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Unparking cpu cores....?


Best Answer dsenette , 20 August 2015 - 08:16 AM

manually unparking cpu cores, as a general rule, will not give you any appreciable benefit. anyone that claims it does, is either experiencing a VERY specific case (i.e. one SPECIFIC software packa... Go to the full post »


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#1
Porkins76

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Dear Community,

 

Wasn't sure if this was the right location to put this but found it mentioned in another thread here so figure I try here.

 

So after doing some research I did unpark the cores on my cpu. Didn't notice a real difference yet. Just curious on anyone's opinion who have also done this. Wondering what their results were. Is it at all dangerous. I made a restore point before doing so so I can revert the settings back.

 

Just curious about the topic.

 

Thanks to any and all responses. Always appreciated.

 

8)

 

 


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#2
dsenette

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✓  Best Answer

manually unparking cpu cores, as a general rule, will not give you any appreciable benefit. anyone that claims it does, is either experiencing a VERY specific case (i.e. one SPECIFIC software package gains some advantage) or mistaken.

 

IF you're using a multithreaded/multicore optimized app, it will park/unpark the cores as it needs them. if you're using an app that isn't multithreaded/multicore optimized, then you can unpark all the cores you want, it's still not going to use them.


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#3
Porkins76

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manually unparking cpu cores, as a general rule, will not give you any appreciable benefit. anyone that claims it does, is either experiencing a VERY specific case (i.e. one SPECIFIC software package gains some advantage) or mistaken.

 

IF you're using a multithreaded/multicore optimized app, it will park/unpark the cores as it needs them. if you're using an app that isn't multithreaded/multicore optimized, then you can unpark all the cores you want, it's still not going to use them.

 

Thank you so much for the response. I actually did try a game or two while they were unparked and I couldn't say I really noticed anything. I was kind of feeling nervous about the whole thing though so I basically did a system restore anyhow to set them back the way they were.

 

From what I have been experiencing and the googling and research I have been doing I tend to agree with you. It does seem to be whether or not the application is optimized properly. The games I used in comparison were TERA, Guild Worlds 2 and Elder scrolls online. Out of all 3 of those games right now I'm seeing probably the best FPS with Elder scrolls. And I the settings on all the games at mid range or lower.

 

Again thanks so much for your input!


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