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Wanted: USB Wi-Fi Adapter for High Speed Internet


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#1
spikedholly

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Does anyone know of any inexpensive USB Wi-Fi Adapters that can run 60mpbs+ high speed internet and speedtest at that speed?
 
My current adapter (Belkin SWifi USB Adapter (F9l1005-tg) is only testing out at 20mbps and of course my gaming lags because of the stupid adapter.
 
If I could hardwire, I totally would... :( )
 
Thanks in advance.
 

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#2
starjax

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Totally feel your pain.  Can you tell us about your wireless router?  That will help us make any recommendations. 


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#3
spikedholly

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Linksys - AC1200 Dual-Band Wi-Fi Router 

 

Wireless-AC technology

Provides optimal signal strength and coverage.

Dual-band 2.4GHz/5.0GHz frequency

Along with 1.3GHz dual-core processor allows you to achieve transfers as fast as 3.2 Gbps.

Compatible with 802.11ac

Backward compatible with 802.11n networks, so you can upgrade easily.

2 high-performance antennas

For enhanced performance.

4 Gigabit LAN ports

Along with 1 Gigabit WAN port, 1 USB 3.0 port and 1 eSATA/USB 2.0 port for flexible connectivity.

WPA2 encryption and SPI firewall

Help keep your network secure.

Plug-and-play operation

For fast, easy setup.


Edited by spikedholly, 13 September 2016 - 12:22 PM.

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#4
starjax

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I went with the tplink listed here:  http://www.newegg.co...N82E16833704045

 

its rated up to 150mbs. You will probably only get near that if you are able to use 5ghz.  it will be less than that with N, but your router will have supeior N performance over older routers.  I say that because 5ghz has range liimits.  You will just need to experiment with what works best in your environment.

 

also the edimax gets a lot of good reviews:

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16833315091


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#5
terry1966

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starjax, i'm curious why you only recommend n adaptors when the the router is ac capable?

 

i think i'd need to know what usb ports are on the pc and also what isp speed connection the op pays for/has.

 

can't find much info on the wifi adaptor they have already but if it's this one :- https://www.amazon.c...r/dp/B00SHTO9JE

 

then it's already faster at 300Mbps than the 2 recommended at 150Mbs.(and by the way neither adaptor can use the routers 5ghz frequency.)

 

not that it really makes any difference because if they have a 20Mb internet connection then all the adaptors mentioned are more than capable transferring data at their max speed if they are in a good signal range. and any gaming lag problems they have probably has nothing at all to do with the wifi connection unless it's interference or week signal.

 

even an old g wifi adaptor would be capable of transferring data at the 20Mbs if that's their internet connection speed.

 

personally i'd only recommend usb 3 ac adaptors if they have usb3 ports, or a pci-e ac adaptor seeing how they have an ac router.

 

some links and info that might be of interest.

 

Below is a breakdown of actual real-life average speeds you can expect from wireless routers within a reasonable distance, with low interference and small number of simultaneous clients:
802.11b - 2-3 Mbps downstream, up to 5-6 Mbps with some vendor-specific extensions.
802.11g - ~20 Mbps downstream
802.11n - 40-50 Mbps typical, varying greatly depending on configuration, whether it is mixed or N-only network, the number of bonded channels, etc. Specifying a channel, and using 40MHz channels can help achieve 70-80Mbps with some newer routers. Up to 100 Mbps achievable with more expensive commercial equipment with 8x8 arrays, gigabit ports, etc.
802.11ac - 70-100+ Mbps typical, higher speeds (200+ Mbps) possible over short distances without many obstacles, with newer generation 802.11ac routers, and client adapters capable of multiple streams.

http://www.speedguid...of-wireless-374

 

http://homenetworkad...-ac-difference/

 

http://www.techworld...l-2016-3633986/

 

http://www.wirelessh...connection.html

 

:popcorn:

 

 

If I could hardwire, I totally would... )

have you considered power lines? :- http://www.newegg.co...N=-1&isNodeId=1


Edited by terry1966, 14 September 2016 - 02:50 AM.

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#6
spikedholly

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ooo No! I've been out of the networking game so much I didn't know that existed :P Thanks!


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#7
starjax

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Good info Terry and thanks for pointing out the wrong links. 

 

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16833704254is the adapter I currently own and is an improvement over the old "n" adapter I had. 

 

If you want a deeper dive into the technology feel free to check out http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/


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#8
terry1966

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what really bugs me is adaptors like your ac one is advertised at up to 600Mbps speeds then use a usb2 connection where the theoretical speed of the connection itself maxes out at 480Mbps (real world much less.) in the first place, so how can it ever reach it's claimed 600Mbps.

 

looks like a nice adaptor though and one i'd think worth trying, always liked adaptors with a decent high gain aerial fitted to them.

 

:popcorn:


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#9
starjax

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Don't confuse real world performance vs theoretical.  Unless your transmitting a large amount of data, like backing up your pc, you probably won't come close to maxing the throughput of usb 2.0.  sure 3.0 is better, especially when it comes to external storage. 

 

http://appleinsider....throughput.html

 

or if you want a deeper dive:  http://www.smallnetb...adapter-roundup

 

What kind of games do you play? 


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#10
terry1966

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Don't confuse real world performance vs theoretical.

i never do.  ;)  (and was the point of my little gripe about advertised speeds. :rofl:)

 

 

What kind of games do you play?

i don't play any games that require internet, and i never use wifi at the moment (except mobile phone) but when i did, it was used with my mythtv pvr setup for pc to pc media streaming and file transfers, along with backups (we're talking TB's of data.), so often saturated the usb2 connection, my pc's only have usb2, and i often wished i had usb3 connections where i would be more likely to be limited by other factors, like drive write speed, than connection throughput capabilities. :D

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 16 September 2016 - 03:33 AM.

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