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Possible scam attack, purportedly from Microsoft.

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Best Answer batpark , 29 November 2020 - 12:03 PM

phillpower2: Thanks for your response. I will try to avoid squishy sites in the future and hope that these incidents are rare and no more damaging than this one. ... batpark Go to the full post »


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#1
batpark

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For the second time in the last few months months I ran into this incident while browsing

with Google Chrome on a Lenovo laptop (with Windows 10).

 

My session was interrupted by loud beeping and screens screaming that my system was blocked and that I needed to call a

certain telephone number. I was warned not to shut down or do anything but call. The

message purported to be from Microsoft. My system, indeed, was blocked.

 

As I had the last time this occurred, I suspected the alarms to be an attack and ignored them.

I shut down and restarted, only to find my pc still blocked and the warning signs still

screaming away. That condition persisted the next morning, but cleared completely when I

found some button (which one I cannot recall) that stopped the beeping and textual

screaming and returned my system to normal.

 

Very unfortunately, I did not copy down the telephone number I was commanded to call.

 

I wonder if any GtGer can tell me:

 

o Was it reckless of me to ignore the threatening text commands? Should I have called and

talked to the posted telephone number .... which I suspected was a scammer? What <should> I have done? 

 

o  Has any GtGer seen or heard of this kind of attack? Does Microsoft <ever> post such alerts and actually block a pc this way?

 

O How <can> I report this incident to Microsoft? If the alert/block was not from MS, I would think MS would be eager to hear

of my experience. – The only site I can find, on Google, for “Microsoft technical support” asks me to sign up (for about $40 for several weeks support or $1 per a single contact) before I can speak with someone. (This itself seems fishy to me; and is so different from the open 800 number one can use to contact Apple, for example. Can someone tell me of a free number I can use to reach MS, and not just someone posing as MS? My experience with Apple says it NEVER sends such an alert; is it true that, contrary-wise, MS does?

 

I welcome your comments and advice. How should one respond to such attacks? Thanks.

 

… batpark

 


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#2
phillpower2

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For the second time in the last few months months I ran into this incident while browsing
 
with Google Chrome on a Lenovo laptop (with Windows 10).
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
My session was interrupted by loud beeping and screens screaming that my system was blocked and that I needed to call a
 
certain telephone number. I was warned not to shut down or do anything but call. The
 
message purported to be from Microsoft. My system, indeed, was blocked.

 

 

Not suggesting that you were doing anything untoward but what sort of sites were you browsing on both occasions that this happened.

 

 

Does Microsoft <ever> post such alerts and actually block a pc this way?

 

 

Easy one to answer, "no" only bad guys behave in such a way and you were right to not call the number.


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#3
batpark

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✓  Best Answer

phillpower2: Thanks for your response. I will try to avoid squishy sites in the future and hope that these incidents are rare and no more damaging than this one. ... batpark


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#4
phillpower2

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Unfortunately such incidents are not rare and online criminals are using more and more convincing methods to try and exploit people.

 

I suggest that if not done already that you run your AV program and if it flags up any problems get your computer checked out by one of the GTG security experts.

 

You are welcome btw  :)


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