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Router Problem


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#1
nogard

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ok here is my problem

(1.) I am new to Networking, and don't understand everything yet!
(2.) Wanting to swtich to DSL from dialup with network for 5/3 computers.

I have a router (US Robotics 8054 Turbo Wireless G) it has 4 ports and one WAN port on back.

1st-Computer: Notebook Built In Wireless G/B (OS: Xp home service pack 2)

2nd-Computer: Notebook Linksys PCI Wireless-B Adaptor (OS: Xp home service pack 2)

3rd-Computer: Desktop Network Card (OS: Xp home service pack 2)

4th-Computer: Desktop Need to Install Network Card (OS: Windows 98se) Might upgrade to XP on this one. Fast computer..for what it is, but lacks a network card, not sure weather to go wirless card or wired card?

5th-Computer: Desktop Need to Install Network Card (OS: Windows 98se) May not even use this computer its an older model, slow 400 celeron

I was going to set up computer 1-2-3 on a network to play with , and work the bugs out, but the tutorial for the router says to hook up the cable or DSL first then continue with setup. I don't have DSL yet, so how can I get this network going, and debuged before getting DSL? I have never networked anything before, so I really have no clue what I am doing. I do have some computer skills, but not in networking, its forien to me. Counting myself, there are 3 of us that would be using this network for Internet, so at least 3 computers need to be working, the day the DSL is brought in. The other two would be real unhappy to go more than a few hours without internet.

So how can I set a network up with this router ahead of time , so when I get DSL it is simple fast easy way to configure these computers and get them surffing high speed fast.

PS: the CD that came with the Router is just a manual, and a totorial, the setup is web site driven, whats with this?....how do you network without an internet connection, with this kind of router? I have read all kinds of forum, and online tutorials, but none tell you how to setup a network with a router, without the aid of Broadband/DSL/Cable. Surly there are newtworks without internet somewhere. I know that today thats the main reason people at home network, but darn did every buisness out there have high speed 10 years ago? How did they share files? A server I guess...duh.just answered my own question.
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#2
Notsohandyandy

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Yeah, my Netgear wireless router had to connect to the internet too to set it up, duno buddy looks like you gotta wait, or refund ur router that allows to be setup w/out an internet connection

maybe setting up the network using a wizard.. then getting the information.. and typing it manually into the the web console? or must the router be setup to view the webconsole? also by web console im not saying you have to be connected to the net im pretty sure you can go to it without being connected

also have you considered looking at the tutorial/manual for information?

Edited by Notsohandyandy, 13 February 2006 - 04:14 AM.

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#3
Dan

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Hi nogard,
You seem to have made two posts, both of which appear to be discussing the same issue. Your other post is located here. However, this topic contains alot more detail in regards to your problem, so I have decided to post my response in this thread; if your other topic is based on a seperate issue, then please let me know. If it is indeed the same issue, then your other thread will be closed by a Moderator / Administrator.

Surly there are newtworks without internet somewhere.

You're absolutely right, and yes there are other networks out there that do not rely on the Internet, but are rather simply connected to share files, or alternately to create an Intranet.

4th-Computer: Desktop Need to Install Network Card (OS: Windows 98se) Might upgrade to XP on this one

Having all of your computers on the same Operating System (ie: Windows XP Home Edition) makes networking ALOT easier; however it is not a prerequisite.

not sure weather to go wirless card or wired card?

Personally, I always go wired over wireless, whenever possible. However, there are alot of people out there who have no problem(s) with wireless, and absolutely love it. So, by all means purchase a wireless adapter if you'd prefer it.

I was going to set up computer 1-2-3 on a network to play with , and work the bugs out, but the tutorial for the router says to hook up the cable or DSL first then continue with setup.

This isn't necessary; you can simply perform a powercycle once you install the DSL, which will do the same thing (I'll post the details on how to do a powercycle at the bottom).

the setup is web site driven

Are you sure it's not just asking you to log into your router's web console? This can be done without an Internet connection, by simply typing the router's IP Address into your Internet Explorer's Address Bar.

I don't have DSL yet, so how can I get this network going, and debuged before getting DSL?

It's a good idea to plan ahead. However how is your current setup? Because in order to properly setup your network to connect via the router, it may impair your Dial-up connection if you're sharing that with the other computers? Are you? Or does each computer have it's own connection? If so, continue...

