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What Linux distro to choose?


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#16
EMCguy

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Cool. Thanks. That is one of the reasons I wanted to get a linux distro. :tazz:
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#17
enigmamachine

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:tazz:
hi, i'm very new with linux, now i try to install it (suse 9.3) with windows xp sp2, so i use partition magic to partition and make multiboot and i install it at my slave hdd, is it correct? i'm worry to do some mistake.
thank you.
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#18
dsenette

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enigmamachine...please post your question in a new topic...don't just stick a question in someone elses
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#19
Pri3st

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I'm relatively new to linux (been using it for about a week now :tazz: ) and I chose to use knoppix because you can boot it straight from the cd without have to install anything. You can get it at http://www.knoppix.net. I will eventually get a real distro but I think knoppix is good tool to familiarize myself with linux.

Edited by Pri3st, 11 August 2005 - 09:37 AM.

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#20
EMCguy

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Ubuntu update

I continue to enjoy my Live ubuntu CD. Had trouble with Firefox connecting very slowly with many web sites, but Google led me to a fairly simple fix. And I have to give ubuntu credit for actually sending me a set of 12 Live CD, and a set of 12 install cd. They said ti would take four to six weeks and It took about 6 weeks.

My only compliant is that the GUI is so nice in Ubuntu, I am not learning Linux from the command line :tazz:
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#21
RAz

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the best linux for beginners is RedHat... it has a lot of menu configuration tools...
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#22
thenotch

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Here is my 2 cents...

For ease of use and installation SuSE 9.3 and Mandriva by far outweigh ANY distro (yes, including Fedora and Red Hat 9). Installing programs is very simple for beginners and configuration is pretty much self explanitory during installation. YaST (SuSE 9.3) is a great tool for newcomers to configure their system with. I listed Mandriva because I have used Mandrake (not Mandriva yet) and assume it is very close to Mandrake which was always a no-brainer to set-up and work with.

Fedora Core 4 would be next on the list. I wouldn't suggest Red Hat 9 simply because the kernel is outdated and getting any type of updates from the RH is a pain in the rear. Fedora is supported and easy to work with.

I would also suggest Ubuntu. The setup is nowhere near as easy as SuSE, Mandriva or Fedora, but upgrading and adding packages is pretty easy to do once installed.

I have only slightly toyed with Yoper, Mepis and Knoppix. The installs were a bit cumbersome IMHO. Once installed they seemed ok, but again, the installation seemed more obtruse than other distros.

On the hard end you would have Slackware, Debian, and Gentoo. Of course you could stick any of the BSD's in there (OpenBSD, FreeBSD, etc) but they are not technically Linux distros. Gentoo by far is the hardest to install. It takes patience and some CLI knowledge to make it work. You also have to know your system inside and out. Of these three Slackware would be the easiest to install. Partitioning and setting up packages (if you don't use "All" that is) is probably the hardest part. You also have to configure your /etc/inittab file if you want the distro to boot into runlevel 5 as runlevel 3 is default. Debian I have only toyed with and honestly wasn't all that impressed. There is a new version (finally) and at least the GUI and kernel have finally been updated. I think since Debian is owned by a specific company that's why it takes so long for upgrades.

So if I was a newbie to Linux my suggestion would probably be SuSE 9.3. It is easy to install, easy to configure, easy to update, easy to navigate, works a LOT like Windows, is stable, has decent support and HOWTO's and is well maintained.

So I guess this would be my order as far as ease and functionality:

SuSE 9.3 Pro
Mandriva 10.2
Fedora Core 4
Ubuntu 5.04
Slackware
Yoper, Mepis, Knoppix (mostly because of clunky installation)
Gentoo
Debian

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#23
linuxsmudge

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I stumbled upon this post and had to register just to add a few thoughts.

Whoever said games can't be played on a linux computer?? (a.k.a. a tuxbox).

I have used windows from day 1 and use it alongside my main tuxboxes. I actually use linux to run my games as it is a great deal faster. Without the excessive windows bulkware running in the background. There are many fully supported games here, and those that aren't can usually be installed with cedega or wine Currently supported. Cedega is a purpose built windows emulator concentrating on gaming, where as wine/win4lin/winex is a general windows emulator.

Many say linux is hard to learn or configure. It does have it's moments sure, but rather than become an expert at 'house-keeping' a windows box with regedit, defrag, virus scanners and other mundane and 'unskilled' chores, there is an eliment of fun in tweaking a linux machine to work well as it is also rewarding you will unix 'skills'. When it does, it's exceptional.

Grab a magazine on Linux, preferably one with a disc and have a read.

Some news updates -

EU says no to software patents (This means threat free development to the open sourced 'community')
DVD John cracks windows media codec (now you can play this crappy codec freely and without giving up security information)

Which distro? Well that's a personal choice but they are all free to try! Personally don't think you could go too far wrong with a debain based distro as installation of programs is pretty straight forward.

