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Super wireless notebook...


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#1
NullWolf

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THE REVOLUTION BEGINS

The notebook does not employ a Hard Disk and is completely based on solid state AtomChip® optoelectronics [except the mechanical Optical Drive: DVD Super Multi].

The new non-volatile Quantum-Optical RAM increases the speed of the system, since there is no need to refresh information after every cycle of reading of information, unlike regular RAM.

The new AtomChip® Quantum® II processor with 256MB on-board memory has a high speed with very low consumption of electrical energy.

http://atomchip.com/_wsn/page4.html



Ummm... I dunno about you... but I want one...
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#2
admin

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I think they're selling snake oil. :)

I try to keep pretty current with hardware trends, and I haven't heard of ANY of those components. :tazz:
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#3
NullWolf

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Yeah, I'm doing searches right now... would be nice though...

EDIT:
Apparently noone's too sure right now...

So, either this is like cold fusion and it's a hoax, or we are about to see a fundamental paradigm shift that completely redefines the nature of computer storage. A typical hard-disk bay could hold many terabytes of this Quantum-Optical memory.
We will see...

http://electronics.h...om/ces20047.htm

I'm not an engineer, so I dunno...
Patent

Probably theoretically possible... what would be the point of such a thing if its a hoax... cost for different products range in the $100s to the $1000s...

Maybe on same level as "Free Energy"... someone needs to call Mythbusters...

Edited by NullWolf, 07 September 2005 - 04:03 PM.

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#4
NullWolf

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Shoulda edited last entry

Edited by NullWolf, 07 September 2005 - 04:03 PM.

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#5
warriorscot

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From what i read when researching quantum mechanics for my advanced physics class last year the opto electronics and quantum electronics are both fields in infancy. An optical based computer prototype has been built by heriot watt university and as far as i had heard they were the only people that far with the technology. Quantum based computer technology is still in the theory stages and has many practical problems like the fact as they are mulitple state devices(current thinking a first prototype would be 7 states) and this would be incompatible with all our two state hardware and software and much more complex to code and understand. This is all from memory and is accurate as far as i know from march ish.

So i agree with admin they are trying to flog chocolate fire guards, also the site is pretty crummy for a company with a technology if real that would be worth millions before it shiped a single unit.
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#6
meighnot

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I remember working with footprint-board computers sometime around five years ago while I was trying to do a little college project designing a CD-ROM MP3 portable player, and even with the tiny amount of storage that was on it (we put the OS into flash memory. RedHat Linux), those things were ungodly expensive.

Upping the amount of storage space, especially attempting to use quantum electron states during this time in which quantum digital logic is not exactly an established science is something I'd have to see to believe. Theories about using quantum states of electrons (there are 32, from what I recall) abound, but so I've yet to see an actual implementation of it, much less on a consumer product.

Not only that, but they'd have to re-base the numbering system used by the computers in order to use a multi-state digital logic. Today's computers all use binary because they two-state (on/off 1/0 binary) digital logic. There either is a voltage, or there isn't, and that works well for things like transistors and other solid state switches. Start introducing more states and you no longer have just the clearly defined yes/no true/false type operations of Boolean maths being performed.

I don't doubt that some day it will be possible, but I remain skeptical as to whether today is that day, especially when it comes to consumer goods.

Also, (and I'm not versed in patent law), I do believe it's possible to obtain a patent on a quantum processing device as long as you've actually created one. It doesn't actually have to work.
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