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Mega Upgrades


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#91
james_8970

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I don't have time to look at up links right now, google is your friend :)
Unless your overclocking you can completely ignore this because your multiplier will be set up automatically.


Ram chips, like CPU chips, are sold on their rated speed. DDR2-800 actually operates at 400 MHz, this is because ram transmits their bits on the rising and falling edge of the clock (similarly, DDR2- 667, actually operates at 333 Mhz, and DDR2-533 will operate at 266 MHz.

The FSB clocks itself by quad pumping the system clock, the memory clocks itself by a ratio of this clock (what you call FSB : DRAM), the CPU clocks itself by a multiplier x the system clock.

Since Intel (or AMD for that matter) fix the system clock for any particular generation, then to make all the different RAMs compatible, the RAM must be 'divided'. For example, to Run DDR2-800 at the rated 400MHz on a C2D stock system, the system clock of 266 must be multiplied by 3 then divided by 2 or a ratio of 3:2. This would convert the system clock to 400 MHz and send data at DDR2-800 speeds. As another example, DDR2-533 is clocked at 266, so it is a 1:1 match for the stock 266MHz. If you overclock to 333 MHz for example, DDR2-533 would likely fail as this is now significantly above it's rated speed.

Keep in mind that Gigabyte has a simplified BIOS, instead of using the 1:1 ratio, or 3:2 ratio, it'll say 2x or 1.5x multiplier. however as of now, Gigabyte doesn't support a multiplier lower then 2. If you don't understand this, there really is no better way that I can explain it and you'll have to go and do a little research on the topic, again if you don't plan on overclocking, there is no need to worry about this.

Hope that clears it up.

James

Edited by james_8970, 02 November 2007 - 09:35 AM.

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#92
Troy

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So if I overclocked the processor so that it was running at 1600MHz FSB (over 1333MHz stock), then that would be 1:1 with my RAM? (800MHz : 800MHz) Would this make a worthwhile performance increase?

I wasn't planning on overclocking at all, just wanting the best I can get from standard-rated speeds. But now I'm interested, with the P35 chipset being very lovely on overclocking the Core 2 Duo chips, I might perform a slight overclock (say 5% or so). I don't have the necessary "hardcore" performance bits for heavy overclocking, but if all goes well with the build and I want a wee-little bit more :)

Thanks for your help so far! I've done lots of hardware replacements, re-built systems and stuff, but everything has always just "worked" out of the box no problems, I haven't had to learn as much as I have with this brand-new build :) (It's good, though!)
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#93
james_8970

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So if I overclocked the processor so that it was running at 1600MHz FSB (over 1333MHz stock), then that would be 1:1 with my RAM? (800MHz : 800MHz) Would this make a worthwhile performance increase?

Close, they would both be actually running at 400MHz, the FSB has four "ticks" per clock cycle while memory only has two.

If your only doing a 5% overclock you will not want to use a 1:1 ratio, this would dramatically reduce your RAM's speed. If you do plan on overclocking there are a number of features that need to be changed from an auto setting to manual. The gigabyte BIOS like to adjust things to make your computer as stable as possible, but in most cases it does more harm then good. For an example it likes to overvolt your CPU, which will increase heat output and shorten the lifespan of your parts.

James

Edited by james_8970, 04 November 2007 - 12:52 PM.

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#94
Troy

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Okay, I'm just starting to put things together, I should be getting the graphics card tomorrow or Thursday.

So I'm trying to put the processor into the motherboard, and there's no holes? Is that right? I started moving the lever down to lock it in place, and it felt like I was squishing the pins inside? (very little pressure before I stopped) Yikes! They all look perfectly slanted, I didn't notice what they were like before hand...

Is this okay? I've changed processors before and never felt anything like this! They've had holes and slotted in nicely. Is it supposed to be a little bit harder because there's no holes on the Core 2 Duo processor?

