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Sari's grammar thread


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#76
Troy

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Don't forget to eat your beats :)

(or is that beets?)
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#77
**Brian**

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I can't find a good explanation of beaten vs. beat on the dictionary sites - they lump them together as a verb or transitive verb, depending on usage. However, beaten would be the past tense, i.e., Rodney King was beaten by police, the eggs were beaten, and in this case it's a transitive verb (I believe) because it's referring to an action that will occur to the object. The dog was beaten, the eggs will be beaten, landlord and troy will be beaten up by sari, etc.

If you're using it as a regular verb, you would use beat, i.e., I beat the eggs (that would be past tense), or I'm going to beat the eggs. In this case, the verb goes with the person performing the action; I beat, you beat, he will beat, sari beat landlord and troy to a pulp (:)).


**Brian Laughs and thanks Sari for her research - the article writer must have made an error (:))
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#78
amusinglisa

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What about "appreciative" as a verb? "I am so appreciative"? That one drives me to drink. People try to "verbalize" everything when there are perfectly good verbs all through the language (like "grateful" or "delighted" or "obliged").
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#79
Ax238

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Hey amusinglisa,

The only verb in your sentence is "am". Appreciative is an adjective in that sentence, as it describes the noun.

I like this one: D-E-F-I-N-I-T-E-L-Y
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#80
sari

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:) , Ax238. You know what drives me crazy? The misspelling of inconvenience. How many times have you seen something like this:

The ATM is out of order. We apologize for any inconvience (or inconvence, or inconience, or many other variations).


I've also seen this in store:

For pricing on this item, please ask store personal.


Does that mean we place a personal ad? I actually hunted down the manager in that case and asked him to correct the sign. :)
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#81
Excal

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I actually hunted down the manager in that case and asked him to correct the sign. :)



I can actually see that happening!!!! :)
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#82
sari

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I'm not called the Global Goddess of Grammar Moderation for nothing!
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#83
sari

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What about "appreciative" as a verb? "I am so appreciative"? That one drives me to drink. People try to "verbalize" everything when there are perfectly good verbs all through the language (like "grateful" or "delighted" or "obliged").


Actually, according to Merriam-Webster, the word appreciative has been around since 1698, and it is an adjective, as Ax said.
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#84
Ax238

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You know what drives me crazy? The misspelling of inconvenience.

Maybe they consider it an inconvenience to ensure appropriate spelling. :) Oh yeah, that's another one that's not incorrect, but it drives me nuts: when people use "insure" when they can appropriately use "ensure". I always think of insurance when I hear "insure".

Commonly Misspelled Words
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#85
hfcg

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This is good. I need to improve my communication skills.may I add my pet peeves?
Most people (in the USA) use I.E. for "in example. This is not correct. I.E. = "that is to say"
E.G. is "in example"
This comes from the abreviation o the latin words (do not know them off the top of my head
)click here to ckeck out more latin phrases
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#86
Ax238

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Good point you brought up. Another way to think of i.e. is "In other words".

E.G. = Exempli Gratia
I.E. = Id Est (Latin: That Is)
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#87
hfcg

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Men simply cannot. In talking to them, I find that they can do, at most, two tasks in a superior manner at once. And usually they can only do one.


MEN HAVE LEARNED TO NOT LET WOMEN KNOW THE EXTENT OF WHAT WE CAN DO AS WE WILL GET NAGGED LESS IF WOMEN THINK US INCAPABLE (SAID I WHO HAS TO ASK MY WIFE HOW TO SPELL EVERY THIRD WORD)
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#88
sari

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Apparently only your wife knows how to turn off the caps lock key, also, and she must have been out this evening.
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#89
stettybet0

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Apparently only your wife knows how to turn off the caps lock key, also, and she must have been out this evening.


Sari am winnar!
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#90
The only pirate washer.

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Harhar. You are the grammar queen. Lol. It is actually really annoying when people correct what one writes. However it is also a very good way to learn.


:)
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