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Is running an i5-7600K at almost 80 degrees(C) safe for long periods?

CPU temperature rendering Turbo Boost

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#1
Tungsten72

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Hello,

 

So I recently installed an i5-7600K processor. Yesterday, I used it to render an 8K resolution 3D image, which took about 50 minutes. I opened HWMonitor, which told me that the CPU was running from 77-79 degrees© throughout the whole rendering process. Task manager told me that the CPU was running at 4.13 - 4.17GHZ. It's max speed is 3.8GHZ, so it was utilizing Turbo Boost 2.0 throughout the entire rendering process. Could running my CPU at that temperature for 50 minutes possibly have damaged my CPU? Also, is running Turbo Boost 2.0 for that long bad for my CPU?

 

Thanks in advance!


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#2
phillpower2

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Hello Tungsten72,

 

The maximum safe operating temp of the i5-7600K is 100°C so running it at almost 80°C for extended periods of time is not good, sure that you will know already but an i7 with 4 cores and 8 threads would be better, get the job done quicker + lighten the load = lower temps.


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#3
Tungsten72

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Hello Tungsten72,

 

The maximum safe operating temp of the i5-7600K is 100°C so running it at almost 80°C for extended periods of time is not good, sure that you will know already but an i7 with 4 cores and 8 threads would be better, get the job done quicker + lighten the load = lower temps.

 

Ok. So there's no chance I could have damaged the processor by what I've already done?


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#4
phillpower2

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Without knowing how often and for how long you have run at those temps no one could possibly say, once or twice would be fine but you shouldn't make a habit of it.

 

Good case cooling + having a good GPU and adequate RAM are a couple of things that would also help to reduce the temps as would having a good quality and adequate output PSU to power your hardware.


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#5
Tungsten72

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Without knowing how often and for how long you have run at those temps no one could possibly say, once or twice would be fine but you shouldn't make a habit of it.

 

Good case cooling + having a good GPU and adequate RAM are a couple of things that would also help to reduce the temps as would having a good quality and adequate output PSU to power your hardware.

 

Yeah I've only done it once or twice so far. Is there any way in Windows 10 that I can limit CPU usage for a specific program so that I can get cooler temperatures suitable for long term use? As of right now, I'm ok with longer render times, just so long as I can protect my CPU.


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#6
phillpower2

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Thats called papering over the cracks  :whistling:

 

Not used it myself but check out BES from here  expect things to take an eternity whenever you throttle back resources.

 

NB: You may need to try a beta version for Windows 10.


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#7
terry1966

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it'll be fine, the cpu will throttle down when it gets to dangerous temps.

cooler is always better though so unless you want to underclock the cpu in bios/uefi then i'd suggest installing a better cpu cooler or maybe run with the side of the case open.

 

:popcorn:


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#8
iammykyl

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Gday.

What is the brand/model of the cooler you installed?


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#9
Tungsten72

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Thats called papering over the cracks  :whistling:

 

Not used it myself but check out BES from here  expect things to take an eternity whenever you throttle back resources.

 

NB: You may need to try a beta version for Windows 10.

Thanks, I'll try that out

 

Gday.

What is the brand/model of the cooler you installed?

 

I installed a Cryorig C7 fan with Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut thermal grease.


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#10
iammykyl

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Here is the most recent review I could find, note this is with a i7. 

In general, the C7 is just a little better than a stock Intel one, so you can't expect wonders, but, it should be better than you are getting, unless you have a tiny case.

If you applied too much paste, this could give poor results.   What is the idle temps, after leaving it running for ten minutes?

What MB?

https://www.kitguru....ooler-review/5/


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#11
Tungsten72

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Here is the most recent review I could find, note this is with a i7. 

In general, the C7 is just a little better than a stock Intel one, so you can't expect wonders, but, it should be better than you are getting, unless you have a tiny case.

If you applied too much paste, this could give poor results.   What is the idle temps, after leaving it running for ten minutes?

What MB?

https://www.kitguru....ooler-review/5/

 

 

After 10 minutes, idle temps with only HWMonitor running are around 36°C. It's since jumped up to 55°C, and is running at 4.13-4.17GHZ. It seems Windows Modules Installer Worker is behind that. Not sure if that's necessarily a problem though.

As far as thermal paste goes, I tried to apply about a half-pea-sized amount.

 

Here are all my components:

 

Case: Corsair Carbide Series SPEC-ALPHA

PSU: EVGA SuperNOVA 650 G2

Graphics: ASUS GTX 1080 8GB ROG STRIX

CPU: Intel i5-7600k

CPU Cooler: Cryorig C7

MB: Asus Prime Z270A Motherboard

RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16GB Kit

HD: WD Blue 1TB

SSD: Samsung 250GB 850 EVO


Edited by Tungsten72, 31 May 2017 - 09:31 AM.

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#12
iammykyl

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Thanks for the info, and sorry for the late reply.

TIM application is good.   Before the next boot, hold onto the cooler and very gently rock/twist it to make sure it is securely installed. 

See if you can take/upload a screenshot of the UEFI EZ screen.

Plug in a FAT32 formatted USB stick, > restart the computer and enter UEFI, > press F12 key, go exit and and reboot into windows.

Look in the USB  and if present, upload the UEFI screenshot.

 

UEFI only user guide, >https://www.asus.com...elpDesk_Manual/


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#13
Tungsten72

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Attached File  170602113937.BMP   3MB   44 downloads

Thanks for the info, and sorry for the late reply.

TIM application is good.   Before the next boot, hold onto the cooler and very gently rock/twist it to make sure it is securely installed. 

See if you can take/upload a screenshot of the UEFI EZ screen.

Plug in a FAT32 formatted USB stick, > restart the computer and enter UEFI, > press F12 key, go exit and and reboot into windows.

Look in the USB  and if present, upload the UEFI screenshot.

 

UEFI only user guide, >http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1151/PRIME_Z270-A/E12293_PRIME_Z270-A_AR_BIOS_EM_WEB.pdf 

 

I checked the cooler, and it seems pretty solid. I do remember it being a pain to get seated on the cpu properly, but I looked and it seemed like it was indeed in contact with the cpu.

I've attached the UEFI screenshot above


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#14
iammykyl

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BIOS info, even with the manual, is a bit limited.

I think you have three case fans?   All seem to be connected to the HAMP header, possible giving you poor control.   I would connect the rear fan to chs f 1 and the two front to HAMP.

Power on, > enter UEFI, > press F5 to load default setting, > boot to the desktop.

Restart and enter UEFI, > change fan profile to standard.

> enable XMP. > press F10 to save settings and exit.

 

Try a render test again and let us know the results. 


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#15
Tungsten72

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BIOS info, even with the manual, is a bit limited.

I think you have three case fans?   All seem to be connected to the HAMP header, possible giving you poor control.   I would connect the rear fan to chs f 1 and the two front to HAMP.

Power on, > enter UEFI, > press F5 to load default setting, > boot to the desktop.

Restart and enter UEFI, > change fan profile to standard.

> enable XMP. > press F10 to save settings and exit.

 

Try a render test again and let us know the results. 

 

Yes I have 3 case fans. 2 in front, 1 in back. 

I moved the back fan over to the CHA_FAN1 header, made sure the fan profile was on standard, and enabled XMP. When I set XMP to Profile 1, it asked me if I want to apply the "all core enhancement with the XMP settings for improved performance." Should I do that?

Well I tried another render using the same image under the same settings and let it run for about 7 mins. CPU temp stayed around 68-69°C, and was running at 3.94-3.98GHZ instead of 4.13-4.17. The render time would have taken about 20-30% longer at 55mins.


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