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I keep losing my signal/Wireless


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#1
Ldynte

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I just bought a new computer. HP - Centrino - XP - With Wireless.
1.7GHz
593 MHz, 504MB of RAM


I have a 2yr old Linksys WRT54G Wireless G/2.4 GHz Router.

Since I started using my new computer, the wireless router keeps tanking on me. I go from Excellent : 54Mbs to Low 11 MBs and lose my signal. My Internet shuts down and so do my IM's.

I tried downloading from LInksys, but I have no idea what I'm doing. .

I might need new firmware, maybe?
If I do...what do I download, and what do I do with it?


Any help would be amazing!!!!!

Edited by Ldynte, 29 August 2005 - 09:35 PM.

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#2
RockyIV

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Use this to download WinsockXPFix! It repairs the internet connection!
http://www.geekstogo..._Log-t2852.html
It is located under 'Preparation'
Hope it Works!!
RockyIV
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#3
Ldynte

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Yikes!

I forgot to go to the home page. I've used this in the past and totally forgot about those trouble shooting things.

:)

I'll try that out tonight.

I'll be back if that doesn't work.

:tazz:
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#4
Ldynte

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Darn.

I did the service pack and it helped for a bit, but it's still acting up.

Grrrrr.

I got so excited because it was working fine for about 15 mins. And bam! Back to the fluctuating Speed.

I have a RoadRunner Cable modem. Could it be the modem? IT's an older version, perhaps it's the culprit?

Maybe I need firmware for the Linksys?

:tazz:

Any help would be appreciated.



Tara
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#5
SpaceCowboy706

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Question 1
What connectivity manager are you using for the wireless.

A) Manufacturer software for the wireless card,

B) or windows wireless zero configuration.

Question 2
Do you hvae security set on your router... meaning WEP, MAC Filter ect....(*sometimes security can cause you to drop out - espicially WEP)

Question 3
Was the wireless working fine before you got the new computer... if it was then you can rule out a bad modem and a bad router. If you never had wireless on it before the new computer, then it is possible your router is faulty.

Question 4
How much signal strength do you have... in locations throughout your house... Try going to were you get the best strength then stay there and see if it drops out.. it should fluctaute no more than one bar (anymore than that is bad). MY wireless hovers back and forth at 4 to 5 bars on green.

NOTE*
Modem firmware upgrades are only done through ISP providers as the firmware upgrades usually only relate to DOCSIS changes and most DOCSIS versions are on 2.0 (unless your on a old QAM64 modulation).

Router firmware upgrades usually only alter the manual configurations... Not important for the average user (you only need to know and worry about firmware upgrades if you are altering the router security or router firewall)

Answer the first 4 questions and and ill help you from there.
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#6
Ldynte

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A) Manufacturer software for the wireless card,

It's part of the system, It's an HP, came with the computer.



B) or windows wireless zero configuration.

I guess this one...it was set up on the computer itself.


Question 2
Do you hvae security set on your router... meaning WEP, MAC Filter ect....(*sometimes security can cause you to drop out - espicially WEP)


No, just the regular Norton Antivirus and the firewall, but no special extras. Beta Microsoft spyware...nothing that I didn't have on my other computer.

Question 3
Was the wireless working fine before you got the new computer... if it was then you can rule out a bad modem and a bad router. If you never had wireless on it before the new computer, then it is possible your router is faulty.


Yes, it was working fine. I was in the same exact spot of the house as I am with the new computer/system. The old system, I had 5bars almost every time. (The router is in the adjacent room to me)

My only issue with the old computer was that whenever my phone rang I lost my connection if I answered the phone. (wireless phone same ghz as the router...could be why. Not sure though.)



Question 4
How much signal strength do you have... in locations throughout your house... Try going to were you get the best strength then stay there and see if it drops out.. it should fluctaute no more than one bar (anymore than that is bad). MY wireless hovers back and forth at 4 to 5 bars on green.


On my old system, I usually had 4-5 bars throughout the entire house. I would only lose my signal if I went outside. (It's a townhouse, not too much in the way of sq footage. LOL)

When I do have a signal, upstairs and downstairs I have at least 4-5 bars without issue, then it just plummets to low signal, (1 bar) and I lose whatever sites I'm on or IM service I'm using.

:tazz:

Veeeeeery annoying.

If I refresh (repair) the signal, it's okay (5 bars - excellent)...but only for about five mins before I lose it again.


Hope I answered these questions okay.