I won't be happy if I've ruined my motherboard already :)
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#95
admin

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It wouldn't hurt to review the instructions that came with the processor. With Core processors, the pins are located in the motherboard. It can make a little crunching sound when seating. The most important thing is to make sure the notches line up and that it's oriented correctly.
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#96
Troy

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And I well and truly followed the instructions up to that point, I have double-checked everything in my head afterward and am convinced I have done nothing wrong yet. So do the pins bend on first use? Are they not perfectly straight to begin with? I would post a picture, but I can't get my digital camera to see as good as I can :)

It looks like the pins start from the top-right, then come diagonally toward the bottom-right as they come up (if that makes sense). Why isn't anyone online when I need you??!! :)
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#97
Troy

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Oh hi admin! Didn't see you! (And I answered your point!)

I am convinced everything is perfect - it also only fits one way, and I am very careful when changing/replacing any components... A crunching sound, you say? I haven't gone that far yet. Sounds weird :)

Yes the Core 2 Duo processors use the LGA775 package, meaning Land Grid Array (pins on the land - motherboard). I have not actually seen an LGA775 processor before, now that I think of it. I have replaced the older 478 and also AMD processors, but I have only replaced the heatsink/fan combo, therefore I have never taken an LGA775 processor out. Hhhhmmm, this is a good learning experience, anyway.

EDIT: P.S. Thanks for your response! I appreciate anybody's insight in my threads, always good to hear as many different (or same) points of view on an issue :)

Edited by troy, 05 November 2007 - 11:11 PM.

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#98
stettybet0

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So have you gotten the cpu in? I have the same one, and it uses ZIF (zero-insertion force), so it should just drop right in. You do have to use some force in closing the lever, however. Just make sure the cpu is lined up correctly.
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#99
Troy

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Thanks stettybet0.

Yes, it's the lever bit I'm concerned about. It sits in the socket very nicely, but I only slightly started on closing the lever when I thought "Hhhmmm that's pretty heavy, I don't want to force it in".

Does anyone know if the pins on the motherboard bend on first use, or aren't perfectly vertical in the first place? I should have paid close attention before I started :)
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#100
stettybet0

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If the chip is sitting flush, then the pins are how they should be. When you put the metal thing down (you know, the part you push on with the lever), it should look like it won't be flush. This freaked me out at first. But this is normal, because the pressure on the lever will make the metal thing flush, and everything will be okay! :)
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#101
Troy

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This freaked me out at first.

I think this is the point where I am :)
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#102
james_8970

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As admin mentioned read your motherboard/CPU instructions again, there is only one way this CPU will fit, if your CPU will fit inside the two notches, then you've entered it in correctly.
There is a slight "crunching" noise when you close the lever.
The notches can be found in this picture on the north-west and south-west portion of this chip
James

Edit: I need to type a little faster......

Edited by james_8970, 05 November 2007 - 11:22 PM.

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#103
Troy

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Okay, it definitely is sitting in the right way, no doubt about it. It never was oriented the wrong way.

I don't like the idea of the "crunching" sound, can't they make it perfect? :)

If I'm right in my thinking, the "crunching" sound would be the processor going hard up against the pins? Does anyone know if the pins do bend? Or rather, become on an angle? They still look straight, just no longer vertical (if they were vertical in the first place!)

Boy, just chuck a tazz about nobody being online, and viola! Heh heh, I should do that more often :)
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#104
stettybet0

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This is what my uncle told me in this situation while he was helping me build my first computer:

"If you don't do it in the next 5 minutes, I'm leaving."

Haha, the moral is: Just go for it! If you know you have it lined up, just push that sucker down and lock it in.
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#105
james_8970

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:) I'm just taking a study break. Been on and off all day, this is what I enjoy to do, cools the steam thats created from hours of steady studying. Another reason might be because your in Australia, it's 11:30 here :) Probably mid day for you.

Couldn't really tell you what the exact cause of the crunching is, when I take my CPU out next month for my water cooling project or do a little reading this weekend then maybe I could tell you :)
On another note, you better be buying Crysis now that you have a rig, Geektogo should make a bit of a clan as there seems to be quite a bit of interest regarding this game on the forums, or at least we play one another once. By that way wife will like the graphics of Crysis (this can be your excuse), my mom sat down to watch the graphics, regardless of the fact of it being a first person shooter.
James

Edit: *James thinks he needs to take more english courses at university to fix his very, very poor grammar and spelling in the forums.

Edited by james_8970, 05 November 2007 - 11:41 PM.

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