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Sari's grammar thread


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#166
Troy

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1 sheep, 2 sheep... it doesn't change.

The two crowds merged and continued down the street.

So, I guess crowds?
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#167
ZedU54

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...'crowd' is an example of a 'collective' noun. In American English, collectives are treated as singular nouns, but in British English, that isn't always the case; I often see collectives like band names and team names treated as plurals in the UK (you'll frequently see a name like Led Zeppelin or Manchester United followed by a plural verb in the UK, where we would use a singular in the US)...
...now, I don't know how you treat 'collectives' in Oz, but I tend to believe it would be more in line with the UK...just an educated guess :) ...

Edited by ZedU54, 01 June 2009 - 09:29 PM.

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#168
Chopin

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10 items or fewer

Whoops!
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#169
Chopin

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Rarely is the question asked: Is our children learning?

:)
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#170
Miriam84

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Ahh, my people! :) I must admit that I have long been the annoying friend, daughter, student, employee, etc. who is like the ever-present English teacher, pouncing on any and every grammatical error. You've all compiled quite the list, leaving little for me to add with regard to the basics. However, a few simple additions follow:
then/than
to/too/two
which/witch/wich (which is a suffix!)
accept/except
lie/lay


Furthermore, it really makes my brain hurt when people use such words as, "Fustrating/fustrated", "Irregardless", "Perscription", "Prostrate" (instead of a man's prostate), "Spaghettis" and the ever-popular, "Brung." This is another list that we could add to endlessly.

One last thing before I go: WHY DO PEOPLE INSIST ON ADDING "'s" IN AN ATTEMPT TO PLURALIZE?!? :)
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#171
Troy

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which/witch/wich (which is a suffix!)

Like as in sandwich? :)

EDIT: And wouldn't that be "wich is a suffix"?

Edited by Troy, 23 July 2009 - 07:09 AM.

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#172
Miriam84

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lol Exactly. And no, I meant it as in, "...wich, which is a suffix."
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#173
Troy

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Ahhh but I didn't know what you meant because you... never mind. :)

It's all good fun!
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#174
Abydos

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and the ever-popular, "Brung." This is another list that we could add to endlessly.


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bring

The form brung is common in colloquial use in many areas, even among educated speakers, but it is not standard in formal writing.


And why "Brung."? "Abydos points at the little red period... :) "

Hehe :)

Edited by Abydos, 26 July 2009 - 01:09 PM.

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#175
Miriam84

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The period goes inside of the end quote because it's the end of the sentence.

I refuse to accept the word, "Brung" as a "real" word! lol :)

Troy: I realize the potential for confusion with the which, witch, wich thing, but what'd I do?? lol
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#176
Abydos

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Well, It wasn't because I questioned the "word" brung as much as I haven't heard of it before. Mind you, english is not my native language, so I looked it up, just to see what word it was derived from :) Turns out, it is a "word", but not commonly used I gather. More like a slang sorta thing perhaps?

Hmmm, kinda confused about the period inside the quotes. I know it is correct, but leaving it out, would also be correct I think. At least in danish.
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#177
Chopin

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...misunderestimate

That's the only reason I like Bush :)

BRUNG? WHAT!?
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#178
Miriam84

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More like nobody with the intelligence beyond that of a field mouse uses the "word" "brung." lol

"Misunderestimate?!?" What the... LOL Wow.
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#179
Troy

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Does that mean the estimate was correct? :)
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#180
Chopin

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That's what it implies, Troy :) The original context was something like "... they have misunderestimated the United States..." :)
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