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voltage selector


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#1
fay47

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I have a question about the voltage selector switch on the computer.

I know that it the US we use 110-120 and the voltage selector should be set there. I know that other countires, or at least some others, use 220-240 and it should be set that way. I know the power supply converts the AC current to DC - 12, 5, 3.3 or soemthing like that. I have no idea how this works though.

I have read that in the US setting the selector for 220-240 would not do any damage, but the computer would not work. I have also read that in countries that have 220-240 - setting the selector to 110 could damage the computer.

I am sure that to those of you that know about these things this is a dumb question but I would appreciate an explanation. What happens when you change the switch? Does the power supply contain sepearate circuity for the different incomming voltages? Does it hav to do with the way the AC current is converted to DC?

Can anyone give a simple explanation of this?
:tazz:
Thanks, Fay
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#2
austin_o

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Hi and welcome to Geeks to Go. Not a dumb question, just a basic electronics question. The power supply uses a transformer to reduce the ac voltage, and then uses a rectifier circuit to change it to dc. When the power supply selector switch is moved, it is changing the transformer coil selection inside of the power supply. If you choose 110-120 and then apply 220-240, you get too much voltage and thus too much current, maybe even some smoke as it over heats and burns up. If you select 220-240 and then apply 110-120 nothing happens because the coils selected inside of the power supply are not getting the voltage needed to work properly. This puts the process in simple terms. You can get much more detail if you want. Use google and you will find it, or ask me for a link.
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#3
fay47

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Thanks a lot for the reply. I may do some further research on it later to get a better understanding, but your answer told me what I wanted to know for now.

Again, thanks for the reply.

Fay
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#4
fay47

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On second thought, if you have a link, go ahead and give it to me.

Thanks, Fay
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#5
austin_o

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This is absolutely the best electronics link I have ever found
http://www.epanorama.net/index.php

They have a link to
http://www.epanorama.../links/psu.html

which has a link to
http://www.epanorama...u_computer.html

Excellent source for everything you ever wanted to know about anything electronic.
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#6
fay47

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Thans you for the links. Looks like I am going to have to install a pop up blocker to be able to do much reading there. I think I had one at one time but must have gotten rid of it some way.

Anyway, thanks for the links.

Fay
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