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Question about WPA/WPA2-802.1x


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#1
KiwiProbie

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Hi guys,

Just wondering, my current connection i have changed my router to is 802.11n (supposed to be faster, and i have noticed a huge improvement on internet and network connections since I have done this.)

My question is I am currently using WPA/WPA2-PSK, if I was to change it to WPA/WPA2-802.1x, do I really have to connect to a RAPID or what ever its called, server?
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#2
VzAcnY

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Hi guys,

Just wondering, my current connection i have changed my router to is 802.11n (supposed to be faster, and i have noticed a huge improvement on internet and network connections since I have done this.)

My question is I am currently using WPA/WPA2-PSK, if I was to change it to WPA/WPA2-802.1x, do I really have to connect to a RAPID or what ever its called, server?

U r using EAP Based and use of server certificates is optional in EAP.
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#3
KiwiProbie

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No im currently using WPA/WPA2-PSK
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#4
VzAcnY

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No im currently using WPA/WPA2-PSK

Yeah That's the encryption name.
EAP is key management in it.
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#5
KiwiProbie

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Anyway, do you have an answer for my original question?
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#6
AdvHomeServer

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Anyway, do you have an answer for my original question?


Yes, I have one.

802.1X refers to RADIUS servers. They are special configurations that are more difficult to set up and not suitable for most home networks.

A WPA2/AES or WPA2/PSK (same thing, different name)uses a preshared key, otherwise known as a password, to authenticate and authorize access to the home network. Just about all home networks use this approach. Anyone who has the password can access the network.

802.1X refers to a RADIUS server. A RADIUS server takes a different approach and requires an entirely different hardware configuration. 1st, users are authorized by user id and password, not just a universal shared password. The user id corresponds to a user profile on a file server. In between the user and the server is a RADIUS server. Sometimes the RADIUS server and the file server are the same hardware. The RADIUS server acts as the gatekeeper and decides who gets on the network and who doesn't by acting as a go-between.

Most PCs don't have the capability to set up a RADIUS server and, unless you have special needs, it would be a waste of time and effort to try to set one up. Now, if you have hobby interests, that's different. But most users would just be pushing a rock uphill to set one up.

802.11n communicates at 300Mbps, more or less (usually less) but is substantially faster than the 802.11g you probably upgraded from. The WPA2... refers to encryption and has nothing to do with speed. Oddly, 802.1x also refers to encryption. 802.11 has nothing to do with encryption and can use several types of it. WPA2/AES is recommended with a long and tricky password.

My blog, Advanced Home Server, is intended for the person who sets us a home network and wonders what to do next. It documents a RADIUS server on a QNAP drive. It's not what you have but the concepts might make it more clear.
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#7
VzAcnY

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Anyway, do you have an answer for my original question?


Read carefully first and then reply.
You didn't even read my first reply properly.
Check My first reply.
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#8
KiwiProbie

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Hi AdvHomeServer,

802.1X refers to RADIUS servers. They are special configurations that are more difficult to set up and not suitable for most home networks.


Awesome thank you hehe, this is more of what I was wanting to know a bit more in depth and this does it.

A WPA2/AES or WPA2/PSK (same thing, different name)uses a preshared key, otherwise known as a password, to authenticate and authorize access to the home network. Just about all home networks use this approach. Anyone who has the password can access the network.


Yeah this is totally what I'm using and as I have just activated last night - MAC address filtering..... It's bloody handy as.

802.1X refers to a RADIUS server. A RADIUS server takes a different approach and requires an entirely different hardware configuration. 1st, users are authorized by user id and password, not just a universal shared password. The user id corresponds to a user profile on a file server. In between the user and the server is a RADIUS server. Sometimes the RADIUS server and the file server are the same hardware. The RADIUS server acts as the gatekeeper and decides who gets on the network and who doesn't by acting as a go-between.


So this is more for if you have an Home Server as well? I dont have one, yet but have been thinking about it to store all the media. Also does Home Entertainment Center with Media Hubs, they don't have this feature too aye?

Most PCs don't have the capability to set up a RADIUS server and, unless you have special needs, it would be a waste of time and effort to try to set one up. Now, if you have hobby interests, that's different. But most users would just be pushing a rock uphill to set one up.


Sounds like a heck of a mission to get it set up, but persoanlly I dont need it, is there other great tools that you can use for securing the wireless network? At the end of the year Im getting my home entertainment system that comes with a media hub, and I dont want just anyone getting access to it just who ever is on my network.

802.11n communicates at 300Mbps, more or less (usually less) but is substantially faster than the 802.11g you probably upgraded from. The WPA2... refers to encryption and has nothing to do with speed. Oddly, 802.1x also refers to encryption. 802.11 has nothing to do with encryption and can use several types of it. WPA2/AES is recommended with a long and tricky password.


I knew that the encryption part doesn't have anything to do with the speed, its more to do with securing access to my network, no password no access..... network gets hacked, MAC address gets added to the deny list and password gets changed again..... which I change it every few weeks anyway. :D

Also my next question for you is about the NAT that is my in my router settings, what is the deals with that, I dont really know much about NAT, I'm what you might say a bit of a novice with it comes to WiFi things....... first network that I have run with full wireless access, all the others have been wired.... needed the upgrade cause I got sick of wires here there and every where, and don't want the kids playing with the wires hence why the upgrade.
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#9
AdvHomeServer

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You asked about NAT.

My site Advanced Home Server has several articles that deal with networking. NAT is built into your router. It takes the IP address from your service provider and 'multiplexes' it among all devices attached to your home network. the articls DDNS and a little more covers NAT in depth.
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#10
KiwiProbie

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Awesome thank you muchly :D
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