's memory and memory availability (which the BIOS already checked) and loads the device drivers that it needs to control the peripheral devices, such as a printer, scanner, optical drive, mouse and keyboard. This is the final stage in the boot process, after which the user can access the system’s applications to perform tasks.
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