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WIRELESS THEFT


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#1
SpaceCowboy706

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I am working on a paper, for school and I am needing a few "CLEAN" user quotes on the following subject: I am already aware of the current State Penal Codes and Federal Laws regarding this subject.

Scenario 1
I am sitting in the comfort of my own home and with my laptop I am able to detect a UNSECURED wireless broadcast (no wep, wpa - radius, mac filters of any sort). If I connect to this broadcast for internet access only (not to file or print share with the broadcaster) is this ???

Theft of service from the Broadcaster
OR
Just simply connecting to a service that is being broadcasted within the confines of my own residence
OR
any other opinion you may have on this...


Scenario 2
I am sitting in the comfort of my own home and with my laptop I am able to detect a SECURED wireless broadcast. If I connect to this broadcast through use of alternative methods for gaining internet access only... is this ????

Theft of service from the Broadcaster
OR
Just simply connecting to a service that is being broadcasted within the confines of my own residence
OR
any other opinion you may have on this...


AGAIN, I do not do this and I am not trying to promote any of these activities... I am a paying customer for my premium High Speed internet service. This is research for a school paper (Oklahoma State University).


~Kat~ has already approved this post in the Geek University area for helpers, and staff members... I misposted it in the public area before... my mistake.

Your replies are appreciated.
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#2
Danny

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Hi,

Senario 1

I believe it is all right to connect to the network, because if the person whose network it was, should have some brains to make it secure if they didn't want people to login to it.

Senario 2

By "cracking" into the secure network, this is technically stealing the network, because the person didn't want you to use it.

dk
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#3
dsenette

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scenario 1: by legal standards, walking through an ulocked door is still concidered breaking and entering. though, it's the homeowner's fault for not locking the door

scenario 2: breaking the door is definitly breaking and entering
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#4
SpaceCowboy706

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Thanks you both for your replies.. need 3 more.
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#5
ScHwErV

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Moved to Networking Forum.
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#6
Cough

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I'm with dsenet.

Scenario 1 is arguably a little grey - obviously the broadcaster doesnt care that he is sharing the access, but he actually is contravening his agreement with his ISP (probably, depending on ISP small print). Since I dont know what the ISP agreement says, I may not be breaking any laws if I join in.

Scenario 2 is definitely an attempt to unlock a door that is intended to be protected. If I get in, I know that I am breaking some sort of law.
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#7
heartofalion28

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Scenario 1- If a person isnt protecting themselves which takes all of ten minutes, if that, then maybe a break in or two is deserved to teach them a lesson.

Scenario 2- More fun for hackers but definately not legal.


Lion
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#8
todd333

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Walking in through an unlocked door in considered trespassing, not breaking and entering. Is it stealing if somebody is broadcasting a signal into your home? Perhaps the person who is broadcasting their signal through my walls into my home without my permission should be considered the tresspasser.

Edited by todd333, 01 September 2005 - 11:28 AM.

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#9
SpaceCowboy706

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AGAIN.. Thank you all.
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