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New DVDs already sparking copy-protection confusion


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#1
Retired Tech

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When the first high-definition DVDs finally hit shelves this spring, a mad scramble may ensue--not for the discs themselves, but to figure out what computers and devices are actually able to play them in their full glory

The everyday analog plug that connects most computers to monitors today doesn't support copy protection, and so is viewed as unsafe by Hollywood studios. Movies playing on a computer over this ordinary analog connection will likely be downgraded to near-DVD quality.

Even worse is the so-called DVI plug that sends high-quality digital signals to a monitor but also doesn't support copy protection.

That offers an even greater risk of copying in Hollywood's eyes. Studios have persuaded Microsoft to add a feature in the upcoming Vista operating system that can shut down that connection altogether, unless the computer has an Intel-created encryption technology called HDCP, or High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection, turned on to guard the signal all the way to the monitor screen.

Put another way--if the DVD doesn't like your plug, your monitor may go black.

http://news.com.com/...40261&subj=news
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#2
dsenette

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i guess the next step is to coat the dvd in a hard plastic so that you can't manually count the pits on the disk and translate the code out....STUPID
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#3
Tempest210

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I have been following this topic for some time now, and I would like to point out a few obvious things. First, most people watch their movies, like me, on their wide-screen TV. Now, nothing is stopping a program from being written, or possible already available to copy these DVD’s for play on your set-top DVD player.

Next, while Windows Vista might stop you from viewing/copying a HD-DVD disc, etc, that doesn’t mean XP users or a system running Linux will have these restrictions.

If someone in the Linux camp writes a program that lets you view or copy the HD-DVD or Blu-ray DVD, then this is all for not. I, like many users run a duel boot system, (I run the 64 Bit SUSE Linux from time to time) but you don’t even need to do that, as you can just use Knoppix’s 4.0.2 CD version of Linux and boot into that OS right off the CD. Future versions might have software on them that will let you view or copy these types of discs.

Also, it’s the computer ‘geeks’ and ‘techs’ that like to get on-board the tech-bandwagon first, and if these new monitors, video cards, and Windows Vista handcuff us to much, then sales will suffer, and if your business is to sell monitors or video cards, how long can you hold out before your competitor(s) say, ‘screw this’, and offer up what people will buy?

Unless Hollywood is going to cough up tens of millions of dollars to these manufactures I can’t see this as being a winning situation for hardware venders.
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#4
warriorscot

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Intel cough up billions for that very reason, its quite possible they will offer subsidies to companies. I will always be in the firm camp that the best copy protection is better products and fair prices if a DVD was priced fairly and had lots of extra content a nice box etc etc then there would be less in the way of pirating.
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#5
Tempest210

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I guess Sony and Microsoft must think all we do with our computers is make copies of software and movies all day long. I don't buy many movies, because few I want to watch again, so I just rent them. I guess if you make a copy of a rented movie you are not going to rent it again, but how many people rent a movie, then rent it again unless it's years later, and by then you can get buy it for a few dollars.

I have bought some movies for the kids, and these, like the Incredibles, I backed-up because, and anyone with young kids at home knows, if they get their hands on them, and they do, they find new and wonderful uses for the DVD. So that would be my only concern.
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#6
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I read once on a site that: "If you can read it, you can copy it." They were talking about copy protection things on DVD's. Can the Windows Vista really stop this?
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#7
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The law may differ according to location but the European view is this

1) Can I lawfully make a copy for my personal use of a film on DVD or music on a CD, which I lawfully acquired?

Yes, you are allowed to do so unless the DVD or the CD is protected by a measure which makes it impossible to copy unless the measure is circumvented, which is the case as regards e.g. copy-protected CDs.

However, if you have borrowed or leased the DVD/CD from others, including from libraries or a video store, it is illegal to make a copy of it. Nor is it legal to copy a copy of a CD/DVD if you have got the copy from others.

2) Is it allowed to circumvent a copy-protection mechanism in order to make a copy for my personal use of a film on a DVD or of music on a CD?

No, it is illegal to circumvent the copy-protection mechanism, although it is legal to make a copy for your personal use. If a DVD or CD is copy-protected you are in other words excluded from legally making a copy for personal use.
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