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? about Cookies index file


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#1
novice2

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In C:\Windows\Cookies there is a file called "index". When I try to delete it, I get a message saying access to the file is denied. Does this file contain info about my computer that can be accessed from the internet?
Are there other places on my system I should be checking for cookies?

Also, what is the best (free) protection against cookies? I have Ad Aware, Spybot, CWShredder and HiJackThis. With Ad Aware, the same list of files shows up EVERY time I scan (list of skins, etc.) even when I haven't used the media player since the last time.

I do know that turning off cookies would limit my access to many websites (see, I'm not entirely stupid :tazz: but I'm wondering if there's a better way than having to constantly run these programs?

Thanks!
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#2
Retired Tech

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Do Cookies Compromise Security?

Cookies are messages that a Web server transmits to a Web browser so that the Web server can keep track of the user's activity on a specific Web site. The message that the Web server conveys to the browser is in the form of an HTTP header that consists of a text-only string. The text is entered into the memory of the browser. The browser in turn stores the cookie information on the hard drive so when the browser is closed and reopened at a later date the cookie information is still available.
Web sites use cookies for several different reasons:

To collect demographic information about who is visiting the Web site. Sites often use this information to track how often visitors come to the site and how long they remain on the site.

To personalize the user's experience on the Web site. Cookies can help store personal information about you so that when you return to the site you have a more personalized experience. If you have ever returned to a site and have seen your name mysteriously appear on the screen, it is because on a previous visit you gave your name to the site and it was stored in a cookie so that when you returned you would be greeted with a personal message. A good example of this is the way some online shopping sites will make recommendations to you based on previous purchases. The server keeps track of what you purchase and what items you search for and stores that information in cookies.

To monitor advertisements. Web sites will often use cookies to keep track of what ads it lets you see and how often you see ads.

Cookies do not act maliciously on computer systems. They are merely text files that can be deleted at any time - they are not plug ins nor are they programs. Cookies cannot be used to spread viruses and they cannot access your hard drive. This does not mean that cookies are not relevant to a user's privacy and anonymity on the Internet. Cookies cannot read your hard drive to find out information about you; however, any personal information that you give to a Web site, including credit card information, will most likely be stored in a cookie unless you have turned off the cookie feature in your browser. In only this way are cookies a threat to privacy. The cookie will only contain information that you freely provide to a Web site.

Cookies have six parameters that can be passed to them:

The name of the cookie.

The value of the cookie.

The expiration date of the cookie - this determines how long the cookie will remain active in your browser.

The path the cookie is valid for - this sets the URL path the cookie us valid in. Web pages outside of that path cannot use the cookie.

The domain the cookie is valid for - this takes the path parameter one step further. This makes the cookie accessible to pages on any of the servers when a site uses multiple servers in a domain.

The need for a secure connection - this indicates that the cookie can only be used under a secure server condition, such as a site using SSL.

Both Netscape and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) can be set to reject cookies if the user prefers to use the Internet without enabling cookies to be stored. In Netscape, follow the Edit/Preferences/Advanced menu and in IE, follow the Tools/Internet Options/Security menu to set cookie preferences.

Lou Montulli, currently the protocols manager in Netscape's client product division, wrote the cookies specification for Navigator 1.0, the first browser to use the technology. Montulli says there's nothing particularly amusing about the origin of the name: 'A cookie is a well-known computer science term that is used when describing an opaque piece of data held by an intermediary. The term fits the usage precisely; it's just not a well-known term outside of computer science circles.

You can use the cleaning option of CCleaner to clear cookies each time the PC is booted with options, settings, run cleaner at start up

http://www.filehippo...nload_ccleaner/

If you use the scan for issues option, always use the back up option before removing anything
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#3
novice2

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"If you use the scan for issues option, always use the back up option before removing anything."

OK, I downloaded CCCleaner but I can't find the back up option.



So let's say I log onto a website, they can see what other websites I was on, if they and those other websites have the same server, correct?

Can they see what is in my Favorites file? What about Outlook Express? Can they see who I receive emails from and the subject lines?
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#4
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Not with cookies

CCleaner has an issues tab, below the cleaner

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