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Losing Internet Connection during Standby


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#1
GovtCheese

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I just installed a fresh copy of XP a few days ago, and I'm having problems with losing my internet connection every time my computer goes into standby mode.

Does anyone have any ideas why this might be happening?

Thanks in advance!
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#2
FreddieKrugerGuy

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Hi, I'm Freddie.

Have a look at your modem settings. You might find something related to your problem there.

Freddie
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#3
GovtCheese

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It's not a modem problem, I'm on broadband.
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#4
FreddieKrugerGuy

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In that case, get your connection clean and fresh. In other words, try reinstalling your connection and then download the latest drivers for your wireless broadband device.

Freddie
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#5
cyberCrank

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This is normal behavior:

SYMPTOMS
When you place a Windows XP-based computer on standby, any currently connected remote access connections are silently disconnected. You are not prompted to disconnect manually before the computer goes on standby. This applies to any remote access connections, including connections to Internet service providers (ISPs) and private networks.

CAUSE
Windows XP silently disconnects any active connections before entering standby. When the computer resumes from standby, you must manually reconnect any remote access connections before you can use them.

STATUS
This behavior is by design.

Many ISPs will disconnect modems anyway after extended periods of "inactivity", and is one of the advantages of cable or DSL as you are now doing (as noted by you using broadband of some form...).

Also, when I use a cable modem and a system goes into standby all Ethernet lights go out, then on "wake up" it retains/reactivates its connections (adapter, TCP/IP active, firewall, etc.), but during Standby it (the adapter) remains down and the Ethernet connection even goes "out" (lights out, no bandwidth usage, etc.) as currently configured, but on wake-up it behaves properly as though it had never been off...

Install SP2 if you have not already, then you may want to right click on your desktop (or Control Panel) Network Connections and right click on your "Local Area Connction" and "Repair" and see if it can clear or repair any potential problems/settings it finds; SP2 has has some nice new features added for repairing wireless broadband too (if you are using wireless)...

Good Luck!

Edited by cyberCrank, 10 September 2005 - 09:56 AM.

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#6
FreddieKrugerGuy

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It can't be "normal". I don't have the problem.

Freddie

Edited by FreddieKrugerGuy, 10 September 2005 - 10:41 AM.

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#7
cyberCrank

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According to Microsoft's TechNet and other users, it is "normal" behavior for "normal" modems (that is for remote connections to be closed before going into standby mode). But I too find that the cable modems (although the Ethernet card actually shuts down with lights out) that I use remain active and connections after "awakening" from Standby connections resume automatically (i.e., requires no manual connections).

Thats why suggestion to use the "Repair" on the connection.

Also you many want to systematically ping your way out to the gateway to see if the local TCP/IP stack is up and running and "responding", any router is responding, the cable modem is responding, your gateway, etc.

e.g. local
Ping 127.0.0.1

for something like a Linksys router:
Ping 192.168.1.1

For something like your modem:
Ping 192.168.100.1

then your gateway address, etc.

Find out your IPs for each and ping your way out to track down if you get a response and "see" each starting locally and walking your way out...

I do something very similar to this to help diagnostics and to capture a log of the responses (plus trace routes too) and to also debug network links in the process, sort of like this CMD file:
Echo Off

Echo Getting date and time
date /T > "NetworkDiagnostics.log"
time /T >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"

Echo ************* 1 of 10 ***************
Echo Pinging internal IP for diagnostics
Echo ************* 1 of 10 *************** >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"
Echo Pinging internal IP for diagnostics >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"
Echo Pinging 127.0.0.0 local
Ping 127.0.0.1 >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"

Echo ************* 2 of 10 ***************
Echo Pinging 192.168.1.1 Local Linksys
Echo ************* 2 of 10 *************** >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"
Echo Pinging 192.168.1.1 Local Linksys >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"
Ping 192.168.1.1 >> "NetworkDiagnostics.log"
.
.
.

Exit

Run something like this before going into (when things are working) and after coming out of Standby (when the connection seems to be off) to see what response you get, which may help. Doing the "Repair" may cure a problem, so try it before the "Repair" operation maybe.

Edited by cyberCrank, 10 September 2005 - 02:27 PM.

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