Computer 1 (wireless):
  • (*NOTE: the below steps only apply to certain variants of wireless routers -- if these steps do not apply to you, proceed directly to Step Two(b): Run the Wireless Network Setup Wizard.)
  • Log into the wireless router's web console. You can connect to the web console by typing in the router's IP Address into your Internet Explorer Address Bar. If you do not know the IP Address, consult your manual.
  • Upon connecting to the router, you should be queried for a Username and Password. This information will also be located in your manual.
  • Once you're logged in, look for a tab in connection to Wireless Settings -- this section will allow you to setup the SSID, broadcasting channel and Encryption.
  • The SSID is simply a description of your Network -- anything will do, as long as it's relatively unique to you. You're allowed up to 32 letters to express yourself, but remember that your neighbours might get to see this name at some point!
  • Unless there is a specific network key that you must use, allow your router to automatically generate one -- once it has done this, be sure to write down both your SSID and your Network Key (on a piece of paper!).
Step Two(a): Run the Wireless Network Setup Wizard:
  • The easiest way to open the Wireless Network Setup Wizard is through the Start Menu: go to Programs, Accessories, then Communications, and you'll find it there.
  • The first thing to do when the wizard appears is read the welcome message, and click Next.
  • Now, enter the SSID that you created earlier in your router's web console, and that you wrote down on a piece of paper.
  • Enter the Network Key that you created earlier in the router's web console, and that you wrote down on a piece of paper.
  • If you bought equipment with WPA (stronger encryption), tick that box. Click Next again.
  • Unless you have a USB flash drive (it's unlikely), choose the option for manual setup. Don't worry -- it's just a matter of printing out some settings and entering them into your other computers. If you don't use encryption, you can usually skip this step.
  • Now, right-click on the wireless icon in the bottom-right corner of your screen -- it looks like a small computer with two lines on the right of it.
  • On the menu that appears, click 'View Available Wireless Networks'.
  • Now, you should see a list of the wireless networks your computer is in range of. Look for the name of your own network. This will be the name you typed in the setup wizard earlier or, if you use a router, it will probably be the name of your wireless equipment's manufacturer.
    (Note that this is the screen to come to if you ever want to connect to a wireless network other than your usual one -- just double click the one you want, wait a while, and it should work.)
  • To make sure Windows knows which network is yours, you need to click 'Change the order of preferred networks' on the left of the available networks screen.
  • You should click the 'Add' button to add the name of your network to this list, and use 'Remove' to take away any that aren't yours.
  • When you've highlighted your network, click Properties, and then go to the Connection section.
  • Make sure 'Connect when this network is in range' is ticked. If all else fails, you might have to take your printout from the Wireless Network Setup Wizard and enter that information on each computer.
Step Two(b): Run the Wireless Network Setup Wizard:
  • The easiest way to open the Wireless Network Setup Wizard is through the Start Menu: go to Programs, Accessories, then Communications, and you'll find it there.
  • The first thing to do when the wizard appears is read the welcome message, and click Next.
  • Now, type a name for your network -- anything will do, as long as it's relatively unique to you. You're allowed up to 32 letters to express yourself, but remember that your neighbours might get to see this name at some point! (Note: if you already have an SSID and Encryption Key, then you must enter these, rather than creating new ones.)
  • Unless you already have a network key that you absolutely must use, select the Automatically Assign a Network Key radio button.
    (Note: You should write down -- on a piece of paper -- both your SSID and your Network Key!)
  • If you bought equipment with WPA (stronger encryption), tick that box. Click Next again.
  • Unless you have a USB flash drive (it's unlikely), choose the option for manual setup. Don't worry -- it's just a matter of printing out some settings and entering them into your other computers. If you don't use encryption, you can usually skip this step.
  • Now, right-click on the wireless icon in the bottom-right corner of your screen -- it looks like a small computer with two lines on the right of it.
  • On the menu that appears, click 'View Available Wireless Networks'.
  • Now, you should see a list of the wireless networks your computer is in range of. Look for the name of your own network. This will be the name you typed in the setup wizard earlier or, if you use a router, it will probably be the name of your wireless equipment's manufacturer.
    (Note that this is the screen to come to if you ever want to connect to a wireless network other than your usual one -- just double click the one you want, wait a while, and it should work.)
  • To make sure Windows knows which network is yours, you need to click 'Change the order of preferred networks' on the left of the available networks screen.
  • You should click the 'Add' button to add the name of your network to this list, and use 'Remove' to take away any that aren't yours.
  • When you've highlighted your network, click Properties, and then go to the Connection section.
  • Make sure 'Connect when this network is in range' is ticked. If all else fails, you might have to take your printout from the Wireless Network Setup Wizard and enter that information on each computer.
Computer 2 & 3:
Run the Network Setup Wizard:
  • Goto Start --> Programs --> Accessories --> Communications --> Network Setup Wizard.
  • The first thing to do when the wizard appears is read the welcome message, and then click Next.
  • Read the 'Before you continue....' message, and then click Next.
  • Select the option This computer connects to the Internet through a residential gateway or another computer on my network, and then press Next.
  • Now, type in a Description for your computer; ie: Jimmy's Computer.
  • Enter a Computer Name (or leave it as it's Default), and then press Next.
  • Enter a Workgroup Name -- or leave it as it's default, and then press Next.
  • If you want to share files and/or your printer with other computers on the network, select the option Turn on file and printer sharing and press Next.
  • Check the information; if it is all fine, press Next.
  • Now, if possible, you should Create a Network Setup Disk -- once you have created a Network Setup Disk, insert it into Computer 3, and follow all prompts -- if this is not possible, repeat these steps on computer 3.
Are you now able to connect all of the computers to the Network? Are they all able to share files, etc? Ping each other? If not, try disabling the Firewalls (SP2 Windows Firewall).

