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CPU cooling


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#1
afg34

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Is the "Zalman-CNPS7000B-AlCu Ultra Quiet" good enough to OC Opteron 165 to 2.8ghz??

If not what about the 7700??
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#2
warriorscot

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Aye probably, depends on what batch your opterons from and how well you install the HSF as to how high the heat output will be.

For serious overclocking i would look into thermalright they have the best coolers.
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#3
afg34

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Does it support all socket 939 or just the Athlon 64 and the FX series as in here:
http://www.zalman.co...dx=146&code=009
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#4
afg34

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Can you explain your first sentence("depends on what batch your opterons from and how well you install the HSF as to how high the heat output will be") a little bit more please. I am getting this with my new computer so a local store will install it for me. And what about the 7700 vs the 7000.
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#5
Hammm

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i think the 7700 maybe overall best for the whole board because it spits out air alover the mobo. but for a dedicated cooler you will want the Zalman CNPS9500. they are the real heavyweights. One guy got his machine up to 4.25 Ghz on a P4 from 3.4Ghz. so CNPS9500 is for the real cooling only for the CPU. 7700 and 7000 cooler the whole mobo. If you want good overall cooling get the 7700, looks better too. but for OC, you really want to get a water cooler, but a neat thing about the 9500 is it is almost silent, a good thing to have in the office or at your homePC. it's nice to have a slight hum to let you know you are still in the room but not a growl of badly made 120mm fans
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#6
warriorscot

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Its pretty simple not all chips are made equally chips from the second or third run of chips are often better than the tenth or eleventh run just before a retooling. For example some 3000+venice cpus overclock to 3Ghz with appropriate cooling, but others cant make it past 2.4Ghz-2.5Ghz and its luck what you get. And obviously if you make a rubbish job of installing the HSF you wont get very good cooling.

If you want to really overclock i would reccomend the thermalright HSFs they are pretty much the best on the market and they arent to heavy either and cool the board as well.

If it supports a 940 opteron it will support a 939 there physical dimensions are all the same in terms of the chip as they all have the heat spreader over the chips these days.

To overclock you really really dont need a water cooler and unless youre a complete nutter. A good air cooling will do more tha adequatley and it costs sever hundred quid for good water cooling and its not phenomenally safe thing to do either.

7700 vs 7000 go forth and read some reviews.
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#7
Hammm

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so what would be a good install of HSF in you're terms?
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#8
warriorscot

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Well, you put the right amount of thermal coompound on(not to much you need only a tiny amount) you get the HSF on quite quickly dont dither and it goes on first time. If you dither around and leave the material open to air for to long it loses some of it effectivness. Basically just do it right the way the instructions tell you
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#9
comanighttrain

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get good compound, makes a [bleep] of a difference.

and yeah itll do the job, as long as its in low noise mode as opposed to silent.

Edited by comanighttrain, 09 February 2006 - 10:00 AM.

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#10
Hammm

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yea sure, i can always practice installing the thing on until i'm good with it, the Zalman HSF comes with the compound, will that be good enough because they are pretty well known
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#11
comanighttrain

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id imagine so, its just that i have a gigabyte cooler (the ripoff 2004xp or something, its a piece of cack) and the compund that came with that had the cpu idling at like 55, the stock cooler done better. And i definetly put it it on right although fitting the cooler was a nightmare.

And then under the supervision of grandmaster WarriorScot i got arctic silver 5 and put that on, and it cut the temp by >>>OVER<<< 10 degrees. It now idles at 42 and loads at like 47. Over clocks a lot as well without reaching 60.
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#12
afg34

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When you buy HSF does it come wit thermal paste??
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#13
warriorscot

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Usually its best to get your own but most do yes.
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#14
comanighttrain

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Get your own, its worth it for about £6
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#15
Hammm

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Zalman make good HSF so i wouldn't think their thermal paste makes much difference
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