Edited by linuxsmudge, 04 September 2005 - 06:04 PM.

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#24
Fat2000

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Here is my 2 cents...

For ease of use and installation SuSE 9.3 and Mandriva by far outweigh ANY distro (yes, including Fedora and Red Hat 9). Installing programs is very simple for beginners and configuration is pretty much self explanitory during installation. YaST (SuSE 9.3) is a great tool for newcomers to configure their system with. I listed Mandriva because I have used Mandrake (not Mandriva yet) and assume it is very close to Mandrake which was always a no-brainer to set-up and work with.

Fedora Core 4 would be next on the list. I wouldn't suggest Red Hat 9 simply because the kernel is outdated and getting any type of updates from the RH is a pain in the rear. Fedora is supported and easy to work with.

I would also suggest Ubuntu. The setup is nowhere near as easy as SuSE, Mandriva or Fedora, but upgrading and adding packages is pretty easy to do once installed.

I have only slightly toyed with Yoper, Mepis and Knoppix. The installs were a bit cumbersome IMHO. Once installed they seemed ok, but again, the installation seemed more obtruse than other distros.

On the hard end you would have Slackware, Debian, and Gentoo. Of course you could stick any of the BSD's in there (OpenBSD, FreeBSD, etc) but they are not technically Linux distros. Gentoo by far is the hardest to install. It takes patience and some CLI knowledge to make it work. You also have to know your system inside and out. Of these three Slackware would be the easiest to install. Partitioning and setting up packages (if you don't use "All" that is) is probably the hardest part. You also have to configure your /etc/inittab file if you want the distro to boot into runlevel 5 as runlevel 3 is default. Debian I have only toyed with and honestly wasn't all that impressed. There is a new version (finally) and at least the GUI and kernel have finally been updated.  I think since Debian is owned by a specific company that's why it takes so long for upgrades.

So if I was a newbie to Linux my suggestion would probably be SuSE 9.3. It is easy to install, easy to configure, easy to update, easy to navigate, works a LOT like Windows, is stable, has decent support and HOWTO's and is well maintained.

So I guess this would be my order as far as ease and functionality:

SuSE 9.3 Pro
Mandriva 10.2
Fedora Core 4
Ubuntu 5.04
Slackware
Yoper, Mepis, Knoppix (mostly because of clunky installation)
Gentoo
Debian

View Post


I personally use Slackware on my new TUXBox. As for Games in a TUXbox, well we Linux Enthusiasts know how to LAN party and we use TUXBoxes. Although I am not a very prolific fragger I do well for myself. Anywho, best linux? Personal preference. I say try once and when you find what you are confortable with then that is the best Linux Distro for you. So, here my list of preference like @thenotch;

SuSE 9.3 Pro :)
Mandriva 10.2 :)
Fedora Core 4 or Redhat 9 :)
Slackware 10 :tazz:
Knoppix :ph34r:
Arklinux :tazz:
Gentoo :ph34r:
Debian :) If you are an advanced user.


Well, you decide. :)

PS. I am going 100% Linux soon and am getting rid of my Dual Boot. Soon I will be online with my TUXBox only. :tazz:

Edited by Fat2000, 19 September 2005 - 04:45 AM.

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#25
Thef0rce

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fedora core 4. I like how pretty it looks, even though I do almost everything using the command line lol.

but slackware is a very close second :tazz:
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#26
fleamailman

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For fear of starting a thread that is too close to this one, please forgive this newbie who is looking for some os that is joy with those old P2 the university chucks into the skip here, they are on window 98 which no longer has backups packs, etc., but I don't want to waste an XP licence on them: what do you think, if there is enough meat on this question I will start a new thread then, if not, a quick footnote reply plz.
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#27
EMCguy

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Id start a new thread asking for best linux on P2. In fact, If you dont I will :tazz:
Ive got some old ones lying aorund here too.

best regards,

EMCguy
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#28
Fat2000

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Hi Everyone,

I have been using Slackware and Redhat. But, lately I have been looking into Fedora Core and Mandriva (formerly Mandrake) and I gotta tell you that Fedora core is a very attractive Distro but how is it's funtionality? Well anywho, I will know soon because I am planning on getting a copy from a buddy of mine as soon as he makes it available to me. I am still a Slackware fan. :tazz:

Truly,
Fat2000
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#29
Game_Freak

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Are these like free Operating Systems?
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#30
Fat2000

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Are these like free Operating Systems?

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Well Game_Freak,

Not exactly but some can be obtained freely by downloading from mirror site providers and some you would have to pay a little something. I for instance obtained my first copy of Slackware from the public Library. I borrowed a book on how to use Linux and it included a copy of Slackware 3.5 to be used freely by anyone. Now, you can get more info on the Free software licensing from the GNU project. just go to the following site: www.gnu.org and you will get a better answer that what I have given you. :tazz:

Truly,
Fat2000
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