When you finally get your DSL installed, you should do the following:
Powercycling
  • Power off your computer(s).
  • Shutdown / unplug your router.
  • Wait two minutes.
  • Connect your modem to a power outlet with the provided cord.
  • Connect your modem to the router's WAN port with the Ethernet cord.
  • Power on your modem. Wait until the modem has completely started (ie: all of the appropriate lights are on) before the next step. This may take upward of two minutes.
  • Power on your router. Wait until the router completely restarts. This also can take upward of two minutes.
  • Power on your computer.
Can you now connect to the Internet on your network?

Please let me know if you run into any problems;
Thanks,
Dan.
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#4
nogard

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You are correct there are two post but both diffrent things........This one is for home use, the other is for a group of my friends and myself.......So I guess I would have two diffrent networks to set up, one with internet sharing, and one without. When we are at my home, using the internet here is not a problem, but when we are elsewhere, the internet is not important, just need the file sharing network.

So it is possible to set of a network for DSL using my router, with out the use of DSL, as it can be added later?

Would I need to hook up a cat5 cable to a computer/router, to configure the router? I mean the first step......so that the router recieves the protocal....for the network from the web based configuration? Using my dial-up account I have now right?,

Step two, Then configure hook up all the other computer to see and access the network.

Step three, set up the DSL modem, to the router, then power everything up, and we have shared internet?

This ofcoarse fallowing your steps right?

Edited by nogard, 13 February 2006 - 04:38 PM.

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#5
nogard

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we have two dial-up accounts now that 3 of us share, but only one one each line, the third person has to wait thier turn, the reason I want DSL ........sorry forgot to add that to earlier post.
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#6
Dan

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This ofcoarse fallowing your steps right?

Yes, everything you said is correct.
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#7
nogard

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ok thanks Dan-G I will try these steps in the next few days, and post a fallow up.

I have just a few more question.

The tutorial say to contact the ISP for further detail of configuring my DSL modem. What should I expect, should I call ahead, is there anything I could get ahead of time that might aid in setting this up?


update: I have gotten a network card from my firend, and installed it on the 4 computer, Desktop windows 98se, and after several hours of finding the drivers online and getting the darn things installed, I got that working. (Note is was a network card he found in his old parts box)

I then hooked up a cat5 cable to it connected it to the router, got to the ip configuration thingy http:// 192.157.190.xxx or something, turned on wireless, named the network, turned wep off until I get all the bugs out.

Are you sure it's not just asking you to log into your router's web console? This can be done without an Internet connection, by simply typing the router's IP Address into your Internet Explorer's Address Bar.


I tried to. I launched a broswer offline and typed in the IP http:// 192.157.190.xxx or something, but it came up 404 file not found, however when I connected to the internet, it came right up. There are a bunch of diffrent setting to play with........and I have no clue what any of them do. So I just did the simple ones I knew about from reading online tutorials, and playing with Ad-Hoc networking.

Next I set up number 4 computer, got it on the network, then configured number 2 notebook computer, got it on the network.

Set up the workgroup, on both 2/4 computer, and turned on file sharing....shared the hard drives on each, and it works. I can access file on either computer threw the network.

Future plan: get the other number 1 notebook on the network.....and sharing files with the other two. Then I have to get enough cat5 to run to another room to hook up number 3 computer desktop, and get on the network and sharing files.

After I have done the above things, is there anything I am leaving out, before I get DSL?

Edited by nogard, 14 February 2006 - 04:52 AM.

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#8
nogard

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1# computer now on the network, and sharing files wth the other two......

How do you turn on internet sharing in windows 98se, I can find it in Xp, but not in 98se?
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#9
Dan

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I'm going to assume you mean that you want to setup the 98se computer as the Host for ICS?
  • Go to Start --> Settings --> Control Panel --> Add/Remove Programs.
  • Click on the Windows Setup tab, let Windows find the installed components.
  • Double click on the Communications icon, check the Internet Connection Sharing box and click OK to close the Communications window and OK to close the Add/Remove Programs window.
  • ICS will install and then launch the Home Networking Wizard.
  • Follow the steps of the Networking Wizard (if you run into problems, then I will a post more in-depth response).
  • Once you have done so, you should be prompted to restart; once restarted you should be able to share your Internet connection witht he Client computers.

