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New Network/Server


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#1
TDG

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Can someone please tell me how long it should take to setup four new computers (one is a laptop), as well as a new server? A new network will also be created at the same time with approx. ten computers on it.

I have been quoted a minimum of 25 hours (billable by the hour), and I have no idea if this is reasonable or not (never having setup a new network/server, etc.)

Thanks for any comments!
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#2
DHooper

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Are they new computers?? Are they going to install a new fresh OS?? Are you asking for them to custmize the OS?? What is the server for?? Do you have the wires already run?? Do you have the patch cables for the computers?? With all of this being done(with cables being run) it should only take about 15 hours, without cables being run no more the 20 Hours.
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#3
TDG

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Hey - thanks for answering! This is all slightly over my head, but I'll try to answer the questions.... <_<

There will be four new computers/six old. I'm not sure what an OS is??? The server is for a business and everything (wires, etc.) is already in place. Whoever comes in will just need to replace the server, create a network and hook everyone up.....

25 hours is what I was quoted (as a minimum - they were saying a full day to get the 4 new computers configured and another 8-12 hours for the server, plus a few hours for misc. tasks) - Would you still say that under 20 hours is more reasonable.... Or do you think they are about right?

Thanks! :D
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#4
DHooper

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OS is short for Operating System.

If that is all they are going to be doing then I would say that 10 - 12 hours is all that anyone should need, and nomore then 15 hours.

I can get 5 computers up and running from a formated hard drive to the installation of windows and it config for a network in about 8 hours. For the server I would say about 6 - 10 hours to get it setup depending on the OS.

Who is doing the installation of all of this, is it a single guy doing this or 2-3 guys doing it??
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#5
TDG

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:D Oops - I guess OS should have been pretty obvious! Oh well - live and learn....

I don't have anyone signed on to do this work yet. I am still in the process of getting quotes, but the first one that came through (from the networking group my company has always used) was for the minimum of 25 hours. I assume it was only going to be one or two guys...

So, anyway - I sort of questioned them and didn't feel comfortable with their answers (which were sort of run around), but didn't know if they were being straight with me or not (b/c I'm obviously lacking some computer knowledge <_< ).

So, now I am in the process of getting two other quotes. One from Dell and one from another networking group.

Thanks so much for all your help - I was sort of thrown into this IT role at my office when our computers/server started dying and it's a little scary!!!

Hope you have a great holiday! :D
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#6
DHooper

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Just a rule of thumb, its always better to have to opions then one.

Now, if you want to better your computer knowledge I would go to a local book store and pick up a "A+ Study Guide" book. Microsoft has a good book on this subject.

PC Hardware and A+ Handbook

I wouldnt do this for your company, but for your own. You will be better informed on this subject of computers, and you understand it more ask the boss could you get a pay raise for knowing this information <_< (May need to get certi for this) The test isnt that hard to pass it is broken in to two parts, hardware and software. You can take one test and have up to 3 months later to take the other test.

Now a good book to get for networking would be the "Cisco CCNA Study Guide" book. The only books I would get for this subject are the ones from Cisco Press and SYBEX. I have books from both companys.
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#7
Spank_Me

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Hey TDG

I'm sorry but there are too many factors involved to "set a time", the server should be the biggest time killer, depending on what server you will be using. Ex. Window 2000 Server, if you are configuring a Domain, Policies, Active Directory, OU structures, User accounts, printers, You can have 2 guys speading 25 hours on this alone.

Workstations are pretty much straight forward, until you get into restrictions, usually installing from CD, SPs, critical updates, apps, I would guess 3-4 hours on each one, gotta love the reboots.

A+ will help, but it does not teach you very much about setting up domains, policies, for that you will have to take server courses, serveral courses, that is why the MCSE exam is 7 parts, recommended that you have 2 or more years in the field first. Don't get me wrong, alot of companies are happy to have a A+ cert on hand. <_<
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#8
DHooper

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I said that the server would be the one thing that takes the most time.

With the A+ thing, I said that it would be good for basic info on computers because he said that he lackes in computer knowalge. I was tell him that to understand how computers work that he should look at A+ as a starting point.

I myself have studied A+, Network+, CCNA, CCNP, and starting on the MCSE. I have goten my A+, and CCNA. I nerved got Network+ b/c of taken CCNA I felt taking Network+ would be a waste of time, and money(But I got the Stuidy Guide for it to read for a Self Study). I plan on going to ITT Tech next year in the fall to get my Associates in Computer Network Systems (Applied Computer Science Degree). When Im done with that I plan on getting my Bachelors in Information Systems Security, & Data Communication Systems Technology (Computer Science Degree). By the way Spank_Me, what cerits do you have?? <_<
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#9
TDG

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Hey Guys -
Thanks for the opinions!! I think I will try to pick up the books recommended - I'm always up for learning something new...

Best of luck DHooper with your upcoming school endeavors and thanks for all the help! I'm sure I'll be back! <_<
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#10
Spank_Me

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DHooper

I did not mean to sound like getting A+ is a bad thing, but in order to learn the basics of a cp, not just hardware (Proccessor speeds of the cpu ), DOS commands, which can be very helpful, but the basics of the OS, which, honestly A+ does not really help without boring you to tears. For general knowledge of the OS, even Office programs I would and have used the Dummies series. For more info you will have to get the more technical books and even read, help me here, RFC (Requests for Comments) which can be very dry.

For my qualifications, I have taken a 2 year University course for Network Administration, have my MCSA 2000 cert, MCP in Windows XP, A+, and N+ and have been an onsite cp tech for a company for just over 2 years now. I am currently studying to upgrade my MCSA to 2003, finish up getting my MCSE 2003 and have started taking some MOUS certification training. Believe me, if you become a tech, the most issues you will have to deal with is applications, why Word does not work, Outlook, Access data bases.
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#11
DHooper

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Before I grad. High School, the school was had test that the students could take for MOUS. I took and passed the Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook. I nevered had the time to learn Access or Frontpage. I also want tp learn C++, and VB. I sorry that I came across [edited for language] in my last post, I didnt mean it in that tone. Now for the MCSA should I take a self-study, or take it in a classroom.

admin: this is a family forum, accessible by all. Please keep it clean. <_<
(Also, back on topic, or take it to a new post.)

Edited by admin, 30 November 2004 - 10:37 PM.

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