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SATA vs. NVMe. Lower SSD life expectancy?


Best Answer iammykyl , 29 November 2018 - 11:16 PM

Your welcome. Go to the full post »


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#1
jmcchau

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Hi,

 

After learning what the differences are between the Read/Write speeds of SATA-based SSD's, and NVMe-based, a thought occurred to me:

 

With NVMe drives being up to 4 times faster (32Gb/s vs. 6 Gb/s), could that mean that they can potentially reach the end of their useful service life up to four times sooner?

 

Since this particular issue is never addressed in any of the tech articles/video's that I've seen, I'm guessing this isn't the straight-up case that I am making it out to be above, but it would still be cool to hear a reasoned explanation of what actually is the case with regard to NVMe enabled SSD's, and whatever its actual impact is (or could be) on drive life expectancy.

 

Any takers?


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#2
iammykyl

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Hi,

 

With NVMe drives being up to 4 times faster (32Gb/s vs. 6Gb/s), could that mean that they can potentially reach the end of their useful service life up to four times sooner?

 

what actually is the case with regard to NVMe enabled SSD's, and whatever its actual impact is (or could be) on drive life expectancy.

 

Any takers?

 

 

Gday jmcchau .

The performance speed is not a factor, it depends on 

Drive Writes Per Day (DWPD)  and Terabytes Written (TBW) which is almost always related to the warranty of the card.

If you purchase a SSD with 3 years warranty and an M.2 with 5 years warranty, and they were the same capacity; the SSD would probably die first as it's total TBW would be a lot less.

 

This Blog give more insight. > https://blogs.techne...nding-dwpd-tbw/


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#3
jmcchau

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Cool man, thanks!


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#4
iammykyl

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✓  Best Answer

Your welcome.


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