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processors


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#1
lamuskrat

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Could you good folk here please explain the difference in some of the cpu's out there and when to use which one.


Example: when would you go dual core over a higher ghz (speed), I am really confused in this matter and it really affects the $$$ you spend. (amd 64 x2 4400 or pentium D vs pentium 3.8 with HT )


system for business, internet, digital media
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#2
Seven!

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I'm not familiar with the extremities of Dual Core processing, but my advice to you is to look past the clock speed that people advertise.

Caches:
You see, processors have caches of separate levels (generally L1, L2), and each takes longer to access. It's like having a pizza made, or getting a pizza from Domino's, or making the pizza yourself - each takes a little bit longer.

Celeron processors have tiny L2 caches. I used to run a Celeron D at 3.1GHz, and eventually purchased a Pentium IV. The difference was startling. Though the PIV was clocked at 3GHz, it's level two cache was quite larger (2MB as opposed to the Celeron's 512k).

Front Side Bus:
Clock speed means very little these days when compared to the awesome things that people have been doing with the Front Side Bus (AMD processors use a similar application called the HTT, but you can consider it the same thing for now).

I hope this helps somewhat =]

Edited by Seven!, 02 January 2006 - 08:01 PM.

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#3
warriorscot

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Dual cores are essentially two cpus on a single chip they are linked together so they can share the workload and when an OS or app that can make use of dual cores is used you see a large performance boost, it also gives you true multitasking you can run completely simultaneously two programs without detrimentally affecting the other.

I would go with the 4400+ its the big daddy of the chips at the moment not to expensive but it has all the right numbers and overclocks well.
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#4
anoobrew

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I dont care for Intels but when it comes to business you gotta go with them, which processor to buy depends on what type of applications you will be running.

But if you go dual-core DONT buy Intel

If you're fine w/ single corehttp://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16819116220

In the end, your budget is the deciding factor.

Sidenote P4s may claim 3.8 but thats not the actual clock speed
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#5
Hemal

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I still have to go with Warrior Scott-- AMD hands down- overclock-able and they are very nice to run

Look for a socket 939 and a 64 bit- much less money

If you are looking for dualcore the 4400 are very nice as mentioned-- I dont think you really need dual core right now unless you have the budget for it- then it would be a very nice upgrade- you will see some difference
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#6
lamuskrat

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That is all I'm looking to do right now is upgrade, since I have the $$$. I too like AMD. I have only 1 P4 (3.06) and in all honesty I think my sons Athlon XP 2000+ is as fast (his 1 gig ddr and my 1.5 gig ddr)


Probably will go with the 4400 X2
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#7
Hemal

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def. dual core- or fx series- but for what you are doing- the dual core would make more sense
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#8
warriorscot

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Yeah depends on what your running but thats also affected by the apps not all applications even if they are business apps use hyperthreading so an intel isnt good.

You get more for your money with an AMD cpu, would definately reccomend the 4400+ its the best chip on the market that most can afford.
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