Tara
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#7
todd333

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Try using an external antenna for your router, download netstumbler and install it.
it will help you determine the strength of the signal in various parts of your house.
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#8
SpaceCowboy706

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If the Old Pc ran fine in the exact same spot and the new pc is not then it could be three possible problems...

1) the wireless device is not compatible with the Linksys router. Heres the link to the Linksys tech supports to see if it is compatible: http://www.linksys.c...FVisitorWrapper

2) The wireless device is faulty. New Cards have been known to be bad.. startling but true.

3) try using the wireless zero configuration utility with windows Xp heres how to enable it:

In order to make use of the WZC service, you must be using a compatible wireless network adapter. This is because the wireless network adapter and its Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) driver must support NDIS Object Identifiers (OIDs), which are used to query and set device and driver behavior. The wireless network adapter scans for available wireless networks and passes the network names (also known as Service Set Identifiers or SSIDs) to the WZC service. Your wireless manufacturer’s website should be able to tell you if your network adapter is compatible.

If, the Wireless Networks tab is missing from the Wireless Network Connection Properties window, then you’ll need to install the WZC service.

Before we get started, though, you need to make sure that your system has been configured to display hidden files. If it hasn’t, you’ll need to first open Windows Explorer, click Tools, and select Folder Options. Go to the View tab and scroll down until you come across the option “Show Hidden Files and Folders” and check it. Also, you’ll need to uncheck the option “Hide Protected Operating System Files (Recommended).” Click OK when finished.

Now to INSTALLl the Wireless Zero Configuration service on your system, just follow the procedure outline below:

1. Click the Start button, and then click Control Panel.

2. In the Control Panel window, if you’re in Category View, then under Pick a Category, double-click the Network and Internet Connections icon (if you’re in Classic View, click on the Network Connections icon and skip to step #4).

3. In the Network and Internet Connections window, under the Control Panel icon, double-click the Network Connections icon.

4. In the Network Connections window, under LAN or High Speed Internet, click to select the Local Area Connection icon.

5. On the menu bar, click File and select Properties from the file menu. (Altneratively, right-click on the Local Area Connection icon and select Properties from the context menu).

6. In the Local Area Connections Properties window, on the General tab, click the Install button.

7. In the Select Network Component Type window, in the Click the type of network box, click to select the Service icon.

8. Click the Add button.

9. In the Select Network Service window, click the Have Disk button.

10. Click the OK button.

11. In the Install From Disk window, click the Browse button.

12. In the Locate File window, browse to the C:\Windows\Inf folder (this is a hidden folder).

13. Click to select NETWZC.INF.

14. Click the Open button.

15. In the Install from Disk window, click the OK button.

16. In the Select Network Service window, in the Network Service box, select Microsoft as the manufacturer, and then click to select Wireless Zero Configuration.
17. Click the OK button.

At this point you’ll need to reboot your PC. With that completed, you should find that the Wireless Zero Configuration service has been successfully installed on your system and you should now have access to the Windows Network tab.

NOTE: If you don’t see the Wireless Network tab when you go back into the Network Properties Page, then the most likely reason is that the service did not start. To initialize it, open Administrative Tools in the Control Panel and select Services. Scroll down to Wireless Zero Configuration, Right-click on it, and select Start. The service is now enabled, and the Wireless Network tab will be visible in Network Properties

To configure automatic wireless network configuration, just follow these steps:

1. Open Network Connections.

2. Right-click Wireless Network Connection, and then click Properties.

3. On the Wireless Networks tab, do one of the following:

* To enable automatic wireless network configuration, select the Use Windows to configure my wireless network settings check box. This check box is selected by default.

* To disable automatic wireless network configuration, clear the Use Windows to configure my wireless network settings check box.

Windows XP will alert you when your network card detects signals from an available wireless network. In the list of Available networks, click the network name, and then click Configure.

Your wireless network card will be automatically configured to match the settings of that network and a network connection attempt will be made. If a network does not broadcast its network name, it will not appear under Available networks. To add a network that you know is available, under Preferred networks, click Add. In Wireless Network Properties, specify the network name (Service Set Identifier) and, if needed, the wireless network key settings. The list of available networks can be updated at any time by simply clicking Refresh.

If you are connecting to multiple wireless networks, your preferred network might not be at the top of the list. The order in which Windows XP attempts to connect with the preferred networks can easily be modified. Under Preferred networks, select the wireless network that you want to move to a new position on the list and then click the Move up or Move down button respectively.
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