The tutorial say to contact the ISP for further detail of configuring my DSL modem. What should I expect, should I call ahead, is there anything I could get ahead of time that might aid in setting this up?

I really don't think you're going to actually need to contact your ISP. This step is generally only performed if you're having difficulties; you should hopefully get everything setup with little-to-no difficulty.

Future plan: get the other number 1 notebook on the network.....and sharing files with the other two. Then I have to get enough cat5 to run to another room to hook up number 3 computer desktop, and get on the network and sharing files.

The only thing you need to keep an eye on is how many free ports there are on the back of your router; make sure you have enough to connect all of your computers.

After I have done the above things, is there anything I am leaving out, before I get DSL?

Nope, you should be good to go after powercycling, assuming of course that your ISP has installed everything corectly.
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#10
nogard

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I'm going to assume you mean that you want to setup the 98se computer as the Host for ICS?



I am not sure I may be confused,do I have to have a host computer for internet sharing, I mean once I get the DSL?

Does host mean that this computer number 4# has to be on for all the other computers to reicive their internet?

This computer connects to the Internet through a residential gateway or another computer on my network

<------not done yet on any of the pc's

can I do this fuction on all the computers and let the router give us our internet/DSL? so that no one computer has to run all the time as a host?

I will not share internet until I get DSL, I just wanted to know what to do the day I get it, and how that part works. If I tell these computer now that, I want This computer connects to the Internet through a residential gateway or another computer on my network, will it mess up my dial-up, as I have not set them up for that yet.

does residential gateway mean my router?

and its about 40 feet in the other room where I need the cat5 to run to the number 3 computer, the only one other than number 5 not on the network.

The only thing you need to keep an eye on is how many free ports there are on the back of your router; make sure you have enough to connect all of your computers.


the router has 4 slots for on back numbered, and won called WAN..and two antanas,.....right now only one slot used that is the first slot labled 1. So I have 3 free slots left open., and maybe to computer left to put on it wired.

I am still not certain if 5 should go on the network. It is used alot for the internet, even though its a slow computer, at 400 MHZ celeron and 128 Ram, and only a 4 gig HD, and it need a network card...is it worth the money of the card? your OP

Edited by nogard, 14 February 2006 - 09:32 PM.

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#11
Dan

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I am not sure I may be confused,do I have to have a host computer for internet sharing, I mean once I get the DSL?

No; perhaps I misinterpreted your statement. I assumed that your were trying to setup Internet Connection Sharing for your Dial-up, until you got hold of your DSL.

can I do this fuction on all the computers and let the router give us our internet/DSL? so that no one computer has to run all the time as a host?

Yes.

I will not share internet until I get DSL, I just wanted to know what to do the day I get it, and how that part works. If I tell these computer now that, I want This computer connects to the Internet through a residential gateway or another computer on my network, will it mess up my dial-up, as I have not set them up for that yet.

It depends how you're connecting to your Dial-up; in most instances, no. However, you can just wait until the day to do this step, as it'll really only take two minutes to do.

does residential gateway mean my router?

Correct :tazz:

I am still not certain if 5 should go on the network. It is used alot for the internet, even though its a slow computer, at 400 MHZ celeron and 128 Ram, and only a 4 gig HD, and it need a network card...is it worth the money of the card? your OP

Hm.. That computer is getting well and truly outdated -- it really depends on how often you plan to use that computer, and also if it's necessary (ie: If you need that computer to have Internet access). Personally, I wouldn't bother installing a Network adapter, unless I absolutely needed that computer to have Internet access. However, if you use it alot for the Internet, then what network adapter do you use? Do you take one from one of the other computers?
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#12
nogard

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Well Dan-G it looks like you got me pretty strightened out, thanks for all the help, you have answered all my question where I could understand them, and complete them. You helped make this networking easy to understand and get setup.

I have 1-2-3-4 computers on the network, and they all share files, soon internet as well. I think computer number 5 is going to retire, I can't see paying to put a network card in such an old computer, I will simply move number 3 into that room for that person to replace number 5.

However, if you use it alot for the Internet, then what network adapter do you use? Do you take one from one of the other computers?

number 5 - It has a modem hookup for a phone line only, no network card. That computer will be replaced, wth number - 3, a 1.7 ghrz, 512 ram, 60 GB HD with a 10/100 network card.
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#13
nogard

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Well I now have DSL, and everything went as planed.........its all working great....thanks again for all the help Dan G!
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#14
Dan

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Great news :tazz:

Thanks for getting back to us; it's always nice to know how things go. Setting up a network is really quite easy, once you know what you're doing :) If you run into any other hiccups, don't hesitate to ask :)
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