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PC not booting (Solved)


Best Answer iammykyl , 08 December 2015 - 06:52 PM

Gday.  The computer does not start at all so would not be able to do that  In that case, you must answer the questions you have been asked, otherwise we are only guessing what t... Go to the full post »


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#1
ImSadandLonely

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Recently built a PC (Specs down below) and upon attempting to boot it up the fans give a tiny spin and the LED briefly lights up before it goes dark and nothing happens. Any tips on what could be causing this would be great thanks.
GPU: Asus nVidia GeForce GTX750ti Strix 2gb
MB: Asrock 970 Pro3 R2.0
PSU: Corsair CX430M 430w
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws-x DDR3 (times 2)
CPU: AMD FX 4300
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#2
Lokhe

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First thing to make sure is that you have properly connected power to the Motherboard and CPU and that all the RAM is secure and in the right slot I guess :)


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#3
rshaffer61

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I would also check to make sure you have not put a standoff someplace where there is no hole to put a screw in the motherboard. Sounds like a short to me. Did you by chance bench test the components before installing them in the case? Also you don't post a PSU so it might help to know the make and model of that.
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#4
Lokhe

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Also you don't post a PSU so it might help to know the make and model of that.

 

He did :) PSU: Corsair CX430M 430w


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#5
rshaffer61

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Seems to be under powered for the system. I do agree though that the voltage settings for the ram is not correct and needs to be addressed.
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#6
ImSadandLonely

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How do I change the settings for the RAM? Or is it my best option to look at a new PSU?
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#7
rshaffer61

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I suggest starting with the ram settings. Did you set the voltages yourself or has the bios had changes done to it by someone else?
To change the settings you will need to go into the bios to the memory or power settings and then highlight the ram voltage to change it to the correct settings.
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#8
ImSadandLonely

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The computer does not start at all so would not be able to do that
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#9
iammykyl

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✓  Best Answer

Gday.

 

 

The computer does not start at all so would not be able to do that

 

 In that case, you must answer the questions you have been asked, otherwise we are only guessing what the problem might be.

 

"have properly connected power to the Motherboard and CPU and that all the RAM is secure and in the right slot"   That refers too,

The 24 pin ATX Power Connector (ATXPWR1) see user manual item #8 page #15

and the ATX 12V Power Connector (ATX12V1) item #1 page #15.

The CPU heatsink fan is plugged into the correct header on the motherboard, CPU Fan Connector (CPU_FAN1) not fan-2, item #5 page #15.

 

For your RAM,

If you adopt DDR3 2100/1866/1800/1600 memory modules on this motherboard, it is recommended to install them on DDR3_A2 and DDR3_B2 slots

2 x 240-pin DDR3 DIMM Slots (Dual Channel: DDR3_A2, DDR3_B2) item #7 page #15.

Make sure the locking tabs at each end of the sticks are fully engaged. 

 

********

 

"check to make sure you have not put a standoff someplace where there is no hole to put a screw in the motherboard."

There should be only 6 standoffs under the MB, 3 down the left side (where all the ports are) and 3 down the right side. 

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#10
rshaffer61

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Good response Iammykyl as that is what I was looking for before you posted it. I think it is either a connection is wrong or the stand offs are not right.
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#11
ImSadandLonely

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I have checked that all of the connectors you mentioned are securely and tightly within their respective sockets. The case I have has raised screw holes, is it still necessary to use the standoffs on top of these? Just for reference the case is an aerocool PGS VX-e pro

Edited by ImSadandLonely, 08 December 2015 - 11:22 PM.

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#12
Lokhe

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I have checked that all of the connectors you mentioned are securely and tightly within their respective sockets. The case I have has raised screw holes, is it still necessary to use the standoffs on top of these? Just for reference the case is an aerocool PGS VX-e pro

 

If I'm not terribly mistaken, the motherboard stand-offs come with the case and not the motherboard? If stand-offs were included with the case then I'd think they're absolutely meant to be used. It was a little bit hard to see on the pictures of your case but it might be that they're only intended to be used with smaller motherboards and that the raised holes are for standard ATX boards.

 

I guess the I/O plate will answer your question though. If the I/O ports on the motherboard doesn't fit in the I/O plate that would mean it's not appropriately leveled. Since you've already installed everything then it sounds like it did fit?


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#13
ImSadandLonely

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yes it does fit with the I/O plate. I talked to one of my friends and he told me he had a similar problem and that his was caused by his PSU. He also said not to take his word for it and to test it before doing anything. Could it be a faulty PSU and how would I test for that?


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#14
Lokhe

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yes it does fit with the I/O plate. I talked to one of my friends and he told me he had a similar problem and that his was caused by his PSU. He also said not to take his word for it and to test it before doing anything. Could it be a faulty PSU and how would I test for that?

 

The only sure fire way of testing that, of which I can think, is using multiple PCs. Is your system not working, try the component in another working system to determine. I'm guessing you might not have that option.

 

I'm not very good with PSU wattage and how much is needed where. You could try removing your graphics card which should be one of the bigger power hogs and try without it. 430W should at least be enough for that. If that works then you're closer to solving your problem.


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#15
iammykyl

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yes it does fit with the I/O plate.

So, providing the 6 pre installed standoff match the screw holes in the MB, and there are no extra ones under it, a short at that place seems unlikely.   

Unless it is faulty, the PSU should run the system as the GPU only draws a max of 75W from the PCI-E slot.

It is best to do a bare bones setup to test the parts, this would include whether the PSU is at least functioning.

 

Disconnect the PSU from the wall socket.

Remove all cables to the MB, including ones from the case switches.

Remove the GPU,

Remove the RAM.

unscrew and remove the MB and sit it on top of the MB box, this should be placed close to the case.

Attach the 24 pin and 12v cables from the PSU, Make sure the Heatsink fan is still plugged in.   Reconnect PSU to the wall socket and switch it on.

With tip of a very small screwdriver, briefly short out the two power-on pins located on the system panel header, see user manual, bottom of page #30.

The PSU fan should spin up.   The CPU fan should start and briefly run at full speed, then slow down to wisper quiet, both should keep gooing.

Switch of the PSU.

Please report results. 


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