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Static IP address setting up problems


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#1
ClosetStarTrekker

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Hi There

I am trying to set up a static IP address for port forwarding. I have followed the instructions on www.portforward.com. I have used the IP address that I obtained from my router to set up a static IP address but when I save the settings I get this message:

"The default gateway is not on the same network segment (subnet) that is defined by the IP address and subnet mask"

 

I hope someone is able to help.

 

Thanks in advance.

Paul


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#2
SleepyDude

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Hi,

 

I need to know more about your network configuration. With the computer normally connected do this please.

 

Download MiniToolBox and save the file to the Desktop.
Run the tool and check the following options:

  • List IP configuration

Click on Go.

Post the resulting log in your next reply.

 

 

Can you post a screenshot showing the network configuration window when you try to set the fixed IP address?


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#3
ClosetStarTrekker

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Hey there SleepyDude,
Can I ask, posting that info in open forum can that open me up to someone abusing that information. If so can I PM the info to you?

Thanks
ClosetStarTrekker
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#4
SleepyDude

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Hi,

 

Unless you have a public address the report don't contain any private information.

 

Usually the internal IP's everyone use start with 192. or 10.


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#5
ClosetStarTrekker

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Hi SleepyDude
Attached is the output from Minitoolbox and screen shot.

 

Hope this helps

 

ClosetStarTrekker

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • screenshot.jpg

Attached Files

  • Attached File  MTB.txt   9.34KB   28 downloads

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#6
SleepyDude

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Hi,

Thanks for the log.

What was the fixed IP address you tried to use? you didn't put the values tried on the TCP/IP configuration screenshot...

 

Can you access the router interface http://10.1.1.1locate the DHCP server settings and find the range of IP's used?


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#7
ClosetStarTrekker

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Hi SleepyDude,

 

DHCP range is 10.1.1.2 to 10.1.1.254

 

Screen shots of settings and error message attached

 

ClosetStarTrekker

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1.png
  • 2.png

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#8
terry1966

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i'd use these settings.

 

set static ip to 10.1.1.10

set subnet mask to 255.255.255.0

set default gateway to 10.1.1.1

 

set dns server to obtain dns server address automatically.

 

then go into your router settings and port forward whatever port you need open to 10.1.1.10

 

:popcorn:


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#9
SleepyDude

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Hi,

 

First to avoid IP conflicts you need to change the DHCP range to free some space 10.1.1.2 to 10.1.1.200

 

Then use a fixed IP address outside the DHCP range

IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 10.1.1.201

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 10.1.1.1

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.1.1.1


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#10
ClosetStarTrekker

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Hi SleepyDude,
I have entered those numbers and all seems to be working well.

Thank you very much for that.
Terry1966 thanks for you input also.

ClosetStarTrekker
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#11
SleepyDude

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:thumbsup:


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#12
terry1966

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glad to hear it now works. :spoton:

 

quick question for sleepydude, not having ever had an ip conflict myself (most devices connected though at one time has only ever been 7 or 8) when setting static ip's without changing dhcp range so the static ip is outside dhcp range/control and not being a networking expert i was wondering is that the standard way experts are taught as best practice for setting up static ip's? or is that just the way you set up static ip's to rule out the chance of a conflict? also how likely is it to get an ip conflict by not putting it outside dhcp range?

 

:popcorn:


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#13
SleepyDude

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Hi Terry,

 

When the client is using DCHP and depending of the server both try to avoid IP conflicts, when you set fixed IP address conflicts can be created easily for example if the device with static IP is off and the DHCP server receives a request for IP it can assign to the client the same IP you set as static, if you power-on the machine it creates an IP conflict.

 

Depending on the DHCP server/configuration some allow IP reservation, for a specific MAC address an IP is reserved, this option is simpler because you don't have to configure the IP as static on the machine, the DHCP server will assign always the same IP, if the computer is connected to a different network no changes on the network configuration is needed.


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#14
terry1966

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if the device with static IP is off and the DHCP server receives a request for IP it can assign to the client the same IP you set as static, if you power-on the machine it creates an IP conflict.

that's where i'm getting confused, surely as soon as the static ip pc is turned on and requests it's ip the dhcp server recognises it's already issued that ip and kicks the other pc off the network requiring it to ask for a new ip or sends an ip update notice/request to the conflicting pc to issue it with a new ip so the static ip device can use it's static ip and and the other device seamlessly gets a new ip automatically therefore avoiding any problems with conflicts.

 

like i said even though i've set static ip's for years i've never had a conflict ever as far as i remember, so thought the only way to get one was to issue the same static ip to 2 pc's or if there was a serious problem with the dhcp server where it was not doing it's job correctly, and why i was wondering, because it's the first time i've heard anyone recommend setting a static ip outside the dhcp range, if setting static ip's outside the dhcp range was the new way of setting things up or if that's always been best practise and i've been doing it wrong and should remember to change the way i do things and also recommend to people even though at the moment i really don't see the need to set a static ip outside dhcp range if it's doing it's job correctly, as it should be doing.

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 01 August 2017 - 05:59 AM.

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#15
SleepyDude

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if the device with static IP is off and the DHCP server receives a request for IP it can assign to the client the same IP you set as static, if you power-on the machine it creates an IP conflict.

that's where i'm getting confused, surely as soon as the static ip pc is turned on and requests it's ip the dhcp server recognises it's already issued that ip and kicks the other pc off the network requiring it to ask for a new ip or sends an ip update notice/request to the conflicting pc to issue it with a new ip so the static ip device can use it's static ip and and the other device seamlessly gets a new ip automatically therefore avoiding any problems with conflicts.

 

The machine with a static IP will not contact the DHCP server. When a dhcp client asks for an IP the dhcp server tries to check if the next free IP on the pool is not in use if it fails to detect that the IP is already in use (by the static PC) it will not assign another IP to the client and the conflict will happen.

 

Depending on the number of clients, the time an IP is leased and the IP range available the problem could be more noticeable or not.

On a network with more clients than the total number of available of IP's this is something important to consider and eventually decide to use a bigger network class.


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