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black monitor after overklocking


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#1
newghost

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Hi I have try to upgrade my cpu so refering to Mb's doc I put a ddr 400 and

change my 2.4ghz 533 mhzs cpu to 3.0ghz 800 mhtz.

for info I've as Mb msi 845 pe with intel p4 2.4 533 mhz ddr400


after doing that I've got a black monitor.


so if some1 can help me


best regards
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#2
audioboy

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wow, you cranked those settings WAY too high!
to get back to a usable system, you need to clear the CMOS. you will find a good description on how to do that in your motherboard documentation. if not, please specify exactly which model of mobo you have (on the MSI site there are many variations, max, max-l, neo-l, etc but only one MS-xxxx number per board) and we can talk you through it.

did you get a new processor, or just try to crank up the current one?
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#3
newghost

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thank you audioboy. my MB is a Ms-6580 (v5.X)

I've try to clear the CMOS by shorting 2-3 pin as discrabed on my Mb's

guide and I still have the same probl

I've both of them (2.4 533ghz and 3.0 800ghz)
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#4
audioboy

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OK, time to go hardcore on clearing the cmos. unplug the PC, then unplug the multi pin connector that goes onto the mobo. remove the 4 pin 12V plug too, so the board is not connected to the psu at all. remove the cmos battery from the mobo, move the jumper to clear cmos, and let it sit for 10 minutes. then reinstall battery, put the jumper back to normal reconnect both power plugs to mobo.

if that doesnt clear it, nothing will, and it shows us the board is hosed.
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#5
newghost

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thank you I'll do this and I keep you informed
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#6
newghost

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I've done what you tell me but it still not working
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#7
audioboy

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alright, a few questions then. did you put thermal paste on when you installed the new processor (between the chip and heatsink/fan)?
you havent been able to boot at all since switching out the cpu and ram, correct?
I checked with a friend on this, here is what he had to say-

he could have trashed the board but this also brings up other questions - any thermal paste when he switched processors? How long did he try to run it or leave it powered on with his "new" settings. I'd suggest he put original cpu back and see if he can boot after clearing CMOS again and heading into BIOS immediately - reset to default. If no go - board is probably toast


also, for clearing cmos, no need to pull the battery, and moving the jumper to clear for 20-30 seconds is enough. I went a little overboard earlier, better to be safe than sorry...

so answer the questions above, mine and the other guys, try swapping back the cpu and ram, clear cmos again, and see if you can boot.
remember to add thermal paste before installing the hsf, so as not to fry the cpu.

Edited by audioboy, 15 June 2005 - 07:48 PM.

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#8
newghost

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first thank you for your interst

yes I put it

that's correct

I'll do it
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#9
audioboy

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is this your motherboard?
if so, it looks like it can only support an 800MHz FSB with overclocking. that makes me a bit nervous about it.
the other board listed only had a max 533 fsb.
still though, the ram should run at the slower speed fine.

let me know how it goes with the CPU swap. if its still failing, a new mobo with full support for your new cpu and ram can be pretty cheap.
I picked up an MSI board at fry's a couple months ago for $60, socket 478, all the usual features. PT880-neo2.
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#10
newghost

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that's it.

yes it is. shall I take an asus p4p800s-x for 75$ ?

best regards
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#11
audioboy

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did the cpu swap fail?

that asus board would be fine, they make good quality mobos.

if your going to be getting a new mobo, one thing to consider would be to get a new SATA drive. load windows onto that, it will speed up the whole system. sata is the new standard for hard drives, its faster, uses smaller cabling (for improved airflow), and doesnt cost anymore than IDE drives.
you could then install your old hard drive, transfer all your data over, and use the old drive as extra storage.

if your interested in that, I can give you a few tips for setting that up, to make life easier.
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#12
newghost

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yes it is. so I must change the mobo.

I know that and asus p4p800s-x supports two sata drives.

Yes I enjoy your help
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#13
audioboy

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OK, that asus board will be fine.
you have a copy of windows to load onto a new drive, correct?
oh, for a SATA drive, you will need a floppy drive to load drivers. Im hoping you have one in your pc currently. if not, borrow one from a friend, or you can buy one pretty cheap these days.

once you parts arrive, refer to the "system building info" at the top of this forum for some basic setup procedures.

leave your old hard drive out of the system for now, to make sure nothing gets done to it accidentally. you will need to set the BIOS to allow it to boot to the SATA drive. it should be laid out in the manual for the mobo.
when you go to load windows, you will see a prompt saying "press F6 to load third party SCSI/RAID drivers." press F6 then, and install the driver disk (floppy) that came with the mobo. you will be presented with a choice of drivers, the correct one should be mentioned in the manual.
after that, windows will continue loading and finish up. the very next step is to install the mobo drivers, which should have come on a CD with the board (or download the latest ones from their website).
then you are free to do whatever you want to the system, as everything should be fully functional at that point. grab the windows service packs and updates, etc.

any questions, hit a snag, whatever, we can help you out. post back here or to a new thread, we can sort you out!
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#14
newghost

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thank you for all.


you're the best


and I'm so glad about your accepting to share with me your knowledge.
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#15
audioboy

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your welcome, happy to help out!
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